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How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Posted by socks12345 (My Page) on
Sun, Oct 9, 11 at 16:19

I got a beef ribeye bone-in roast at the market this morning.

I have no idea how to cook it, long and slow, covered or not, how to season. Help!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Bone in rib eye I want no more than medium rare....very rare is better to me.
I would cook it at 425....length of time depending on size....but to no more then 120 on the inside....
Rub it with crushed garlic before cooking and a little kosher salt.
Don't forget the Yorkshire puddings.
Linda c


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

I'm also interested. What sort of pan, do you put it on a rack or what? Like a roasting rack you'd put a turkey on? I'm also going to assume you'd want it room temp like you'd do before you grill a steak? Approx. how many minutes per lb for medium rare?


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Socks12345,

It all depends.

First thing to decide is how do you like your steak done inside, and how do you like your steak done out side.

Then you can find information on the Internet the precise temperature for the degree of doneness that you prefer. (Like the one I linked below)

Everything else is variable.

"Room Temperature" can be from 70 F to 95 F

The thickness of the meat, the fat layers, and the bones all conduct heat differently.

Do you have a gas, electric or convection oven?

Do you put the meat inside the oven near the front? Top? Bottom?

Therefore, what you need is a good probe thermometer to check the temperature and get a rough idea from the internet "resting time" suggested for the thickness of your meat for the "carry-over" heat to reach the desire temperature inside for the degree of doneness you desire.

Keeping in mind that the temperature of the oven effects mostly how the outside of the meat is done, not so much how fast the inside temperature can be reached once it is over 212 F.

Good luck and enjoy your ribeye roast.

dcarch

Here is a link that might be useful: Beef temperature


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Socks, One of my favourite cuts. You don't need a rack. Just put the roast in a shallow roasting pan, bone side down. The bones will act as the rack.


I can highly recommend Barbara Kafka's High Heat method. I roast just about roast of meat at 500°F. Perfect every time.

Like Linda we prefer our meat rare. Take it out of the oven when the temperature is between 115°F and 120°F.

If you have time I'd also pre-salt the roast two days in advance and then rub it with fresh garlic and lots of black pepper before roasting. If you don't have time to presalt, than just add the salt along with the garlic and pepper.
Remove the bones before carving. Just stand the roast up on one end and slice straight down between the meat and the bones. This will separate the bones from the meat. Now the roast is easy to slice.

Yorkshire Puddings are a favourite side with a Rib Roast.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Thanks ann t for the information that's usable! :) That picture looks so delicious! YUM!


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

AK Girl - I'm quite novice at this, but, since you are interested in med-rare as opposed to rare I'd be inclined to go with a low temp so that you get that med-rare throughout rather than a thick band of med/med-well before the center reaches temp. I'm not sure that Ann would have gotten such a beautiful profile if she had let it get up to med-rare. (Again, I'm a novice so I could be wrong!)

Cook's Illustrated's method worked perfectly for me last Christmas: you sear the outside and then roast at 250. One benefit they claim and I verified is that carryover cooking becomes negligible, perhaps a couple degrees max.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Actually FOAS, the high method works well for medium rare as well. In fact, the beef in that picture is more medium rare than rare.

Ann


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Well then I stand corrected! The picture does look med-rare but knowing your preference I just assumed it might look more done than it really was.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

I'd brown the outside, either before or after roasting. Or give it a couple minutes of broiler, turning every minute, after roasting. Crusty = yummy.

A sauce would be interesting too. If you set the roast on the oven rack with a pot below, you should collect enough juices to make a pan sauce, well maybe not if you vaporize them at 500F, but at a lower temp. Liquor + juices + cream works. "Liquor" can be cognac, wine, amaretto, grand marnier, even tia maria.

I personally think it is fun to get sweet and savory in one bite. You could thus serve something sweet on the side. The combo of mint jelly + lamb is one such pairing. Fruit can be pureed to make a quick condiment. I like red seedless grapes, pureed, press out most of the water (mesh strainer or paper towels), mix in a bit of sugar if you like. In a pinch, experiment with whatever jelly or marmalade you have around. Sweet potato mash serves a similar purpose, less flagrantly.

You could also take a page from the lamb playbook, and mix some olive oil, crushed garlic, minced rosemary, chopped nuts, and soft butter, then press that onto the roast as a crust.

Another way of cooking a roast, definitely fun, is buried in rock salt. No, it doesn't get salty. The salt absorbs heat and transfers it to the meat more effectively than air does, and reduces evaporation of the meat's juices. Just buy 2 lb rock salt, put the roast in a Dutch oven with salt under, over, and all around.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

I'm another proponent of the high heat method for roasting a tender cut like a rib roast or strip roast.

I basically follow the directions Ann t posted. After seasoning the outside of the roast, I rub some flour into the fat covering the top of it. It helps to minimize the spattering and also makes a brown, crispy crust.

Although there are many successful methods for cooking a rib roast, I've never seen any where liquid was added to the pan.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Johnliu, I find this comment amusing. "....well maybe not if you vaporize them at 500F......."

Obviously, you have never tried the high heat method. You actually end up with rich, condensced drippings that make very flavourful sauces and gravies.

Socks, Personally I wouldn't recommend Amaretto, Grand Marnier, Tia Maria, or any other "flavoured" type liqueur or liquid with a good cut of beef. I'd keep the seasonings simple and stick with fresh herbs, and broth or red wine to flavour the sauce.

Ruthanna, thanks for mentioning your flour trick again. I'm going to do that the next time I roast.

Ann


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

I have found with high heat roasting, that it's important to use a pan not much bigger than the roast otherwise the drippings will burn. This can also apply to lower temperatures but not nearly as much.
Also, the rack should neatly fit the pan.

I high heat roast most things and prefer the final textural result. Chicken in particular, seems considerably juicer that way.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Thank you, everyone. I'm getting ready to put it in the oven now, but I might switch to a smaller pan as you suggested, Bumblebeez.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Posted by Johnliu: "-----Another way of cooking a roast, definitely fun, is buried in rock salt. No, it doesn't get salty. The salt absorbs heat and transfers it to the meat more effectively than air does, and reduces evaporation of the meat's juices. Just buy 2 lb rock salt, put the roast in a Dutch oven with salt under, over, and all around. ----"

That is a very good way to make an extraordinary roast. Basically, the salt layer insulates the heat, allowing the "slow & low" method to take place easier.
----------------------------------------------------
Simple facts "Slow & Low" method addresses:

1. Water boils at 212 F. As long as there is water, you can never go above 212 F, regardless how high you set the temperature. (normal pressure)
2. Meat is a poor conductor of heat.
3. Meat shrinks under high heat and toughens (well-done).
4. Heat can only migrate from high to low and it is not reversible.
5. Meat gets tenderized (collagen denaturing) even at low temperature if cooked long enough.
6. Resting means cold meat.

The picture shows a typical roast prepared the typical normal way. No matter how you slice it (PUN?), you generally end up in some degree the following (Which, BTW, to many people that's the way it should be for a perfect ribeye)


Photobucket




Zone one - Brown layer (Maillard reaction), Many chefs advise not to char the meat. Browning gives the flavor. Charcoal is not tasty. Also, at higher temperatures, more carcinogenic compounds can be produced.

Zone two - well done layer (meat is tough and dry). This is the 212 F to 165 F layer.

Zone three - Medium. The 212 F layer of heat travels inward to warn up the colder layer to 145 F.

Zone four - Medium rare. The layer is about 135 F.

Zone five - Rare. The 212 F finally reaches this layer and warms it to 125 F after a long rest. Meanwhile the 212 F layer is get cold to room temperature from losing heat to the air and to heat the inside of the meat.

Zone six - raw, uncooked meat.

One problem with "Slow & Low". You produce very little juice, because the meat shrinks very little.

The reason for "Low" is ridiculously simple. If the final desired temperature is 125 F, why not just cook at that temperature?

The reasons for "slow", well I will let the author Nathan Myhrvold of the $500.00 cook book Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking explain to you why 24 hours is recommended for ribeye. If you just Google his name.

And I will also let the famous chef Heston Blumenthal show you in this video how he too cooks low and slow:

Here is a link that might be useful: Low & Slow


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

OK, I cooked it and it was pretty good. Now I have leftovers that I don't know what to do with. Would it be good as stir-fry? I sliced it too thick for sandwiches. Or just re-heat, but how to do so it does not get tough?


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Several ideas on the linked thread, and I highly recommend the one I posted there.

Here is a link that might be useful: Prime Rib Leftovers Thread


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

I love this recipe from Ruthanna.

Posted by: Ruthanna (My Page) on Thu, Dec 19, 02 at 11:20
This isn't the answer to your question but be sure to save the bones and the next night, you can have Devilled Beef Bones for dinner. Rub bones with cut garlic cloves, then sprinkle with Worcestershire sauce and rub it in. Spread on both sides with a spicy good-quality prepared mustard. Roll ribs in fine dry bread crumbs. Bake at 400 degrees for about 15-20 minutes or until crumbs form a crispy coating and meat is warmed through. Serve with plenty of napkins.

We cook our meat on the rare side. If there happens to be a slice leftover I'll put it on a hot grill or cast iron pan just long enough to warm it up without cooking it too much more. Love, love Prime Rib!

David


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Socks, not a big problem.

Go to the chart I linked and determine how done is your steak.

Let's say it is midieum rare, that is a 135 F temperature

Now get a big pot of water and heat it up to 135 F. Put you thinly sliced steat and sauce, if you have sauce, into a zip lock bag into the 135 F water for a few minutes. You will have very nice hot steak without overcooking the meat.

You may need to put a spoon or knife into the bag, otherwise the bag may not be submerged into the hot water.

dcarch


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Foodsonastump--thanks for the link.

Lakeguy, there was only one bone, and believe me, DH took care of that right away!

dcarch--thanks for that idea.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

Has anyone cooked their roast with a bunch of long framing nails driven into the meat? I wonder if the nails would conduct heat into the interior.

I wanted to mention, you can buy hypodermic needles and syringes (mail-order works) and inject interesting stuff into the meat. Wine, liquors. infused oil, clarified butter, whatever is interesting. Inject slowly, it takes awhile for the tissue to absorb the liquid.

Not the purist approach, but fun.


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RE: How to cook this beef roast, ribeye bone-in

John,

There is no traditional way of making good beef.
Well, may be the caveman's way is more traditional. :-)

Experimentation will one day surprise you with the most amazing recipe.

A framing nail will help heat conduction, but not much due to the fact that the cross sectional area of a nail is small to conduct heat, and the meat's poor conductivity. That's why sometime ago I posted the use of heat pipe, which for the same size, it conducts more heat than just pure metal. If you take apart your laptop CPU chip, you will see that heat pipe is used to dissipate heat away from the CPU before it burns up.

Injecting seasoning into meat is a great way to play with food, but keep this in mind, at 125 F to 135 F rare interior meat temperature, that is not hot enough to kill all nasty germs. So make sure you keep every thing thoroughly sanitized.

dcarch


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