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Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

Posted by Enoch_PDX (My Page) on
Fri, Oct 14, 11 at 14:13

We just installed brand-new interior doors and one of them is slightly warped to the point that the bottom corner hits the jamb first and doesn't allow the door to close unless you actively push the knob - it's about 1/2" from latching when allowed to rest passively against the jamb.

The contractor is suggesting that this is acceptable and "industry standard." Is that the case?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

No it isn't. Have him replace it.


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

Thanks for getting back to me - is there any documentation/standard anywhere I can refer to when talking with our contractor?


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

window and door manufacturers of america.


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

You could always say, would you accept this in your house?


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

Actually everything so far has been top notch. It is a knotty alder three panel craftsman that was unfinished when it was first hung, and we noticed it didn't close right. They said that it would be fixed after staining, but it still wasn't.

The GC has been very accommodating to our other punch list items, so it seemed a bit unusual that they might balk at this. They were going to check with the door subs and see if it is "industry standard." I'm just trying to do a little research on my own...


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

Sounds more like an incorrect install to me.

Example:

Sheet rock/framing is off 1/4" at the bottom(next to the problem). When installing the frame, it was installed to match the sheet rock, which altered the door frame. That caused the bottom of the frame to be 1/4" off---which translates to 1/2" at the latch.

Wat to check is to use a level at least 6 feet long set against the door stop part of the frame in the position as the door would be when closed. I'm betting the bubble is off.

Fix? Reinstall the bottom portion of the frame to straight in relation to the door.

Actually, that should have been caught and fixed before the trim was installed. I've seen that problem and fixed it during an install several times. It takes longer, but prevents situations like the one you have now.


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

****From earlier E-mail communication****

Sure, tell him it doesn't work right. Either the jamb is out of whack or the door is tweaked. Was the door unfinished? or finished? Did it ever work right? Is there evidence of shoddy workmanship? What is his position? How does he explain it? Do you owe him any money? How far is the job along? Who actually did the work? Do you have any photos? Do you have a level?
Richard
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The door should have been made right before going to the next step. I suspect the door had not acclimated to your location or the installation was not correct. This is the reason I asked if you had a level. With a level we could have checked to see if it was the door or the jamb that was at fault. You can still do that if you can find a 3-4 ft. level. If the door was made elsewhere, in a different climate or if the weather has been damp or extra dry in your area, then that may have contributed to the problem. Painting or sealing the door prior to having the moisture equilibrate to your location can cause a problem. If the material of the door had not moisture equilibrated before the door was manufactured, the door might change shape as it dried. All of these things need to be checked to see what might be at fault. But in my estimation the fault lies with either the installer or the manufacturer and they need to make it right. The GC is just, or should be, your proxy is seeing that the quality is up to your standards.
Richard


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

Thanks to everyone - I will get a level and check on the door when I get a chance.


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

Just as an FYI in order to get it warrantied by the mfr if it truly is warped the door must be finished, meaning painted or properly sealed all six sides. Meaning top bottom edges and both faces.


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

This is a good point - I don't know for sure if the door is warped or the frame is not straight. I will have to put a level of both when I get a chance.


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RE: Brand new interior door is warped - is this acceptable?

So apparently the wall and door frame were not truly vertical, so the solution was to move the lowest hinge 1/4" away from door, allowing the door to close naturally. After all was said and done, everything was resolved to our satisfaction.

Thanks for all of the advice and input!


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