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Stain bleeding thru paint

Posted by wangshan (My Page) on
Sat, Feb 16, 13 at 22:10

I stripped these french doors , they were painted white when I moved in. I tried to repaint them, but even with a "stain blocking" primer , blotches of a orange stain kept coming thru. I didn't want to keep putting layers of paint on, as that was why I stripped them in the first place. So now I am stripping them again, but I want to avoid the stain bleed thru. How can I tell if I got all the stain out ? How can I avoid any coming thru ? It's hard to tell from this picture, but there is stain coming thru all over, not just in one spot.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Stain bleeding thru paint

No picture, but after stripping, did you completely wash off all the stripper?

Once stain is dry, it seldom leeches out of the wood. And which 'stain blocking primer' did you use and why did you use it?


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RE: Stain bleeding thru paint

It was a few years ago, but 1) not sure if I washed it all off, 2) probably zinser.
Let me try to post a pic again


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RE: Stain bleeding thru paint

You probably used a water based primer. You need the stinky shellac primer.


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RE: Stain bleeding thru paint

ok, by shellac, do you mean oil based ? Can you give me a brand name ? Then I would have to use oil paint topcoat , right ?


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RE: Stain bleeding thru paint

Difficult to tell, but that looks like it might be orange stripper residue.

BIN, made by Zinnser is a water based(or oil) shellac stain blocking primer. Bullseye 123 is also shellac based, but is designed thicker for exterior use.

Once BIN is dry, any top coat may be used.

I'd strip all that off and clean the stripper well(directions on cleaning it off are on the container. Once the old material/new stripped are completely off and the wood is completely dry, prime with BIN and finish with whatever paint you choose---following the directions on the BIN and paint cans.


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RE: Stain bleeding thru paint

If your house was built between 1910 and 1920, it probably has the doors stained "blood-red" mahogany, with aniline dye. The dye will bleed through shellac, lacquer, acrylic and oil. The key would be to strip and bleach the wood with peroxide wood bleach which will remove the red stain. Failing that, a coat of shellac followed by oil primer is the best ameliorative.
It's actually worse when you strip the doors, removing the clearcoat, then paint right on the stain, because you have tapped a fresh vein of dye, which all of the solvents (including water) bring to the surface.
Casey


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RE: Stain bleeding thru paint

@Casey l I think that's got to be it. The color coming up (even as I restrip it) is way way darker than the orange stripper, darker than any stain I've seen elsewhere in this house. My house was built in 1905. It makes sense now , because what the po did was just paint over everything, thank goodness not ALL the woodwork was painted. But the clear top coat was what probably prevented it from coming thru BEFORE I went and stripped it down to the wood.Oh, holy smokes !

BTW , I did use BIN over it the first time, and no that is not stripper coming thru. I 'm sure I cleaned it with something and also lightly sanded it.

This post was edited by wangshan on Mon, Feb 18, 13 at 11:48


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RE: Stain bleeding thru paint

I finally got around to restripping, bleaching, shellacing and painting the french doors that were aniline dyed. They are white!! No more bleed thru!!! Thank you Casey !

Here is a link that might be useful: staked the heart of the aniline vampire


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