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Electrical Wiring for dishwasher and two plugs in kitchen

Posted by PMS11 (My Page) on
Mon, Nov 11, 13 at 16:08

I'm looking for a pro opinion here... I recently had a "qualified" electrician install two 20 amp circuits and one 30 amp for a dishwasher and two plugs in my kitchen. I tested the wires meant for plugs and realized that one of the 20s is still hot, even when the breaker is off. (It is somehow connected to the dishwasher breaker/circuit.) I took off the breaker box cover and realized that only TWO yellow #12s are in the box and that one of the 20s is connected to the 30. IS THIS CODE OR LEGAL?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Electrical Wiring for dishwasher and two plugs in kitchen

I've never heard of a 30A (residential) dishwasher. Why was this done?

Anyhow, a 12 gauge wire should not be connected to a 30A breaker. Are you sure (10g which was appropriate for 30A is typically orange).


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RE: Electrical Wiring for dishwasher and two plugs in kitchen

I have never seen a residential dishwasher that needed 30 amps. The 2 20 amp circuits should be completely separate from the dishwasher circuit unless run in the same conduit, breaking out to separate runs they may share an equipment grounding conductor up until that point which the circuits go there separate ways. A #10 equipment grounding conductor is good for 60 amps. Keep in mind in the 2014 NEC dishwashers shall be required to
have GFCI protection due to the increasing number of heater fires.


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RE: Electrical Wiring for dishwasher and two plugs in kitchen

"Keep in mind in the 2014 NEC dishwashers shall be required to
have GFCI protection due to the increasing number of heater fires."
Agreed about the new GFCI requirement for 2014. But the idea that GFCI is for fire prevention is one I never heard before and would like to learn more about it. Can you post links that will expand on that idea?


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RE: Electrical Wiring for dishwasher and two plugs in kitchen

Both dishwasher circuits (hardwired or plug connected) and laundries now require GFCI. However Dudley is completely wrong on why, it has nothing to do with fire and all to do with (as is just about every use of GFCI) electrical shock potential. The argument is the modern electronic controlled dishwashers have a greater potential for failure compared to the old mechanical timered ones.

Other interesting changes are the areas requiring AFCI have been expanded to include kitchens and laundries (previously exempted). Note we are now in the realm where both AFCI and GFCI are required.

All the mention of 600V as the threshold before certain extra requirements exist have been revised upward to 1000V to make accommodation for certain home power (solar, wind) generation.


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RE: Electrical Wiring for dishwasher and two plugs in kitchen

It is noted that "dudley" registered on Monday November 11 and started voluminous posting with some nonsense in each post, but enough truth and substance to mislead the unwary or uninformed.


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