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Appliance Circuites Kitchen Remodel

Posted by wg999 (My Page) on
Tue, Oct 19, 10 at 22:11

Am remodeling kitchen - Does it make sense (not just minimum code) to put micro and dishwasher on same 20 amp circuit? Micro has small amperage rating. Also, am placing six outlets in a desk work area over ten feet away from counters and plumbing - but in kitchen - do these need to be GFI. If GFI outlet doesnt specify # of outlets downstream, is it safe to assume 5 is ok? Thanks for your help.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Appliance Circuites Kitchen Remodel

dw amd mw need seperste recs. dw needs line of sight disconnect. all counter recs must be gfi protected. use a gfi breaker. i prefer to use 2 duplex/ circut. dont have nec next to me like ontariojer.


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RE: Appliance Circuites Kitchen Remodel

"dw needs line of sight disconnect"

not true, you can possibly put a lock off on the breaker, I do it all the time much faster and easier. Check with your AHJ

" use a gfi breaker"

there is no need, GFCI receptacles are fine. It will add significant more cost to use GFCI breakers


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RE: Appliance Circuites Kitchen Remodel

i have seen a 1970's qo gfi breaker that still works today. i have seen a cooper 15a gfi last 2. we replaced it like 3 times.


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RE: Appliance Circuites Kitchen Remodel

"i have seen a 1970's qo gfi breaker that still works today. i have seen a cooper 15a gfi last 2. we replaced it like 3 times."

Do you have any idea what GFCI devices cost?

You can use a single GFCI receptacle (~$10) to protect downstream receptacles.

Two small appliance branch circuits are then $20 for the GFCI receptacles.

I do not recall seeing a GFCI breaker for anything approaching $10.


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RE: Appliance Circuites Kitchen Remodel

All the countertop receptacles need to be GFCI protected, you'll have to check with your local authority as to whether the desk would be considered a countertop by their definition. All the receptacles including the ones on the desk area (with small exception) need to be on two or more 20A circuits shared with (again small exception) NOTHING else. There's no limit on the number of receptacles strung on each circuit or GFCI.

I would generally recommend an additional circuit for the dishwasher and the disposer. As long as the receptacle that these are plugged into is accessible (under the sink is the common placement) disconnecting the plug suffices for the disconnect requirement in most places.

A small countertop microwave usually isn't a problem. I'd definitely go with a dedicated circuit for the larger units.

One thing to do is to check the manual/installation instructions on the various appliances and see what it recommends. If they "REQUIRE" a dedicated circuit, you're obliged to use it. If they recommend it, you should definitely consider highly that recommendations


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RE: Appliance Circuites Kitchen Remodel

a qo gfi breaker costs ~$66. a p&s 20a tr gfi costs ~$13.50. the cb will outlast the gfi.


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RE: Appliance Circuites Kitchen Remodel

"a qo gfi breaker costs ~$66. a p&s 20a tr gfi costs ~$13.50. the cb will outlast the gfi."

I'm sick of this...

Give facts to back it up or STFU, all your doing is spamming the hell out of this board with your opinion. Going around claiming how QO is the second coming of Christ is getting old. Get some actual field experience instead of just putting in some recp's and switches for your friends. In short, smithy, you really have no idea what you're talking about it.
Let's say you are correct (even though you aren't). There are other reasons to put in a recp instead of a breaker, major convenience for one. I personally wouldn't want to have to walk all the way out to my panel to reset a breaker when I could just reset the recp.
There is NOTHING to back up your claims. This is real life and people are looking for real answers to real questions.


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