Return to the Electrical Wiring Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

Posted by johnliu (My Page) on
Sun, Jun 26, 11 at 16:08

I have a quick thing I want to confirm (I think?)

I'm wiring a 20A 120v circuit with several outlets. The first outlet is to be GFCI, the downstream ones are not. It will be more convenient to arrange them as shown below -not in a single series, but in two branches. (Because I can use less conduit, less wire, less bends, don't need to insert a pull point.)

Is this okay?

Photobucket


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

If you connect to the terminals on the GFI that are marked "Load", then your downstream receptacles will be GFI protected. Splice all your wires color to color at the GFI receptacle along with a pigtail that you will attach to the line terminals of the GFI receptacle. This arrangement will keep the downstream receptacles from being GFI protected.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

Bear in mind that electrical cable has some "leakage' through the insulation and with enough length after the GFCI, nuisance tripping can occur. Probably not less than 250' for that problem and the problem of voltage drop can become an issue at lesser lengths.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

are you saying you don't want the downstream outlets to be GFCI protected? because all of them will be unless you do a pigtail at the GFCI box and bypass its protection for downstream outlets.

your layout is fine. make sure your boxes are deep enough for your junctions where there will be 9-12 wires.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

It takes a LOT of insulation to drop the overall resistance to 20,000 ohms to leak 6 mA and trip a GFCI.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

I do want the downstream outlets to be GFCI protected.

Basically the goal was to (1) have conduit cross the ceiling and turn 90 deg down the wall to the first outlet, then go left horizontal and right horizontal like an inverted T. (2) Otherwise, the conduit would cross the ceiling, turn 90 deg left, go to the end of the garage, then turn 90 deg down to the first outlet, then turn right and run horizontal the length of the garage.

The second (2) way has one extra bend, which would be one too many and I'd need a pull point in the middle of the ceiling. And it uses a bit more wire and looks goofy.

I ended up putting the first GFCI outlet in the middle of the ceiling, which is a pull point. I figured it might come in handy. But I still want to save on wire and goofy.

I've never had a garage workshop before, and don't really know what I'll need or want as I work in the space. Oh, I've read the threads here and some magazine articles, but I'm still unsure. So, I'm kind of making sure no spot is more than 6 feet from a 120v 20A outlet. The 240v outlets, I figure I'll add them as I accumulate tools. Starting with just one 240v 20A circuit with a wall outlet for the table saw and a ceiling drop cord. I have room in the panel for two more dual pole breakers.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

"I ended up putting the first GFCI outlet in the middle of the ceiling..."

Sounds like it will be a PITA to push the reset button, let alone test the thing every month or so.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

i agree that the ceiling isn't really an ideal place for a GFCI unless you live in a hobbit house. They need to be accessible in case they trip and for the monthly testing. if you really want an outlet there, i'd think a regular outlet would work better and then add a GFCI downstream. overhead outlets specifically do not need GFCI protection.

i agree that your method 1 of wiring makes the most sense. i would stick with that. the junction where you have a GFCI + two load side connectors is going to be PACKED. technically an extra deep box will hold it but just barely. you might consider using a two gang box instead.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

In my garage, I elected to just use a GFCI receptacle at every box with none of them protecting downstream receptacles. If one trips, identifying and locating the problem is very easy. The garage door operator receptacles in the ceiling are not GFCI.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

Sounds like an application for a GFCI breaker. Protect the whole circuit at the source and you don't have to worry about it downstream.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

"Protect the whole circuit at the source and you don't have to worry about it downstream."

And then you have to go the panel every time it trips.


 o
RE: Outlets Downstream From GFCI In Branches?

Not sure that is worse than getting out a ladder.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Electrical Wiring Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here