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Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

Posted by casey_oakland (My Page) on
Fri, Feb 20, 09 at 14:53

I have a dedicated 20 amp circuit in my kitchen meant for a dishwasher.

Can I run an electrical outlet off that same circuit? I live in Mass if that makes a difference in regards to code?

Ideally i would like to run an AC unit in the summer off that outlet but I can understand if this is not feasible.

Would it be better to jump off a counter top GFI to create the new outlet?

Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

Neither is either legal or adviseable.
The DW is to have its own dedicated circuit, though disposals are often found here, also.
The counter-top circuits are not intended for this purpose, and would probably be overloaded with the AC and almost any kitchen appliance.
The DW and AC running at the same time would also certainly pop the CB.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

Thanks for the info!

I figured as much in regards to the AC Unit : /
Unfortunately running a new dedicated wire for that wouldn't be an option either. It looks like I will need to scrap that idea.

Do you think if i keep the load to standard appliances I would be ok or is this just a major violation?


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

"The DW is to have its own dedicated circuit, though disposals are often found here, also."

Not required by the NEC.
The DW and disposal cannot be on the kitchen counter circuit, but unless the manufacturer requires a separate circuit you could put other outlets on the circuit with the DW (lights, plugs in the basement, etc.).


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

Good call brickeyee.
It may be advisable but not required.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

Mort DWs are actually a small enough lad to easily share with a GD.

The largest load they usually have is the booster water heater installed in them and sometimes the heating element for drying, though many newer units use 'condensation drying.'

They heat the water to a higher temperature, then condense the water vapor evaporating from the dishes on the walls of the unit.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

Thanks All,

I think the issue with adding an outlet as opposed to a hard wired GD is the "unknown" factor. The load from a shared outlet will be determined by what ever is plugged in and seeing this can not be 100% pre-determined i imagine it's best to avoid. Would you agree?


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

If the outlet is under the sink for the GD it is not a "shared outlet."
While it is possible to open the cabinet and plug something in, by simply using a single receptacle instead of a duplex it sort of becomes moot.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

Thanks Brickeyee,

I appreciate your feedback..

The thing is, for me the original intention of extending off the DW outlet was to add an aditional recepticle in the kitchen area for use with other things / not the GD. My current setup has the GD seperat from the DW so that isnt really a problem for me. I did find out from another forum and researched a DW manufacturer instalation specs that it is (recomended) that the DW be on it's own circuit / with the posibility of sharing with a GD with a 20a dedicated circuit. Nothing mentioned however for sharing with another recepticle.

hmmmm?


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

"manufacturer instalation specs that it is (recomended) that the DW be on it's own circuit"

Recommended is not the same as required.
Look at the power the unit actually draws.
20 A is massive overkill.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

unfortunately i dont have the unit yet so i am not exactly

sure.. Do you know what the average draw is?
I guess it would also depend on what i'm pluging into the other outlet as well which again is another big unknown.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

"unfortunately i dont have the unit yet so i am not exactly"

Should be on the spec sheet for the unit.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

looks like average for DW is 10-15 amps according to this..
> http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...0134956AAjY94K
May not be all that accurate / but i'm sure it's close.

I was told on another forum that the DW cannot be more than 10 amps otherwise you should not share the circuit or i'll start blowing it. So, to play it safe i guess should do without.. ?


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For the record

In Canada, it needs its own circuit. Curiously in my slightly out of date BC book (a national code is coming) it says you can use 14ga/15amp if you know the dw can handle it. Sounds silly to me. Otherwise it's a separate 20/12ga circuit, and I presume a special plug, or is it hardwired? Never could understand the logic in that.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

I always install an outlet for the dishwasher and then use a cord from the dishwasher to the outlet. I really cant stand installations where romex simply comes out of a hole in the wall and is then wired to the dishwasher.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

JMVD, I like the way you think. This may be a voltage thing but in Australia/NZ (240/50) all dishwashers come with a plug, and the code expects an outlet in the nook for it.

It does seem crazy since I assume the power hookup is in the back, so you have to pull the dishwasher out to get to it? If so, kind of contradicts the code itself as to how romex can generally be used, would it not?


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

"It does seem crazy since I assume the power hookup is in the back, so you have to pull the dishwasher out to get to it?"

Every DW I have ever seen for residential use has the power input connections in the front of the unit and easily accessible without removing the unit.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

Everything that I have seen is in the front as well.

The main reason I do not like romex being wired directly to a DW is that it gets bent, kinked, scraped and crushed whenever the unit is moved in and out. A regular appliance cord on the other hand is much more flexible and damage resistant than regular NM.


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RE: Does a Dishwasher need it's own dedicated circuit?

I checked the specs on the inside of my 3 year old DW,
and it shows that the motor takes 1.8A, the element 4.5A; total 6.3A. The DW is on a dedicated 15A circuit. Would it not be possible to run a separate circuit (not off outlet for DW) for an outlet in another room? Thx.


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