Return to the Electrical Wiring Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
lighting question

Posted by lzrj (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 23, 10 at 9:44

Im about to install some under cabinet lighting. When we built the house the wiring was installed for it then. There is a wall switch and four areas under the cabinets that wires come out from.

My question is, should that wire be one continuous big loop or does each wire that come out from the walls separate from each other. Im assuming its one big loop and if it is, will nine of these light be any problem to run in line with each other. They are 120v and each bulb is 20w. Since there is two separate wires in the main cord loop, is both wires positive where I just hook one wire to one of the wires going in the light and then the other wire in the light connect to the next light and then back into the other wire on the loop. And how to I know if Im hooking the next set of lights to the same wire as the previous ones.

My wording is probably confusing but if anyone can give me any advice here about how to wire this. I included a picture of the lights and one of the wires under the cabinets.

Photobucket

Photobucket


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: lighting question

The light kit you have shown is not intended to be hard wired to the circuit. Those lights need to be plugged into an outlet.


 o
RE: lighting question

I was just going by what the guy at Lowes told me. He said as long as they are 120 they could be hard wired. How do I know then what lights can be hard wired and which ones can't.


 o
RE: lighting question

I also went to the special lighting center who was going to sell me the same type of puck lights (just not in the whole kit, only the lights) after I explained to them how I was going to wire them. So why could you not hard wire them if they get plugged into a 120 outlet either way? Im not up on electric work so Im trying to get educated.


 o
RE: lighting question

The confusion comes from the use of the term "hard wired". It appears that different people mean different things. Most people here would mean that that a "hard wired" device can not be unplugged.

How are those cables in your picture terminated?


 o
RE: lighting question

I have those lights in a cabinet at my house. The connection is a little slide mechanism. There are 2 sharp, metal blades in a plastic channel. You slide the cable in and the mechanism pushes the blades through the insulation and they contact the wire.

Also of note, those lights get HOT!!! I would not put them anywhere you might accidentally touch them.


 o
RE: lighting question

IONIZED, i believe the wire runs in a loop from the light switch on the back splash, out and then back into the wall at the four different locations and then ends back at the switch.

BILLL, I know how they connect if I was just using the whole kit, but I will not be using the plug ins and junction box that comes with it. Only the lights. And wiring the lights to the wires already under the cabinets.

Just need someone with a little electrical knowledge to help me out on connecting these lights and how it should be done correctly.


 o
RE: lighting question

These lights are not designed to be connected how you want to connect them. You should not do it.

If you general, if you want to wire proper lights in this location, you will have 2 cables going to each location. You join the 2 blacks to the black from the fixture. You join to the 2 whites to the white for the fixture. You join the 2 grounds to whatever grounding the fixture has. The final light in the chain will only have 1 cable. You just connect the 1 black to the 1 black etc. All the junctions would be contained in the fixture.

Again though, these lights are not designed to do this. There are no wires from the pucks that you will easily be able to use to connect them to your existing wiring. Even if there were, you would be left with exposed wiring. You would have to open up the pucks and soldier wire to them. That is not a proper way to install under cabinet lighting. If you are really interested in " how it should be done correctly," step 1 is to buy fixtures that are designed for the application.


 o
RE: lighting question

Thanks Billl, I will look into getting different lights.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Electrical Wiring Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here