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Help! New outlets aren't captive

Posted by jsol (My Page) on
Fri, Feb 5, 10 at 9:16

I just had my kitchen renovated and my electrician put 2 1 outlet receptacles in for a dishwasher and disposer. The problem is that the plugs fit in very loosely. So occassionally the dw or disposer won't work unless I reseat the plug. This is very problematic with the dishwasher as it is behind the unit and very hard to get at. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Help! New outlets aren't captive

It seems odd that your "electrician" wouldn't instantly realize there was something amiss when he plugged in the appliances. Try checking the sockets for tightness with something else like a toaster plug that works normally in one of the other kitchen sockets. If it is loose too, he has got some 'splainin' to do. You could also head for Home Depot etc, and find the same plug and socket, connect them to see if the fit is loose and ask staff why. The answer could be interesting. If the fit is tight, your sockets at home should be replaced posthaste.


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RE: Help! New outlets aren't captive

Either worn receptacles or bent plugs.

If the receptacles are snug with other plugs, try bending the flat blades on the plus outwards a little.


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RE: Help! New outlets aren't captive

Thanks. The receptacles are brand new. The electrician didn't plug the appliances in as the plumber was the last to do his thing. Everything fits snugly in the other (new) receptacles he put in. The only difference is these are single outlet receptacles--I know that shouldn't matter. Also, is the left blade typically positive? Thanks for the suggestions. I have a call into the Electrician...


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RE: Help! New outlets aren't captive

"Also, is the left blade typically positive?"

Positive and negative have no meaning in alternating current (AC) systems.

The voltage changes from positive to negative 60 times per second.

If you are looking at a standard 120 volt plug, with the grounding pin (D shaped hole) on the bottom, the left (larger slot) opening is neutral (0 volts to the ground pin) and the right (smaller slot) slot is the hot (alternating between +120 volts and minus 120 volts relative to the ground and neutral pins 60 times per second).


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RE: Help! New outlets aren't captive

The simplest thing to do is the spread the blades apart a little. This should make it tight enough to go in and stay.


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RE: Help! New outlets aren't captive

Thanks weedmeister. That's the answer I was hoping for


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RE: Help! New outlets aren't captive

I was told if the plug doesn't stay in and the prongs on the plug aren't solid to pry them open a little bit, enough you can see light between the two sections of blade. I heard this was better than spreading the plug apart so the plug makes a better connection and will hold shape better if pulled and plugged back in numerous times. I know either works and the best solution if it is a real problem is to replace the outlet.


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