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Wiring a Set of Adjacent Fixtures

Posted by baumgrenze (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 8, 11 at 1:01

I am wiring a set 8 of up-facing light fixtures on top of a kitchen cabinet. Does it make any real difference if I leave the supply wires uncut and carefully strip enough insulation to allow me to attach the fixture with a wire-nut, or can I cut the supply wire to length and wire from fixture to fixture, tying in the fixture and the wire to the next fixture?

Thanks,

baumgrenze


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Wiring a Set of Adjacent Fixtures

I'm confused. If you're not going to cut the wire, how on earth are you going to get a wire nut on it.


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RE: Wiring a Set of Adjacent Fixtures

I'm confused also. SOunds like he may wants to daisy chain them together but is asking about parallel wiring.


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RE: Wiring a Set of Adjacent Fixtures

I was afraid this would be unclear. I tried hard to avoid the 'well defined' terms "series" and "parallel."

It is a bit more work, but I can run the hot and neutral leads through the entire string of fixtures, then remove a long enough segment of insulation so that I can fold back the wire and twist it with the appropriate fixture lead and cap it with a wire-nut. This approach leaves the wiring intact.

I asked mostly to learn how a licensed electrician would approach the problem, whether the idea of the last fixture being connected to the switched outlet through eight successive wire-nuts is considered poor practice or acceptable practice. Think of it in terms of connecting a circuit by means of back-wiring through a DIY receptacle. I know that this is done, but that it is considered poor practice.

I hope this clears up any ambiguity in my original post.

Thanks,

baumgrenze


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RE: Wiring a Set of Adjacent Fixtures

I'm not a pro, but I can't imagine one doing what you describe, and I wouldn't do it myself. It would take way too much time.

When properly applied (meaning good and tight), a wirenut makes a solid, reliable splice. There is nothing wrong with using multiple splices in a run like you describe.


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RE: Wiring a Set of Adjacent Fixtures

I understand stripping back a piece of uncut wire. What I don't understand is how you envision getting a wire nut on that. There's NO way a conventional "wire nut" is going to do that. There may be other connectors that could be placed on a running splice like that, but that escapes me (other than certain insulation displacement type things designed for cordage).


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