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Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Posted by enigmaquandry (My Page) on
Mon, Aug 2, 10 at 1:22

Hey everyone! I have been looking for a reasonable farmhouse table and haven't found anything so far. Since we NEED a table I've decided to make one, I hope that I've found some reclaimed wood from old barn siding and of course I could get the timbers from Lowes or somewhere.

My issue is, I like the X-leg style of table (linked below), while i think I've figured out how it's put together, I'm a little skeptical about its integrity. Does a style like this just put all the weight and stress on one point? I mean, joining the two planks weakens them already since they have half of them chiseled out right there but then to have the mortise and tenon right through the middle...is that too much?

I know this is not the expertise of this forum, I'm sorry if this is too out of place...I did post on the woodworking forum but I don't think anyone's been on there since July

Here is a link that might be useful: X-leg table


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Haven't got time now, but I'll describe how to build that this afternoon.

Jay


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Have you considered the comfort of people at the ends of the table, coming up against the X all the time when they want to stretch out?


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Enigma, like Larke points out, the style of the X-leg is most suitable in a spot where you don't want anyone seated at either end.

My DH made a trestle based table. It stuck out further on the ends than the base. Later on, he cut the ends and hinged them so they could drop down unless needed for extra seating.It is currently in a basement room where I and my littlest granddaughter do our artwork. I love that table.

Maybe something like this could be done with your X-legged base? That way, when you like, the drop leaf could be raised.

Isn't it nice to have someone as capable as Jay to give us the benefit of his experience?


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

flgagoygle, I'm looking forward to it!

larke, I think either there would be no one at the head and foot (just everyone on the sides) or I could extend the top of the table further so that person would have enough space...


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oops!

moccasin, I guess I took a really long time to post, I didn't see you there! It is great that people here are so helpful and knowledgeable on SO many things!

I like the idea of having the option of putting on drop leaves...I love that your husband made that table, I think tables are so sweet when they're homemade :)


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

To make a table like the one in the link, you make legs, well, in an 'X' configuration. You would start with two pieces with the appropriate angle cut on each end, overlap and fasten them where they cross. This will of course result in an uneven set of legs. You make shorter filler pieces (4 total for each set of legs) and fasten them on either side, Now you have a double-thickness 'X', ready to attach at the top. Depending on what you start with, it could be a heavy set of legs, or fairly light. Even 1X boards will be more than strong enough, though, since you have a solid uninterrupted piece for each leg. 2X material would add up to an actual 3" thick if you want that heavy a look.

The trick is trying to find nice enough wood. If you plan to paint it, any lumberyard material will do, but if it is to be stained and varnished, you'll want better wood, and it will get expensive. I bought Sapele Mahogany to make 2 bench seats and some trim for my small boat, and it was about $200!

I think I would use lumberyard 2X's, and make it intentionally rustic. I'd nail the top planks down with forged-head nails (tremont nail) and go for a rough and ready appearance, rather than trying to make fine furniture out of it. I would certainly go that route to make a practice table, which you could use outdoors if it was too rugged for the kitchen. One problem with 2X stock is that the edges have a slight radius or broken edge, so when you laminate it all together, it won't look like one piece of wood- you'll see an obvious seam. The answer would be to trim the boards down a hair to remove the rounded edge, but you'd need a table saw to do a good job of that.

I would mount the X's to a stringer at the top, to which your top planks would be fastened, and make a stretcher for the bottom (actually, right at the 'X') To make a stretcher, take a board and trim the ends narrower to make a tongue. Cut a corresponding rectangular hole where you want it to come through the leg assembly. Make the tongue long enough to stick through, plus adequate room for a wedge, which goes through a hole in the tongue.

The key to making furniture is very accurate joints, and a good wood glue (I use Tite Bond). A table like this could be made using a motorized miter saw, which are fairly inexpensive, plus you'll need some clamps, and a drill. You'll also need a wood chisel to make square holes out of round ones, and of course a hammer. You have to be careful to remove ANY glue which drips or squeezes out when you assemble a joint. Otherwise, when you stain it, the spot of glue will be white and un-stained. The only cure is to sand it out and re-stain, so be sure you get it right the first time.

With the right tools, this table would be an easy weekend project, the actual construction only taking a few hours. You could make it all with hand tools and spend much more time- that's up to you.

I know this is a lot of information, and if drawings would help, I'll put some together this week to try to show what I'm trying to explain.

Jay


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questions

Jay, thank you so much for such a detailed description, I really appreciate it!

I read it very carefully and I really think that I totally understand what you are saying. I have a couple of questions, at the beginning when you say "You would start with two pieces with the appropriate angle cut on each end, overlap and fasten them where they cross"...how would you "fasten" them best? Is there brackets you would use or screws? Also, I understand what you're saying about the legs and using the extra pieces to make them even, but would it work just as well to cut an angled notch (1/2 the thickness) out of each larger piece (maybe a 4X4) so they fit together? Lastly, what is the best way of keeping these style legs from "collapsing"? I'm just thinking, since the top will be very heavy and have to support large meals etc. what is keeping the legs from just falling flat with the joint in the middle (I may not be explaining this well...you know how tables with legs like this are usually collapsible? How do you keep it from splaying out?).

Thank you so so so much!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

i was gonna suggest you google a woodworking site were they go thru the process with you.

Guess you don't need to google it now... lol!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

The link you posted looks like the legs were made from thick wood and notched out. Either way is just as strong, but you would need a table saw with a dado head to cleanly notch it out, or become an expert with a chisel. I suppose with a template, a plunge router would work as well. It's also harder to find thicker wood that isn't pressure treated.

As for fastening the middle, you could just glue it and clamp until dry. Really- the glue is stronger than the wood. You could certainly use screws or nails in addition to the glue. The 'X' can't spread, because it is firmly attached to the stringers at the top. The stringers are transverse pieces of wood that you nail the top to. If the top of the 'X' can't spread, neither can the bottom. You could screw and glue the legs on, or even bolt them for a more industrial look. Once you build the legs, you'll be amazed at how strong they are.

Another thing I thought of if you don't want a wood stretcher would be to buy some 1/2" threaded rod at Home Depot, and put nuts on the inside and outside where the rod goes through the leg assembly. You could cut a piece of pipe to slip over the threaded rod for a smoother appearance. Painted a satin black, it would have a certain medievel charm.

To be continued......


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Just a little suggestion for using old barn wood. When you cut and/or use new wood, an aged process can be used to make all look the same and not have new raw edges.

Regardless of the type of wood, this mixture will age it as it would be naturally.

One quart of dark vinegar in a glass jar, two to four steel wool pads (the number determines the depth of aging). Let it set for 24 hours. Test on scrap wood. If it turns too dark, just add water. You can finish all with normal sealants once it is dry.

This mixture can be used on any wood to age it. Actually interesting to see the changes occur.


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

I had posted in the ww forum too. The table in the image you posted lacks lateral support and an "X-brace" would be better. Do you know what type of wood it is?

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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Ana White has a plan for a table like that. I love her blog and her designs are made for the non-builder.

Knock-Off Wood, X-table


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

I had been considering what seems to me to be a simpler style (since all I have is a jigsaw, chopsaw and hacksaw) joined by bolts instead of mortise and tenon...I couldn't find a good picture so I threw this togeether as a side and front view, would this be better? I like the look of both tables.

Hi EQ,

Followed you back here from the ww forum. I would stick with the X style leg with a modified (x) stretcher. The chop saw is the only power tool you really need although you do need someone to rip a few pieces of your boards with a table saw for the table edge... or you can cut them by hand and square them up with a hand planer. IMO It would also look better in your home. Most of the work you want to do should be done by hand anyway. For about $100± you can get a decent quality japanese pull saw, a marking gauge, a mortice and tenon saw and a hand planer. Power tools are too unforgiving and especially working with reclaimed lumber that is not usually squared up or readily available you want to take it a bit slow although when you get the hang of it and things are marked out properly you will be surprise how quickly it goes. The X table has 4 identical legs a 2 identical cross braces. Do you know what kind of would it is? Is it pine, oak or chestnut? Can you post some pictures of it?


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Wow, I'm astounded at the wealth of knowledge! Thank you SO much everyone!
Jey that is an amazing set of instructions, I totally get it! I hopefully will get the wood next week and can get started on this project! I will have to try to find the tools that you mentioned...would a bolt work just as well for those joints just in case? I don't mind the hand work, I think I would prefer it to the noisy power tools anyway. I'm not sure what the wood is yet, I have a choice between several materials in an old barn, the siding, flooring etc. I haven't seen it though. I'm still a little torn between the two designs, I want to make sure my table doesn't turn out looking like a picnic table...I really like them both, is either more suited for beginners or stronger than the other one?

marti8a, thank you for the link! I had found her "skinny farmhouse table" but I hadn't found this one!

flgargoyle, I'm shocked to hear the glue is so strong! I wasn't even sure I would use it but I sure will now! (just shows how much I know :)

emagineer, I have heard of something like this and I'm so glad you brought it up! I'm sure there will be some fresh cut ends that will not look right and this sounds like the PERFECT solution! Thank you!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

hi enigma, well this is way beyond my knowledge and woodworking skills but I *love* the table style and I can't wait to see some pics of it. please keep us updated on this!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Thanks EQ,

In the world of salvage and reclaimed lumber often times the availability of material will dictate the design. When you look at the material keep in mind the dimensions. If there are no 4"± posts available your decision will be made for you. You can make either table look like a picnic table with improper joinery techniques and likewise can make either design into fine furniture.

Bolts can be used and creatively hidden for either design but on both tables the weakest joint is where the legs meet the table. The X table's joint is strengthened by the "X" stretcher and the other is a type of a pocket joint. The second tables stretcher would be decorative only and can be moved or removed. You may find yourself saying "get your feet off the table" in your sleep after a while.

When you get the materials and make your decision track me down and I can help you with the details.

Depending on the age of the barn and the species of wood the siding material is often the best looking for it's radical grains and textures but hardest to work with because of this if it has not been re-milled but there are a few simple jigs you can make to make your joints true and square to each other.

All the tools are very common and even the Japanese pull saw should be available at your local HW store these days. It is probably the largest investment on the list and a tool no box should be without. I used to even keep one n the kitchen.

A few large clamps would also be in order but I would try to borrow some from someone as they are outrageously expensive. The ones I would recommend are about $50±. For gluing up the table top you would need a number of good bar clamps but you could probably find a friend who has some or a small woodworking shop that will assist you in this task for a minimal fee. Get on the phone and start asking around. You can also make your own so don't be discouraged. Get the materials and let me know what you have to work with.

Jey


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Thank you! I will let you know as soon as I have the materials! I'm going to Lowes tonight and I will look for these tools...I do have a friend in construction, maybe he has some clamps I can use.

I'm so excited to get started, I wish I could start right away!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Enigma, I was over in the Gallery side, and ran across Jey_L's drawings for the table posted there.

By tracking them in the gallery, perhaps we can find our photos much quicker. I'll give you the link to it below.

However, I still do not know how to use the gallery. Do all of our pictures get shunted over there? Or must be upload them here as well as there?

The farm table is included in the "deck" section, as are the drawings Jey_L made for my derelict garage. Great job he did too.

Here is a link that might be useful: Gallery...farm table construction


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Hi EQ, ML'

Just stopping by as I noticed a new comment. I use the Gallery because I don't use the other photo hosting sites. Everything I have posted is under decks because the only two option are deck and kitchen (which I only noticed after I posted) the rest are holiday topics and you can't create or even suggest a new topic.
I just post the images there, copy their address and use ‹ img src="url" alt="some_text" /› to place them in the message.


some_text


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

I have to admit, the galleries are still a mystery to me. I'm a little intrigued by the above drawing though, is that the one for moccasin's garage?


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Thank you EQ,

No that is for this post which seems to have been abandoned.

Have you gotten your wood yet? I was at Lowe's the other day and they had some Japanese saws that were very reasonable. I would get both for the $30± dollars they were asking as one was a dovetail saw which would be perfect for the small accurate cuts. I will have to go back there tomorrow afternoon so I will get the mfg and model numbers for you.


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sigh

jey, I have NOT been able to get my wood yet! It's very frustrating but the person with the wood is extremely hard to get ahold of and nail down a time to go get it. I'm hoping it won't take too much longer!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Sounds to me like you're getting the barn board from a farmer? Good luck with that.

Seriously though if it is a farmer, regardless of what type of farming they do they don't make their own schedules. They are at the mercy of Mother Nature and Murphy. When Mother Nature says the corn is ready for chopping Murphy says "yeah but you need to fix the chopper first" and that part is no longer available so get out the torches and the anvil and catch me on the flip side while Mother Nature douses the nice windrows of second cutting you just finished raking this morning. BTW did I mention I broke the tedder for you this mornin'?

By the time your fist born graduates college you will have your kitchen table.

Just kidding.

If it is a farmer though you have to be creative. If they know who you are and why you're rummaging through their property they usually won't mind. Just don't say "I'm from the government and I'm here to help you". For the most part they are good people to know and good people to do business with. You'll never get steamship round or prime rib from the grocer's machine for 69 cents a pound.

When you do get it if you don't see me around I believe you can send me an email through iVillage by clicking on my name and and selecting "send an email".


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Woe...

Jey, your post made me laugh out loud :) I'm not sure if he's a farmer but he DOES own a barn, unfortunately he's under a force even more unpredictable than murphy...the government :) All he wants is to tear his own barn down on his own property but there is some legislation that he has to go through before he can do it legally. I have no idea if we'll be able to get wood from him this year, if ever!

We're getting desperate for a table, I've been thinking about just making a table out of wood from Lowes and banging it with stuff to make it look aged...does anyone do that? Like cedar or untreated pine planks?

I have no idea, I also have changed my mind a little bit about the style, I think a simpler, trestle design might be easier and a little more timeless. The link below is to a pottery barn bench that I like, only as a table :) I've also been trying to think of a simpler way to construct it than mortise and tenon...i once saw a table that was held at the joints with what looked like lag bolts. Would something like that work? I love the idea of the beautiful, traditional joinery, but I've been very limited these last couple months by some health issues and am looking for a simpler option in the end.

Sigh :)


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oops!

i forgot the link...

Here is a link that might be useful: pottery barn bench


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finally!!!!!

Ok, so the wait was too long for the reclaimed wood and I couldn't take it any more so we bought the materials and got started! We're just building it out of untreated pine lumber.

So far we have the legs built, the apron, and supports and are working on the top. The pattern that I'm using is one from Knock off wood... there are styles that I prefer but in a pinch this was a simple and fairly clear-cut solution.

I'm really enjoying myself, I expect to be finished tomorrow hopefully, I'll post pictures!

Here is a link that might be useful: farmhouse table plans


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Enigma, you go girl!!
There is a thrill in making it yourself that cannot be beat.
I cannot saw a straight line, much less draw one, so I always have the caulking and wood filler standing by.


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Hi EQ,

I've been trying to reply for a few days. Not sure what's up with these forums. I was only able to post images to the galleries and not comment and now I can comment but my images don't show up.

Too bad on the lumber but it will be great anyway. Can't wait to see the pics.


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Hey, Jey_L....I'll check the gallery for your uploads. Missed seeing you around.


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yay, here it is!!!!!!!

Ok, so we've been working on this every day since Sunday evening. It's not completely finished yet as I haven't put a sealant on it but everything else is done and I LOVE IT! I love everything about it because my sweetie and I made it!

Please excuse the staining paraphernalia flung around :)

From online

My only issue now is what to seal it with? I really don't want a gloss, or even a satin finish, I want it to be as matte as possible but still seal it well...any thoughts?


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

I love it enigma! great work!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

oh man that is one beautiful table!!!

have no idea what to seal it with but i like the idea of a matte finish!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Wow! What a great job!

The secret is to build a finish, using gloss, and sanding between coats, then finish with a matte varnish, or de-gloss it with fine steel wool. Alternately, you could go with a tung oil finish. which is even easier.


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Hi EQ,

Looks great-!!

I've been busy digging out my gardens and getting ready to move. I replaced my hard drive about a week or so ago and hadn't been able to post but a few comments in the interim. I usually don't use automatic software updates but this time I did and it installed Safari 5.0.1 which apparently had an issue with web forms. Didn't discover that till yesterday afternoon and then they had some site maintenance so I'm not sure where the problem was. I sent an email to iVillage after posting a few things this AM about the gallery and it appears to be working now.

If I were going to seal it I prefer tongue oils myself but am not too fond of the newer products on the market and usually just use oils and wax.


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Here is a thread from the HDF, someone is finishing their table as you are.

Here is a link that might be useful: Table finish


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Enigma, that is a beautiful table. Love the design, and you did a fantastic job putting it together. It will give you pleasure to view it AND to use it!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

that is beautiful!


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Thank you!

Thank you so much everyone! Especially Jay and Jey for your construction know-how :)...This table is so solid it easily outweighs my husband and you cannot shake it at all. The DH says if it gets caught in a tornado he feels sorry for the bomb shelter it would hit! :)

The color is not quiiiiiiiiiite right, it is a grey-brown that is leaning a little too pinkish (the paint store lady actually put sooooo much tint in it that I had to dilute it a ton just to use it...and then any spots that were softer really absorbed so much stain immediately that it looks like paint. So I'm trying to paint thinner it off a bit or sandpaper it down a bit). I feel like it should be either more silver-grey or richer brown, but I really can't find ANY solution (including the vinegar and steel wool, it turns the pine a very red color) that makes it looks better...I guess I'll keep experimenting.

I actually used tung oil for my butcher block countertops...while it's worked pretty well there I think I'd prefer a more substantial sealant for the table. Jay, I have some very fine steel wool, will that take the gloss out of the polyurethane? Is there a trick to it?

Thanks again :)


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

The vinegar solution has to be used on raw wood. And I probably forgot to say to take the steel wool out (plus any particles left) as it just get stronger. You can add water to dilute down. Just for future reference in case someone wants to age wood.

You have a beautiful table to pass down through the family.


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

OH Your table is Gorgeous. So wonderful that you two built is yourselves.


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

I know it's extra work, but I always recommend making a sample piece to try things out on- stains, finishes, etc. Sure beats having to refinish an entire piece of furniture!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

flgargoyle, truer words were NEVER spoken :)

Strangely I did make a sample of everything first and not once did the sample (exact same stain, application, and wood) turn out even close to the table...VERY strange.

I made an executive decision today that while I LOVE the table, I really don't like the finish...it was too thick, too painty, too streaky, too orange and pinky...

SOOOOOOOOO I began sanding, and sanding, and sanding, aaaaaaaaaaand hours and hours later I am still sanding...the DH is also sanding, thankfully we were able to borrow electric sanders or this would never work out. Since we're going lighter (aka, not gummy painty) EVERYTHING except the knots has to be totally sanded out, down to the clean pine.

I have restained some of the frame and all of the top and I have to say that NOW I LOVE it! Really really, it is much lighter, a silver grey, super reclaimed looking color with nicks and knots standing out really well because of the previous stain soaked in...I think it looks like cypress (which is funny considering it's yellow pine lumber!). I'll post another picture when it's all done...hopefully not too much longer now :)


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Beautful table, enigma--happy to hear that you're liking the new finish. We have several items that my father and my FIL have made--someday you can pass that table on to your child, after many years of enjoyment and memories.


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All done...

Finally, the last bit of finish has been applied, the sanding is done and I have a drying table in the sunroom :) We sanded the whole thing down to the raw pine and re-stained it with a light grey stain that gave it a beautiful, aged finish. Today I just put the satin polyurethane on and it didn't make it too shiny, a liiiiiiittle bit yellower than I had hoped but that's the nature of sealing it I suppose :)

Here's a pic of the final product, the picture didn't turn out very well (it kinda looks like treated lumber...) but I promise it is better :)

From house


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Hi EQ,

Looks great-!! What is the other piece you made? No pics?


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Oh my gosh ... I'm SO envious! That table is AWESOME and I'm so impressed you did it yourself. The finish is perfect. Just perfect.

Big congrats ... that is so cool.


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

What a wonderful table. It is so nice that you and your Dh made it yourselves too. You did a great job.

FlowerLady


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

What a beautiful table! You did a great job!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Thank you everyone! Jey, I'm not quite sure which other piece you're talking about, this is the only thing that we've made so far! It's such a relief to have it DONE, even though we had SO much fun working on it. Now that we know we can do it, hopefully soon we will build more pieces that we need and save some $$$!

Speaking of expensive, there are only three pieces of furniture in our entire house that I bought new, and they are the three end tables in our living room. Every other blessed thing in the whole house is gifted, hand-me-down, garage sale, flea market, antique or curbside. So after we finished the table we had to think about chairs, and I didn't like the idea of benches (for us), or vintage chairs (not matching would begin to look like a flea market in that room, it already has a lot of mismatching), and I didn't like any wooden chairs that I found, so I went ahead and ordered some chairs that I have wanted for as long as I can remember...

From online

They are a different version of the classic Tolix/Marais chair. I'm still experiencing enormous sticker shock, but I can't think of another piece of furniture we'll have to buy...ever...so hopefully it'll even out :) They're supposed to come by the end of next month and I am terrified, hoping that I like them just as much in real life!


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RE: Small farmhouse table, anyone experienced in woodworking?

Hi EQ,

Speaking of "as long as I can remember".. Maybe I just read your post twice and that's why I thought you had made two tables or possibly equated your apple pie recipe with making furniture, who knows. I can almost remember the days when I could remember.

Senility is the "E-Ticket" of life. The un-induced double vision is like the metro bus that that awaits you on every corner. o_O I've never missed a bus in my life but sure do miss being able to see straight. At least with senility you keep forgetting you have it. You can't remember that you can't remember. I used to be able to spot things a mile away and now all I see are spots.

I was reading another post where someone was talking (if I can remember correctly) about miscommunication with contractors and architects and was going to be relaxing with an "adult beverage" and the fist thing that came to mind was "yuk-!", prune juice is not what you want to be drinking if you want to relax. Then it dawned on me... Tequila. I should remember to ask my doctor about that. Not for me but for my friends so they'll talk louder so I could possibly hear them.

I don't think I've ever bought a new piece of furniture that made it through the doors of my house. I have bought some Grants' specials to gift to others knowing the piece it replaced would be tossed to the curb though. It is amazing what people consider garbage. People used to think I made and refinished furniture because I enjoyed it but that was the farthest from the truth. I just like nice things and you could not buy them at G. Fox et al.

So now that your table is done and you're anxious to have some people over for dinner the moment your chairs arrive what's on the menu for the christening?


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hmmmmm

Jey, you made me smile! I'm pretty sure I lost my memory in college, all my friends make fun of me and my husband has to keep track of important events in our lives so I remember them!

I'm not sure what the menu should be...I'm excited to think about it, I definitely think it should include some yummy fresh apple pie though!


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