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Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

Posted by nancynancy (My Page) on
Wed, Jan 18, 06 at 20:49

I started my making my first Roman shade today, and I have a very basic question. When I sew the blackout lining to the other fabric, which way does the rubbery surface go -- against the other fabric or facing the street?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

Facing the street!!!
Kathi


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

Thank you, Kathi.

Nancy


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

Having worked in a professional drapery workroom for many years, I have always been told that the rubbery side faces inside-the fabric side to the street. (Hope this isn't too late-I just joined today)


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

According the a lining supplier I deal with, the rubbery side is supposed to face the street, because it provides better insulation that way, however, most workrooms put the fabric side to the street, because it looks nicer. I think either way is OK.


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

On the ones i bought the rubbery side faced the street!!! That's why i said street.But as shadylady said either would be ok.
Kathi


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

My blackout fabric is white on both sides with a layer of black in between.

Donna


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

I'd probably put the fabric out on the sunny side of the house because I'd be worried that the sun would break the rubber down faster than it would the fabric. How's that for a run-on sentence?


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

I have always been told that from the street you should only see white fabric on windows. That is why expensive drapes are always lined in white. Years ago when I worked at an apartment complex, their leases stated that all drapes, blind, etc. must show white from the street. Good luck.


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

I ended up putting the rubbery side facing the street. Anyway, the shade turned out beautifully. I used an ivory cotton pintuck fabric I got from Ballard Designs. And the window already had a 12 inch upholstered cornice I had made out of the same fabric two years ago. So for less than $100 ($40 for the shade, $60 for the cornice) I have a custom window treatment that would have cost hundreds of dollars if they'd been professionally made.


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

Now that we know which side faces the street, what size needle do we use, which tension setting, etc.


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

I'm doing roman shades with the same kind of lining. Not sure if it is blackout lining, but it's white on both sides with one side rubbery feeling. It seems that both ways are correct, but I am really concerned that if I put the rubbery side out it will crack because my windows face south and get very hot. I wonder if anyone has had any experience with cracking. I had a pair of drapes with this lining and they cracked, but they may also have been rather old.

nancynancy, how are yours holding up to sunlight?


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

I had drapes and separate blackout lining and it lasted at least 20 years for me and one of my sons is now using the lining. My living room window faced south and the dining room window, north. They held up great!
Kathy G in MI


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RE: Blackout lining -- Which side faces the street?

Are you using a lining fabric in addition to the blackout or is the blackout itself serving as the only lining?

Here is a link that might be useful: Nouveau Stitch Home Dec Sewing Forum


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