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Family participation in education

Posted by Arkansasgardenboy (My Page) on
Thu, May 9, 02 at 22:49

I feel this needs to be address more in detail. As previously posted in other threads, I feel it is extremely important to be involved with your children in their education. I am emphasizing this even to a greater degree. Homework was one of the greatest examples of being involved with your child in school and to assist your child through learning in connection with the school.
Key factors are to stay intense about your kid's education. Keep in touch with the teacher. Visit the school often, and help your child on the path of success.
In the following link it is said that family participation in education is twice as influential on learning as family socioeconomic status. This works for all. Those who stand to be benefited the most should reap greater results. The more the teacher knows the children the better she/he should be able to relate to them. The more you get to know your child's teacher the better you should be able to relate to he/she. The following link should help us to expand our line of communication.
http://www.schoolsuccessinfo.org/atschool/index.html

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.schoolsuccessinfo.org/atschool/index.html


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Family participation in education

I suspect you are preaching to the choir here. Most people who read the School Forum already realize the need to "stay intense about your kid's education." The readers and posters here are the type to involve themselves in their children's school, schoolwork, and homework. We are the type who do keep in contact with teachers.

The real question is how can we help people who aren't "intense" but rather ambivilant about their children's education. How can we get the word out to people that even though - the baby has cholic, the chemo is getting to you, you take care of elderly parents, you work two jobs trying to make ends meet, you are in the middle of a messy divorce, you are alchoholic, you are undereducated, or whatever - being involved in your child's education has benefits that are worth you sacrificing for, and that education ISN'T entirely the school's responsibility.


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RE: Family participation in education

Would you like to share some of your experiences of your involement? Results? How were you able to expand your and your children's horizons? How involved are you? How can we get more parents involved? I know in a rural community usually you have alot of involement and many times it centers more on sports (basketball, football, baseball, etc.). There use to be banquets for FFA, FHA, and Sports. Now there may be one awards program for all phases of activities.
I know some churches have work days where members can come and participate. How active is your PTA, PTO, or other school organizations? Successes? Failures? How much pride is in your community, school, etc.?
It seems there are always the "faithful few" who are always carrying the load. How should we try to get more involved? Or is it this way where you are? Shouldn't we be doing more encouraging and relating the benefits? How?


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RE: Family participation in education

I'll share my participation in school...is that what you want? I am looking at title here. For one going to PTA meetings, for two being the Mom that was over all the parties organizing them several times. Helping with carnivals at school. Going on field trips. Repairing old books in the room, fixing the covers and interior as instructed by the school Librarian. At one time watching classes which different teacher had conferences with student's parents in the class I was sub-stituting for about an hr. or however long it took. Helping pick up litter at the school. Of course helping with fund raisers.

You want to know how I helped expand my children't horizons-I would say by taking them places-and reading to them when they couldn't read- themeselves, when they were very young about all types of things in nature, about different countries, and all sorts of things. I think this is why upon entering school their vocabulary was way above normal, also their Skills that had to do with Science and Social Sciences were way about average also. My children's listening skills were high too, at that time. After starting school I helped with reading, I had them check out books from the library. They were in the summer reading program at the library where they were exposed to many books. I kept flash card on Addition, Subtraction, and Multilication tables.
Even though my children took swimming lessons, the teen instuctors-at that time- didn't do a whole lot with them at the "Y" so I ended up teaching them to swim, and spent many summer afternoon with them at the pool at the "Y". I helped in them learning what I considered important, riding a bike.
They also participated in all functions at my church, that were for children.


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RE: Family participation in education

Great... It does make a difference...Parents are the child's first and most important teachers. The more involvement with your children in learning will enable them to do better in school. Check this site: hhtp://WWW.NEA.ORG/HELPFROM/CONNECTING/TOOLS/MOTIVATE.HTML

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.nea.org/helpfrom/connecting/tools/motivate.html


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RE: Family participation in education

I am a volunteer and have done many outings and I am also the "Room Mom" for my 9 year old sons class and have done all of the parties. I agree that parents NEED to be involved in their childrens education in order for it to be a success, BUT, I also believe that the teachers should make the effort to contact parents and keep them up to date on their childs progress. Some parents aren't able to be as involved as they would like to be because of working full time or other personal matters, and they can indeed be as involved as possible with some help from the teachers. Next year both of my son's will be at the same school, and I was just accepted to the university that I have wanted to attend, so I will be in classes while they are in school all day, and I won't be able to be as involved. There are circumstances where the teachers need to do some reaching out as well. But it is most important for children to understand that their parents CARE about school and what their children are doing while they are there all day.


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RE: Family participation in education

Congratulations Deb!!!


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RE: Family participation in education

Thanks Anita!!!!!:) It's actually a HUGE DEAL, long story, but THANK YOU!!!! I'm SO HAPPY!!!


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RE: Family participation in education

That is great! I am so happy for you. I am helping my fiancee with an application for a graduate teaching program right now. I get the impression that the admissions people are really nice, from the conversations he has had with them and the application materials. He decided that this program was the only one worth applying for (and I agree with him, based on the alternatives), so I sure hope he gets in. I would love to hear your story.

I think it is important, what you said, "it is most important for children to understand that their parents CARE about school and what their children are doing while they are there all day." Because there are a ton of children whose parents can't help them with their schoolwork, but just knowing that they care can be enough. Look at (and it is probably largely a stereotype, but also based on fact) the children of immigrants who can barely speak english, but their children do well because it is comunicated to them that school is important - not because their parents are necessarily able to give them constructive help with their homework.

I just read the most incredible article, I wanted to link it but it is not available on the web, it is in Mother Jones magazine. It is about a 60's civil rights activist, Bob Moses, who has designed an innovative math program for junior high and high school. In the article he talks about the concept of "sharecropper education." The idea is that you can go to school and get an education, but it doesn't matter what you learn if you don't see people around you whose success is a result of education. So he has designed a program to help children who aren't exposed to educational success (and any other children whose teachers learn the program) get an understanding of advanced math, which is a solid way to get ahead because practically every person in the U.S. is pathetically clueless when it comes to math. I was amazed at the things that he said and the experiences he'd had registering black voters in Mississippi in the sixties. You should get the issue, I think any educator would be really excited about the program he has designed.


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RE: Family participation in education

Deb - you'll be more involved than you realize because you're setting a very good example for your children. You may not be in the classroom with them as much but believe me, they are watching you and taking it all in. You are definitely showing them that education is important no matter how old you are.


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RE: Family participation in education

Overall marriage has a positive effect on children. http://www.heritage.org/library/keyissues/charts/children_marriage.html

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.heritage.org/library/keyissues/charts/children_marriage.html


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RE: Family participation in education

Deb:

Congratulations on being accepted. I know you will do well because you CARE.

I agree with your statement, that it isn't really involvment with the SCHOOL that matters, but the fact that the kids know that their parents CARE about how they do in school and will provide whatever is necessary to ensure scholastic success. When my toddler is older I will be able to spend more time at school.

Mommabear


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RE: Family participation in education

I agree that the involvement with the CHILD is more important the involvement with the school. Seems like the same thing, but it's a fine line. I have been very involved with my son's school in the past. You name it, I've done, and then some. But there were times when I had so many committments to the school, PTA or community I lost sight of why I was even doing it. I felt like I was so busy doing things FOR my son that I didn't have time to do things WITH my son. I don't regret the involvement and I feel demonstrated to my son the importance of community involvement, of contributing and not just taking. All that sort of thing. But I don't think the message of "I care about YOUR learning" was as clear from the kind of activity. I think for that message, it comes across much better from my questions, checking homework, reading his textbooks when he brings them home, helping him select books for pleasure reading, talking to his teacher, etc.

I am not committed to the school at all right now. We moved to a new school mid-year and I am expecting baby #4 in a couple weeks. This is not the time to sign up for things. But I've learned from experience that when I do volunteer again, I have to maintain a better balance and say "no" more often. Doing so will make sure I am doing things WITH my kids not just FOR my kids.


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RE: Family participation in education

Tahnks so much guys! I know what it feels like not being able to say "no" when it comes to activities at the kids schools! I had said on my post that I did the class parties this year for my 9 year olds class, and though it was a wonderful experience for me, I ended up having conficts with other events at my 5 year olds pre-school!! BUT, I think that it was really my fault because I just couldn't say "I'm SORRY, but no I can't this time!" Anita, where can I get a copy of that article???? I KNOW my professor would appreciate it, I have never heard of the publication that you are referring to though. Talk to you all tomorrow!!


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RE: Family participation in education

It's called Mother Jones magazine. It's a very liberal magazine but it gets lots of non-political awards for investigative journalism - it is considered to be the top investigative journalism magazine out there. It is named after one of the major anti-child-labor activists in the early 20th century.

They should have it at any larger newsstand or you can order the issue online for the same price, no shipping charge:

Here is a link that might be useful: mother jones


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RE: Family participation in education

The following article should be helpful. It is very interesting and educational. http://www.cpn.org/sections/topics/youth/stories-studies/algebra_project.html

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.cpn.org/sections/topics/youth/stories-studies/algebra_project.html


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RE: Family participation in education

Yeah that's it! Thanks gardenboy.

Isn't it amazing? What an incredible program. When I think back to my math education, there were teachers who just absolutely killed it for me. The last competent math teacher I had was in sixth grade. From then on it seemed like they were trying to beat any fun out of the subject that they possibly could. And I actually love math. I hope this program grows until the whole country uses it.


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RE: Family participation in education

Here is an interesting article. http://www.chicagotribune.com/technology/chi-01102280275oct28.story

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.chicagotribune.com/technology/chi-0110280275oct28.story


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