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epoxy removal

Posted by beezbaby (My Page) on
Fri, Sep 9, 05 at 17:28

I used some epoxy on my stone fireplace to harden a hook to hang a wreath. Is there any way to remove the epoxy?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: epoxy removal

Heat from a heat gun will soften the epoxy on the stone.......


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RE: epoxy removal

Any suggestions on removing dried epoxy from fabric? (cotton)

thanks!


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epoxy removal-fabric

Any suggestions on removing dried epoxy from fabric? (cotton)

thanks!


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RE: epoxy removal

Sorry Jill77

the porous nature of cotton fabric allows any product to completely absorb and bond to the fabric.......


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RE: epoxy removal

We repaired a crack in our linoleum kitchen floor with epoxy and would like to know how to remove the extra epoxy from around the repaired crack
Thanks


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RE: epoxy removal

Foresight helps when using strong materials for crack repair. I use masking tape around the crack to prevent the epoxy from contacting the surrounding surface. Or use vaseline, keeping it out of any area where the epoxy needs to bond. The cured epoxy can be removed mechanically- can you say sharp knife? Do you have a neighbor who is a surgeon?


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RE: epoxy removal

Use carborator choke cleaner. We accidently discovered it in desperation. It worked on glass, stone, and metal, and "gently used it" on wood. My husband also used it to clean the top of my craft table. (fiberglass?)

Use a razor to scrape up the big blobs first, and use paper towels to wipe the cleaner off.


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RE: epoxy removal

My friend used Simple Green to remove epoxy paint from varnished wood cabinets. She placed it full strength on a damp rag and wiped it off. Worked great.


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RE: epoxy removal

I have removed epoxy with Acetone. However that was for small pieces that could be completely immersed in acetone and I think it took a few hours for the acetone to weaken the epoxy bond. I'm not sure if epoxy on a wall can somehow be soaked with acetone long enough to weaken the bond. Besides, acetone is a strong solvent and can dissolve all kinds of stuff (plastics etc) that you may not want to, so be careful!


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RE: epoxy removal

Ketones, such as Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) will soften most epoxy products... generally less aggressive to surrounding materials than acetone, but TEST to be sure.


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RE: epoxy removal

"My friend used Simple Green to remove epoxy paint from varnished wood cabinets."

Epoxy paint is only remotely related to epoxy adhesives.

The thin layers used in paints are far more easily attacked than the thicker films used in adhesives.

MEK will dissolve epoxy given time, and warming it helps.

Put some MEK in a glass jar, cover loosely (aluminum foil works well) and place the jar in a pan with some hot water.
Swirl the jar every few minutes for about 5 minutes, then use an acid brush (the little 1/2 inch wide type) to apply the MEK to the epoxy.

Be careful about finishes.
MEK can attack and soften a lot of finish materials, and damage many plastics.


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RE: epoxy removal

You should NEVER heat a solvent, especially something as volatile as MEK!!! And ESPECIALLY with a gas stove... But oh man is that a bad bad bad idea... I totally understand thinking it would help dissolve, but you'd probably be better off using a heat gun/hairdryer on the epoxy, then applying ROOM TEMP solvent. Personally, I would try to apply the solvent with a cloth or paper towel, then cover with plastic wrap or something to keep the solver in contact with the epoxy.


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RE: epoxy removal

MSDS for methyl ethyl ketone:

Here is a link that might be useful: MEK MSDS from Science Lab


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RE: epoxy removal

"You should NEVER heat a solvent, especially something as volatile as MEK!!! "

MEK is not especially bad, and has a very narrow flammable limit. (1.8 to 10%)

If you use an electric heating source or a double boiler setup with adequate ventilation you will not exceed 212 F.

Folks heat paraffin for candle making all the time, and it is plenty flammable in the liquid state.


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