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Can a rookie do this

Posted by BergiesGirl (My Page) on
Thu, May 16, 13 at 16:49

We just bought our first house and haven't even moved in, and the repairs are piling up. I don't even know what to call this, but the red brick part of the patio's high point is in the middle so the water flows both directions one being toward the house. I think years of that caused our more serious problem which is the cement looking part of the house has been eroded so water is getting on the slab.

Any suggestions would be appreciated, even if it's to call a professional because it's complicated

Thank You


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Can a rookie do this

It would help to have an actual pic of the problem area, can't figure out how to do multiple pics


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RE: Can a rookie do this

one more pic


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RE: Can a rookie do this

One way or the other, it needs to be sloping away from the foundation.


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RE: Can a rookie do this

Remove the patio and regrade the area, then redo the patio. It's backbreaking work, but it's definitely DIYable.


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RE: Can a rookie do this

So if we do that, does anything need yo be done with that portion that is already eroded?


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RE: Can a rookie do this

It's hard to tell until you excavate that area if you'll need to do any repair there. It depends on where the foundation level actually IS, and it's condition as revealed by digging everything out.

If you prefer not to spend all summer digging in the hot sun, a landscape company can probably handle the whole project inside a week. Especially if you can get a little Bobcat in there.


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RE: Can a rookie do this

From looking at the first picture - I see a potentially major problem. The ground should slope AWAY from your home - atleast 1/4" per foot. It looks like the yard is higher than the patio.

This means you will have to raise the patio starting at the house.

It looks like your yard should be regraded.
I think it's too big a project for a new DIY'er.


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RE: Can a rookie do this

Assuming you're not afraid of some hard work it is a quite straightforward DIY project, with lots of instructional materials readily available. What makes it a good beginner DIY project is that if you don't get it right the first time you just pick up the bricks and try again-- there's nothing that is irreversible in the process and no expensive materials are spoiled in the event of error.

It is hard, heavy work though. You'll need to pull up the bricks, re-grade or replace the substrate underneath to get the proper drainage, compact it, then re-set the brickwork. Not rocket science, but you will probably get a few blisters.


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