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Low slope roof and ice

Posted by fredsoldhouse (My Page) on
Sun, Feb 16, 14 at 13:48

My second floor dormers are low slope and are rubber. In the winter the snow load forms sheets of solid ice about 4" thick which slowly slide over the edge till they reach a breaking point and come crashing down about 25 feet into the driveway. This could easily kill you if you were under there and do serious damage to a vehicle.
My question: Would adding some of those roof spike things to keep the snow and ice in place be a good idea or would the snow and ice load add more problems?


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RE: Low slope roof and ice

The spikes are designed to break snow and ice into smaller and less dangerous pieces, not to keep it on the roof. There are so-called snow guards which act as low fences to keep ice and snow in place. In this situation - which sounds very dangerous - your best course would be to consult a roofing company about the best action to take. This really isn't a DIY job.


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