Return to the Remodeling Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Drywall repair

Posted by step2 (My Page) on
Wed, Oct 23, 13 at 10:35

I just replaced a bathtub, and in order to demo the old one and install the new one I had to cut the drywall 6" to 12" above the top of the tub. Is it best to replace this particular section in one piece or have a break at the corner? I've done minor drywall repairs before, but I've never messed with anything this big. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Drywall repair

You need vertical backing or split the next adjacent stud and seams over studs are the correct process.


 o
RE: Drywall repair

It will actually be easier to fix if you make the hole bigger. Any drywall needs backing at all seams for large pieces.

Cut out the drywall to the left(in the picture) to the center of the next stud.

Cut the repair piece to overlap the flange on the surround. I would use a factory edge as the overlap edge.


 o
RE: Drywall repair

But no, you don't need an L-shaped piece to properly fix it. 2 rectangular strips are fine as long as they end on studs, as advised above.


 o
RE: Drywall repair

This can be fixed without any drywall work by using PVC trim. First, cut out a bit more drywall at the side so you can slip a 2x4 stud behind the unsupported drywall. Butter the front and back edges of the stud with construction adhesive, put it in place and screw the drywall to it. Rip long shims from pressure treated lumber to build the shower flange up to the level of the drywall and nail them in place. Now you can trim the shower/tub side and top edges with 1x4 or 1x6 PVC trim, caulk it, paint it and - boom - you're done.


 o
RE: Drywall repair

Use these. I use them all the time. Great little invention.

Finish the seam with tape and hot mud, it dries stronger than the premixed stuff.

No need to remove any additional walboard. When you're cutting the narrow strips of drywall, take care to not break the core.

A little bead of liquid nails polyurethane construction adhesive around the flange of that shower stall will help hold the drywall to it. Don't use so much that it squirts out.

I would do this in about 2 hours total; drywall, taped, textured, and touch up paint.

Or you could buy a plastic trim kit and install that. Probably take the same time.

Here is a link that might be useful: instaback drywall repair


 o
RE: Drywall repair

I don't understand how the insta-back things are any easier than cutting to the next stud? Its neat, just don't think its that much of a time saver.


 o
RE: Drywall repair

I don't understand how the insta-back things are any easier than cutting to the next stud? Its neat, just don't think its that much of a time saver.


 o
RE: Drywall repair

Without knowing how close the next adjacent stud is, I would not use that system, because any drywall cannot have a greater than 3" free float, IE. unsupported, and with Aidan's recommendation, you'd have a potential 10" free float.
Also, when a shower door is installed, there would be the potential for vibration cracking.


 o
RE: Drywall repair

If you had doubled up that stud on the left, the issue would be non-existent. Now the shower is in place, I don't know how you'd attach another stud without taking out more drywall. But in reality, drywall is easy to remove. go ahead and open up the wall on the left to the next stud

You can put as many instaback plates as you need for support along the top. 2 between each stud is enough. 3 if you want to go crazy.

The patched piece is just as strong as a continuous sheet, as long as you mud and tape it correctly.

The correct way is to use hot mud. Force plenty into the seam, place the tape, skim over it to set the tape in the mud.

An hour later when the mud is dry, skim over it with another coat of hot mud.

I've used these things for over 10 years and never had a problem. It's really the best drywall patch system for small pieces.

Anyone who knows drywall, who tries these things, will be sold. Professional time costs money, and these save a bunch of time.


 o
RE: Drywall repair

Just wanted to thank everyone for all of the advice. Going to try to get this done tomorrow. Will let you know how it goes.

Thanks


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Remodeling Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here