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LOOKING for: Using Self-Rising instead of All Purpose?

Posted by suzieque (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 5, 07 at 14:53

Here I am asking another question of you who know much more than I!

If I have self-rising flour but not all purpose, can I substitute in a recipe? I'd like to make cookies (Snickerdoodles) and would rather not have to go out to the store if I don't have to.

Should I leave out the baking soda? There's no baking POWDER in the recipe, just baking soda.

Can I do it at all?

Thanks!

Suzieque


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: LOOKING for: Using Self-Rising instead of All Purpose?

I wouldn't.


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RE: LOOKING for: Using Self-Rising instead of All Purpose?

My recipe for snickerdoodles calls for baking powder plus cream of tartar....which pretty much equals baking powder.
Go for it....gas is expensive.....how bad can it be?
Linda C


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RE: LOOKING for: Using Self-Rising instead of All Purpose?

LoL! Well, I did try it. They were lousy, but satisfied the sweet toothes in the house.

Thanks all!


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RE LOOKING for: Using Self-Rising instead of All Purpose?

Ack! Did I say "toothes"???

Yup - I did.

Make that "teeth"!

LoL


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RE: LOOKING for: Using Self-Rising instead of All Purpose?

In my mother's MAYBERRY RFD cookbook, I noticed that several of the yeast-bread recipes called for self-rising flour. I was somewhat surprised. Were the bakers using a fail-safe technique in case the yeast was too old or new? Or maybe they just want to be known for their amazing, fluffy rolls.

chery2


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RE: LOOKING for: Using Self-Rising instead of All Purpose?

Plain flour and self raising flour are not interchangeable in most recipes. Plain flour has no leavening (rising), whereas self-raising does. Of course, if the SR flour is a bit old, you might find that the leavening has 'died off', and you might be able to get away with using it.

Mind you, I've used the wrong flour my mistake more than once. If you're making biscuits (cookies) which call for plain flour, and you use SR, they might rise more than you want and be softer in texture instead of crisp - but maybe you won't mind that!

SR flour is great for things like cakes, scones, muffins, pancakes. It is far more commonly used here in Australia than in America, so I've learned.


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