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Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Posted by marys1000 (My Page) on
Fri, Nov 14, 08 at 16:21

Its a little slow here so I figure what the heck, how bout some just general discussion topics?
I've gone from being a hard looker/want to buy to what I refer to as a Goldlilocks - I'm only going to buy if its "just right". I overheard a conversation at a work meeting today where the guy was relating a conversation with a realtor. I talked to him and he too is a Goldilocks though probably more committed to buying at some point (a young family guy) than I am (the more time passes the less sense it makes for me to buy).
I prefer to look at the MLS myself and so does he. We both look at the county websites and do some research of our own upfront. Drive by's etc.
I only ask to see something rarely, as I don't want to put anyone out unless I'm serious.
Its been over a year and I have had 2-3 sequential realtors slowly drift out of contact. I may have missed an opportunity or two because realtors either just can't wrap their heads around what I'm looking for and/or just lose faith.
Maybe they know its not out there and just don't want to tell me?
I do want that "yes I know it doesn't look like its perfect but I've seen it and I think you should take a look" input if a place warrants it.
Or.... just tell me my wish and price list is all wet its not going to happen and call me when I change it - something that hasn't happened although I'm beginning to feel that what I'm looking for just isn't a reality (why do I have to figure that out on my own?)
Do realtors just hate us Goldilocks? (I don't mean that in a personal way).
How can we browsers satisfy our browsing, taking our time needs and still work with an agent? Or should we just randomly call agents to see something in that occasional event? Or look with the sellers agent?

Goldilocks


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Time is money, even for RE agents.
You have 3 strikes against you. 1. It sounds like you are looking for the impossible dream. 2. You don't have a time frame, you might still be looking 10 years from now. 3. You don't seem to have a location, price, size or style criteria, making it very difficult for agents to help you find what you might be interested in.

Probably the best thing to do in your situation is to call the listing agent for info. or showings, at least they have a shot at making a sale, even if you are not the final buyer.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Berniek, any particular approach to take with listing agents? How does that work if I were to ultimately want to buy the house? Would I have to state up front initially that I would want my own buyers agent even if they show me the place the first time?
In my defense I do have a location, price, style etc., very specific though I do flex. And since I plan on retiring in 5-8 years and not here I'm running out of time - so I did or do have a time frame. Its those two facts that may make it the impossible dream - so only 1 strike!


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

IMO, if you call the listing agent and they show you the house, the sale is theirs. There isn't any bringing in your own Buying Agent after the fact.

If you call the listing agent and mention the fact that you will use your own BA, after the LA has shown you the house, the LA shouldn't show you the house. Your BA should.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"Your BA". That's just it, I wouldn't have one unless I decided to buy and went out looking for one t handle the transaction without conflicting interest.
Such is the life of a browser. No one wants to work with you.
Not saying I blame them but I don't see why I have to look at a bunch of houses and buy one that doesn't quite suit and in someone else's time frame or just walk away from the idea entirely either.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

marys1000, you are a looker/browser and not a buyer. When that changes, you should be able to find a home if your criteria is realistic.
A good buyers agent should be able to find the right home for you in a short period of time.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Had good buyers agents - no one has told me I was unrealistic when I told them what I wanted. But then the couldn't find it. Oh surprise! They act all confused. Why isn't it out there? Most realtors aren't' familiar with non-suburbia.
I'm not going to be a buyer until a find a house I want - not the other way around.
But its not all about me. I was hoping to facilitate a more general discussion but whatever.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"I may have missed an opportunity or two because realtors either just can't wrap their heads around what I'm looking for and/or just lose faith."

What specifically ARE you looking for?

If you don't know, they can't know.

Sounds like you are too vague and no one can please you....


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Sounds like a bunch of whining realtors on this site. I'm with the browser. Realtors are ridiculous and their model will disappear with the latest drop in housing prices....

For the amount they make on a transaction, they should be a little nicer to the browser. Sort of like walking into a touristy gift shop. The majority are browsers but they make so much on the few buyers that they put up with the browsers.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

David, you have no idea how this business works.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"Sort of like walking into a touristy gift shop."

david... you can't compare a house to a cheap 99 cent mug ....


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"Sounds like a bunch of whining realtors on this site. I'm with the browser. Realtors are ridiculous and their model will disappear with the latest drop in housing prices...."

Sounds to me like you are still driving a model "T".


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

I guess we can figure out who are realtors out there.

Lets face it though. With the internet, the buyers can really do their own searching and drive-by these days without wasting the BAs time, but they still need the agent to get a showing.

I think David's point maybe along the lines of charging a full 5-6% commission when I'm doing most of the leg work is pretty steep. And it pretty clear why flat fee listings came along and the drop in real estate activity will probably drive out lots of old school ways.

As far as the OP is concerned, it sounds like you're not very serious about buying, especially if you've gone through 3 agents already. Just attend open houses or call the listing agent if you find a house that might be right. You should be able to negotiate fairly well in these times, even with a listing agent.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Maybe being on your own, Marys100 suits you better-there are so many ways to search now, ways that only realtors could do like checknig the tax assessors website for purchase/sale information, zillow, google maps for checking out the neighborhood before doing a driveby.

Being on your own, the listing agent is able to earn double commision and you might have more negotiating room. A buyer's agent is never really the buyer's agent anyway, they ultimately want the house sold and work for the seller as their commision comes from the seller.

I am not a realtor, but the way the system is set up is the way it is...let's not be so snarky- most realtors are donig this job b/c the love to work with people and homes.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

A buyer's agent is never really the buyer's agent anyway, they ultimately want the house sold and work for the seller as their commision comes from the seller.

I hardly think a seller would agree with you.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"I guess we can figure out who are realtors out there. "

Really?? Who?


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Where I work (Massachusetts), a buyer is always entitled to a buyer's agent, even if the listing agent first showed the house. For a listing agent to represent both sides of the deal, known as "dual agency" both buyer and seller must agree to this. If one doesn't, the buyer may get a buyer's agent.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

I was Goldilocks!! I went to the major realty offices in my area, told them what I was looking for and told them to only call me with their own listings. This was 2002-2004 in Mass, so good houses would get offers quite quickly. Was looking in 2 adjacent towns with top rated schools.

The realtors complained a bit, but they all called me when they got new listings. Ended up buying in 2004 using only the listing agent and of course, my own lawyer. One of the agents that had shown me properties was the one who brought a buyer for my old house, which never had to be listed.

I would see the agents around town and I followed the market very closely. I was a good buyer, but waiting for that perfect house to come along.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

I don't get the model "T" remark. Having just sold 2 houses and bought some land, I am in the mode of disliking the current model of RE transactions. Having talked to many colleagues and friends about these encounters, I received unanimous agreement. Realtors can be nice people - most are. But the model is doomed to failure in a world with less $$$ being thrown around. Really - what percentage or realtors have just come around since 2000 - let's get those people back to productive work.

In my transactions, I worked with very competent and professional realtors. It is not a personal thing (though in the end who likes sales people of any kind?)

OP - call the listing agents after you have done your internet tour and driveby. I've done it when I was a goldilocks. But remember - every time you look at a house - you maybe inconveniencing a family so don't do it lightly.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

I would interview as many BAs as possible and be very upfront about my "Goldilocks" status. Let them know you plan on doing the leg work of finding the house on your own but will need them for the occasional house tour. Sounds like a sweet deal for a BA to me. No real work until negotiating time. The bottom line is that if you want to search for a house your way, some concessions will have to be made on your part as to the role of the BA.

If it really where me, I would not have a BA. I would just go to the listing agent and have an attorney help with the negotiating/contract.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

We used the same buyer's agent to purchase our first home and our second home. As first time buyers we needed a bit of hand holding and weren't entirely sure what we wanted. Our BA showed us several homes and spent a lot of "face time" with us. Our second time around we knew what we wanted, had two young kids, and had no time to waste seeing houses we weren't completely interested in. This time around as far as I'm concerned we were our BA's dream clients. All she had to do was put us on her automatic email list. We got new listings emailed to us, we followed the online real estate listings, and did our own drive bys when we wanted. When WE found the house we wanted, we called her and she set up the appointment to see the house and put together the paperwork for our offer that night. There's nothing WRONG with being a Goldilocks, I think, as long as you're up front about it. Get on a BA's email list so you get up to date listings. Do your own looking around and then call your BA when you need him or her. Though I think the good BAs will never tell you you're "wasting" their time, I think you can minimize the lookie-loo let's blindly walk into this house to see if I like it business by utilizing the internet sites first. Before we bought our current home our BA emailed us listings for THREE YEARS; in that time frame we called her about houses 2 or 3 times. She never thought we were wasting her time.

Good luck!


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"I don't get the model "T" remark."

Here are other RE business models you obviously have never heard about, hence the statement.

http://www.ired.com/news/2002/0207/trend.htm

http://www.narec.com/news39.html

http://www.alacarteres.com/


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

It sounds like the OP doesn't need an agent. The LA can show you the house and answer all the questions you have about it. They can even write an offer for you. If you understand the process and have bought/sold a house before a BA is not needed. I do agree the BAs have a COI, since they are compensated only when a transaction occurs. It is kind of like a stock broker recommending trades when they get paid based on the number of transactions they perform. I'm optimistic the RE model will change and become more efficient in the near future. I've noticed our county assessors webpage now has a link to easily look at comps for a given area (with a searchable database). The information now available to buyers is amazing.

I bought my last house with just the LA.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"I do agree the BAs have a COI, since they are compensated only when a transaction occurs."
Why exclude the listing agent? They don't get paid if the transaction does not close, neither does the title company, the lender etc.
Until buyers have the extra funds to pay their own agents, this system will not change.
It is in the sellers best interest to offer paying the buyers agent, because buyers need every penney to buy.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

We probably qualify as Goldilocks too but its because of the economy. Buying a house is a HUGE deal for most people and in this economy it means buying a depreciating asset. Therefore, any informed buyer will want to make sure they are getting the best deal possible and not paying more than the house is worth which is still hugely subjective in this economy.

I think we received our REs subtle message of dismissal since we are no longer on the e-mail listing thing. Does that cost the RE money? I can certainly understand why she would remove us if it cost her money


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

I would just go to the listing agent and have an attorney help with the negotiating/contract.

Interesting how things in other parts of the country are so different. In my area, an atty will not negotiate the contract between a buyer and seller. Even if the deal is already negotiated out and something changes after the home inspection for a "renegotiation". They throw it back in the realtors hands.

I think we received our REs subtle message of dismissal since we are no longer on the e-mail listing thing. Does that cost the RE money?

Jeri in my area, it does not cost the realtor anything to keep anyone on the email list. I'm curious, how do you know you've been removed or is it just that you arent receiving listings anymore? (could just be that nothing fits your criteria, which may mean the criteria is unrealistic)

The only time I've ever removed anyone from the email list is when I know from correspondence that I could not work with the person. One lady in particular comes to mind, I can elaborate if anyone is interested.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Hi Linda :-)

My husbands passion is watching the listings hes been doing it for *months*. I dont get involved in this side of things since I know he has it well covered. :-) Correct me if I am wrong but I think in addition to getting the e-mails, he can also log on to something??? He no longer has access to this (what ever it is) which is why he thinks our RE removed him.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Hi Jeri

Some sites require you to register/log in to get access. If your husband is no longer getting listings and cannot log in he probably was removed, however, it doesnt necessarily mean the agent did it. They are all on time periods, he could have just expired from the system. Just tell him to shoot the agent an email and tell her/him he is no longer receiving the emails, did something change in the system? It always makes me feel like people are more serious about looking when they do that. I'd much rather have someone ask to be put back on then leave someone on there for sometimes years never knowing if they are interested because they don't "opt" out.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Marys1000-

There is nothing wrong with "looking". Don't let the REAs bully you.
We looked for FOUR years before building. The agent showed us 4 houses in that time. The problem was that we were looking for specific things & were very picky. I did most of the research on the web & only called him if we thought a given house was doable.

Sure time is money. Honestly, I despise most REAs & their attitude. They want you to buy the first house you see. I actually think that to serve the public better, the RE profession needs an overhaul. There needs to be REAs who just open the doors for viewing & charge for that, so nobody gets bent out of shape. The RE industry is due for an Ala Carte set up. I have many, many family/relatives in the RE business, so I totally understand their perspective. The splitting of the commission 4 ways, their fees & all. It's not cheap to be in the business. They can't afford to give their services away. But you shouldn't be made out to feel like you must rush & buy the first thing you see, either.

There are many properties on the market all over US. However, IMO most are overpriced & 90% of properties are NOT desirable for a specific buyer. The sellers are trying to dump their properties on to the buyers. The good 10% are out there but you have to look carefully & take your time.

I would call an agent & explain what & how "I" want to search for properties. You may come across an understanding agent who will work with you at your pace.

Another thing, don't get too hung up on a BUYERS agent thing. Ultimately, the agents sell the seller down the river(esp. in a buyer's market) so they get a commission. This is what I see around here, anyway. I have many, many stories to back up my statement. Also, most agents are not good negotiators. They have no legal rights to protect you. They are not allowed to practice LAW. Around here, the REAs open doors & write up contracts, with lots of extra paperwork when a sale goes through a RE Agency. Selling/buyimg FSBO is simple. However, the RE industry took on a life of its own, charging sellers a ton of money. This in turn, became a deep pocket for lawsuits. All this protection that they supposedly give you is something that you are entitled too anyway. You can negotiate yourself & your lawyer can give you legal protection.

I always laugh when I see some posters cling on to their REA, like they have some special powers. Really, they don't. Some of them are really lazy & bad. They are just marketing people, who open doors & write contracts, with all this extra paperwork to keep the industry going...BUT, they have NO REAL or LEGAL POWER.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Wow dabunch, bitter much? I have never, ever, pushed anyone into anything. I have gone the extra 10 miles to accommodate my buyers including spending my own money. You are right about us not being licensed to practice law, but there are huge penalties, financial and legal, for not protecting our client's rights in a transaction. Without a buyer's agent contract, we are legally obligated to represent the seller. With the contract, we are legally obligated to the buyer. Also, a la carte services are available in many agencies.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"I have many, many family/relatives in the RE business, so I totally understand their perspective."

You really understand? Doesn't sound like it to me, you must be living in a bubble. A-la-carte and discount service companies have been around for many years, and the buyer always has a choice to pay a refundable retainer fee where I live.

http://www.narec.com/news39.html

http://www.ired.com/news/2002/0207/trend.htm

http://www.alacarteres.com/

http://www.progressivehomesellers.com/_How+It+Works.html

http://www.alacarterealestate.net/alacarte/

http://www.multiplelistingsystem.com/


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

A good friend is a realtor and not only is her time money, but her GAS is BIG money. The local custom is for the REA to drive buyers around, and even to buy them lunch! So there is certainly a disincentive to work with Goldilocks buyers. There are obviously new transaction systems developing (FISBO, listing agent only, etc) but if you want someone to help you BUY the house please actually intend to purchase one in a time frame that allows the REA to recoup his/her costs. Not every real buyer buys a house, but want you want is a tour guide. And yes my friend does let people drop off her email list after awhile.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Berniek,

I didn't say that REAs don't work hard. They do. It's because of the stupid "legality" within the RE industry.
I was shown a list of forms by a REA in addition to the regular contract. Unbelievable. She had a list of approx 100 EXTRA forms to cover her a$$.

When you sell a house FSBO, all you have is the contract, lead & a regular property disclosure. That's it. Sheesh, it's not Rocket Science....but put it into the hands of a realtor & it grows feet, legs, arms...

When you go with a RE Agency, the paperwork multiplies. The transaction takes on a *legal* life of its own. It's all not necessary. The public is paying for it. Nothing is for free. There is a very restless bunch of buyers & sellers out there who literally hate realtors because everything is manipulated & controlled by the RE industry. Stupid "buyers agreements"....etc. I can go on.

Sorry, but it is time for an overhaul. Maybe some people want the traditional REAs. Fine, they can use their services. However, most today are sophisticated enough to do most of the work themselves. They just need parts of the process that they cannot do themselves. Keep it simple. Keep all that extra realtor stuff out of the buying/selling process.

OP, doesn't need hand holding. She wants some help, when she wants it, at her own pace. THAT should be afforded to her without the typical realtor RE industry control. Some people don't buy in the first 30 days. They may not like what is on the market for YEARS. For that, they shouldn't be treated as though they are wasting the realtors precious time. There should be services for a client such as Mary.

I don't need those links to nothing. Thank you. The Ala Carte RE stuff needs to be better developed. Oh, it would help too if the realtors wouldn't boycott things other than the traditional RE stuff. The RE lobbying in Washington is very powerfull,too, just so that the public pays...


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Dabunch I don't know why agents bother to reply to you, its always the same old story. I think you get off on insulting real estate agents. You have been told many many times, if you don't want to use them, don't. It is your choice. No one is handcuffing you to an agent and forcing you to buy a house or sell a house with one. Get over yourself!

I don't know what state you live in, but in my state which by the way is the biggest liability state in the Nation, NY, realtors use three forms;

A property disclosure, an agency disclosure and a contract information sheet, thats it!

If you had an agent that showed you a 100 extra forms, it was to cover her A$$ against you. If I had a client that spoke the way you do about agents, you can bet I would be wanting to cover my A$$ too. YOU ARE A LIABILITY and most agents probably would choose not to work with you.

To get back to the original post from Mary. The majority of agents don't mind keeping someone on an email list and letting them drive by. When they get the feeling that you are not a buyer, you are a looker, you are wasting their time, they do drop you. Its a business. It doesnt take long in this business to figure out who the lookers are. Since she said she has had three agents drop her, its painfully obvious, she is not in tune with her local market and no one has been able to make her realize that.

The business has been slowly being overhauled over the last few years, with lots of choices for buyers AND sellers. Dabunch, you will be complaining too when you are the one that will be writing the check for the buyers agent. (UPFRONT IN SOME PLACES). Agents in my area are collecting checks before you even get shown a property. If you don't buy, they keep that deposit. (thats stops the time wasters in their tracks)

She wants some help, when she wants it, at her own pace. THAT should be afforded to her without the typical realtor RE industry control. Some people don't buy in the first 30 days. They may not like what is on the market for YEARS

She doesnt need the help of a realtor to wait for a house for 'years". She needs to do her research online, do drive bys, and wait for open houses.

There is no "control". Its natural for ANYONE, agents included to go where they are going to get paid, not waste their time on someone who isnt realistic about what they can get for their money and refuses to be educated on the market. Any realistic buyer doesnt take YEARS to find a house. YOU INCLUDED, you didnt find it, you built it. A good buyers agent would have figured that out in a matter of weeks.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

"I didn't say that REAs don't work hard. They do. It's because of the stupid "legality" within the RE industry.
I was shown a list of forms by a REA in addition to the regular contract. Unbelievable. She had a list of approx 100 EXTRA forms to cover her a$$."
Most do, some dont work hard.
Most states dont allow agents/companies to have their own contracts and forms to cya. Like our state, they have the states RE commission approved forms that are written not to the advantage of the broker, but for the protection of the consumer. Forms that are written by agents/companies to cya themselves, generally dont stand up in court due to consumer protection laws, at least where I am.

"There is a very restless bunch of buyers & sellers out there who literally hate realtors because everything is manipulated & controlled by the RE industry. Stupid "buyers agreements"....etc. I can go on."
If that were true, the majority of all the buyers and sellers would not be using an agent. But it seems that about 80% rather work with an agent in one capacity or another.

"Sorry, but it is time for an overhaul. Maybe some people want the traditional REAs. Fine, they can use their services. However, most today are sophisticated enough to do most of the work themselves. They just need parts of the process that they cannot do themselves. Keep it simple. Keep all that extra realtor stuff out of the buying/selling process."
One size does not fit all consumers. We used to have a one page purchase contract, but consumer protection laws have ballooned them up to 12 pages now. As I pointed out with my links, a number of different ways to buy and sell RE has existed for many many years. The reason why, the "traditional" way is still preferred by the consumer because of convenience, and until there is no way to make a living using that method, agents will continue to offer it. Even in my location, the traditional way of buying and selling RE is preferred, especially, since quite a few listing agents have reduced their listing side fees to levels where I could not stay in business.

"Oh, it would help too if the realtors wouldn't boycott things other than the traditional RE stuff."
Boycotting is against the code of ethics and usually against the buyers wishes. However, if the compensation offered is such, where the buyer might have to subsidize their agent, this business model will never work IMO.

Back to the OPs situation. If using an agent, and it is decided not to use them in the purchase, a non-refundable retainer or hourly fee is appropriate.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Ok, let me put things in perspective. My problem is more with the RE Industry, rather than the agents themselves. Although most agents become like the RE industry if they want to survive in that field. THAT is why a nice agent cannot afford to help "Goldielocks". The public needs to know the inside scoop & how deep this RE business is entrenched, and why the listing/selling fees are so high.

The RE industry is a PARASITIC industry, gauging the public. The RE industry became a huge business & the NAR et al want to keep it that way. Moms & pops, and the Ala Carte brokers, although well meaning, cannot survive in the RE atmosphere, where the FEES & DUES from NAR....AR....AR...Licensing and other, are killing them. As I said before-huge lobbying by the RE people in Washington. In fact, many agents currently have a problem paying their fees, but all the top parasites don't care. They keep coming up with more fees & more training on how to be crafty in the field & how to trap a buyer/seller-yuck.
Yes, I have a lot of insider information, so Linda117 & Berniek, you are preaching to the wrong person.

I think most agents go into the field because they like it & genuinely want to help people. That is why some try to service people by becoming discount brokers. Soon they find out that they "cannot fight City Hall" and all of its rules, regulations and the high fees.

I think the public CAN fight the NAR, by coming up with their own rules & lobbying. A regular buyer should have access to the MLS (I believe in some states they do), or come up with their own website & VIOLA- the RE industry can kiss their...All the buyers need a is a door opener.
I still think that majority of buyers today are sophisticated & can do most of the RE work themselves, especially the buyers in the states where lawyers are utilized, or buyers who have bought & sold before. Things are changing. Hopefully the public will speek up & bring down the RE business as it exists. No offense to the agents, who are trying to earn an honest living, and must pay the exorbitant RE fees.

In my 14-15 RE transactions, I utilized RE services twice, due to having to move quickly. I think at times RE services are necessary. However, to keep the buying/selling process by the RE industry under lock and key is dirty, and the public IS getting restless. It's time to dismantle the process as it is - 6% is a lot of money to pay for a selling service, yet it's not enough for the parasitic RE industry, because the top people enjoy their lifestyles, while the public is taking a beating & losing their homes.

While I sympathize with some honest agents who want to do good for the public, and are trapped in this vulture-like system, I despise the ones who joined the parasites, and are OK with what the RE industry is doing to the public. Those are the ones who come on this board and tell everyone, how they need a realtor, and how they are worth the 6 %. Puh-leeze. Be honest & share the disgusting part of the industry. You can provide a good service for a lot less, if you get rid of the unnecessary top parasites and fees. Yes, the RE industry needs an overhaul. The public needs more choices, not be forced into an expensive RE system. Sorry, but that's my 2 cents.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

I do want that "yes I know it doesn't look like its perfect but I've seen it and I think you should take a look" input if a place warrants it.

The impression I'm getting is that you don't *really* want to buy a home. I don't mean that accusatory, just that you don't sound enthusiastic. Your heart isn't along for the ride. Maybe that's what these agents are picking up on.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Sorry, but I don't have any time for Goldilocks.
The RE system is way too costly for me to really help buyers, who are non-committal.
Time is money. In fact, I overheard in the office how most agents are interested in homes with large commissions. One agent complained that the"little" listing wasn't worth the aggravation...

This isn't all the realtor's fault. We are placed between a rock and a hard place. The cost of being a realtor is astronomical. It is a big business. Because the public demands perfection, there are costs associated with lawsuits. Somebody has to pay-looks like it's the consumer. You people asked for it, you got it.

Personally, I think the RE system is broken. It is money driven. Nobody really cares. Do you think attorneys really want to help you? Get real. They want their money first. RE is no different.

Sales jobs are all about trapping and tricking the consumer. Sometimes the consumer gets lucky and does well. Other times, the purchase isn't what you thought.
RE agents are just people in the middle, showing places, and writing up contracts. Nobody, including attornies, knows everything about RE.

I think the commissions are too large for selling a house. However, the agent gets very little out of that commission. Ninety percent of agents do not make a lot. They may get to keep very little, after all the dues are paid, their adverstisement, the federal taxes. Yep, if the commission is 6% on 300k, an agent who is not in the top 10% of producers, may NET $1,500-$2,000. Surprise!
Trust me, the cost of doing RE business is very high.

Perhaps, streamlining and getting rid of the fat in the middle, can bring the cost to the consumer down. I don't see NAR allowing that to happen. What would they do if they could drive their BMWs?


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Boy am I thankful for my real estate agent. We are "goldilocks" and have been looking for about 3 years for the perfect house. Our real estate agent has been extremely helpful and has willingly shown us everything we have asked about. We finally found "the house" this week and have made an offer. Our real estate agent is listing our house and will make a nice commission on both sales. I am glad he didn't give up on us!!!


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Cricket - I'm very happy for you! Your persistance and willingness to stick to your dream paid off!
While the "industry" seems to cater only to those who need/want to buy within the next few months and have relatively simple and easy to understand needs (school system) there are others out there. I hope you spread your agent's name around liberally to help other buyers and sellers out.

One thing I've noticed from past threads and comments here is that some of the more negative views seem to overlook that many self-confessed browsers do a lot of their own leg work and really strive not to waste an agents time seeing anything and everthing but only serious contenders. I think we should get credit for that.

While thinking about that I rather suddenly looked at this from the other side.
Realtors have wasted plenty of my time by not listening to what I'm looking for and showing me things I'd no way be interested in, by being a cheerleader in the hopes I'll cave and buy something else and when not they drift away despite the fact that I do all my own leg work and ask to see very little and tell them up front what the deal is.
Maybe I shouldn't worry about wasting theirs? What's that comment about self-fulfilling prophecy?
There are a few houses I'm not really interested in. I have not asked to see them because I felt it was unethical. In the past I've even asked for appts in conjunction with other showings to save trips. I've emailed listing agents asking about future open houses and never received replies. But it would increase my knowledge of the very small niche I'm looking at so I think I'll just call the listing agent and ask to see them.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

Marys100-
I wasn't trying to be mean by telling you that I don't have time for Goldilocks.

I thought like you before I got into the business. The truth is that a lot of buyers waste our time. I don't have a problem working with someone 3 years, if they are up front about it and don't go looking at properties with someone else. If you would sign a buyers agreement with me for 3 years, I would gladly work with you per diem.

The problem lies in the fact that buyers don't want to sign an agreement for that long. They tend to be very cagey & lie. You have no idea how disrespected this profession is. Sometimes it makes me feel like a doormat.

I love parts of my job and I HATE other parts to the point that I'm thinking of restructuring my way of operation. I work for a large outfit and must abide by their rules for two looong years. I would like to make this profession work. I think there must be a better way. The RE industry as it exists today is very clicky.Most agents are protecting the system because they don't know any better, and are afraid of change.
I would welcome to work as an agent/broker for myself, like someone mentioned-like accountants. The fees have to go. It's a monpoly and people are paying for it. If I worked for myself with just the licensing fee and the MLS, I could afford to give people a big break on the RE charges. It would be a win, win situation. NAR & local Ars are very powerful. IMO,they want to make sure that the public doesn't figure out the monoplized system.

Before I got my licemse, I helped many family and friends buy and sell, for no compensation. This year, I decided that I may as well get paid for what I love.

The truth is that it's not all fun. Most of it is a lot of aggravation and hard work. Many agencies are getting sued nowadays, so as an agent, you have to cover yourself with a lot of extra paperwork. It's costing me over $4000 in fees this year (including the school, E & O insurance). That does not include my own advertising. That can cost thousands more. RE is not what people think. There are too many agents out there. In today's economy, the commissions are not coming. If you haven't been in the business for many years, your commissions are tiny. They are split many ways. The broker keeps a lot of it. The fees eat up most of it.

Most agents are not reliable and are not very bright. The funny thing is that the good "sales people" are not very bright, but they have a knack for getting clients by gabbing, I guess. They have the best sales pitches. Who doesn't like a dippy and gabby REA? You need a friend? Go work with a realtor. They'll be your friend forever-lol.
The intellectuals, the responsible ones with integrity spend too much time being informative and self-rightious, rather than procuring clients. Many agents are busy doing non-productive work, because people are abusing their time. Many are not responsible, no matter what they would do for a living. When an agent gets burned by many buyers, they tend to let the good ones fall through the cracks with the users. That is why you don't get a call back. Heck, I cannot get a hold of some agents in the office. Some don't return my call when I have a question while I'm writing up an offer on their listing!


Anyway, there you have it-confessions of a frustrated with the system realtor, who honestly loves helping people buy and sell. The money is secondary. However, I don't want to be used, either. Respect would really be nice, too.


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

dabunch reminds me of someone who used to post here all the time & then disappeared.

dabunch, did you once have a different screenname?


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RE: Realtors, how do you feel about Goldilocks?

notto - I know your not being mean. Interpersonal relationships are always the hardest and they are a part of any professional relationship.
As far as a 3 year committment - I suppose I would sign if I could have a short trial period first, i.e. see at least one house with someone to see how they described pricing to me, see if I could get a sense of whether they'd be a good negotiator, returned emails etc. before signing.


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