Return to the Buying and Selling Homes Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
do i have to hire "official" inspector

Posted by grandmum (My Page) on
Fri, May 24, 13 at 19:11

Is having a knowledgable family member conduct a pre-purchase inspection a bad idea?

He wouldnt be a licensed contractor, "inspector" or possess any sort of insurance of course.

Would I have any credibility if I had to negotiate repairs etc?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

Bad idea to use a family member...our state approved sales contract calls for a "qualified independent inspector" and in my area a family member would have no credibility even if they were a licensed inspector.
Your relative would also have no insurance and if somehow there was an accident and damage done there would be a BIG problem....Over the years I have had licensed and qualified inspectors accidentally cause damage and there insurance covers it.

This post was edited by LOTO on Fri, May 24, 13 at 20:04


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

The cost of hiring an inspector is such a small cost of buying a house I wouldn't quibble over it. And, with all due respect, I'm sure your relative is quite capable, but if he's not a professional, I wouldn't hire him in place of a professional. Aside from other issues, if he misses something, you will be mad and he will be embarrassed and it will cause all kinds of family unpleasantness.

That said, many people buying a house do multiple walk-throughs. Why don't you bring him along as a second set of eyes?


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

This will depend upon what your contract says. If I was a seller and received repair requests based upon a non-pro's opinion, I would be less likely to negotiate for repairs.


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

"our state approved sales contract calls for a "qualified independent inspector" and in my area a family member would have no credibility even if they were a licensed inspector. "

It starts of stupid "state approved sales contract"

And proceeds to even dumber "'qualified independent inspector.'"

That is nothing but a job protection law.

And exuding a family member who happened to otherwise meet the qualification is even worse.

What bureaucratic credentialed state do you live in?

Sounds like the home inspectors are looking out for themselves very nicely.
I bet the total damages they can be forced to pay is the amount of the inspection charge.


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

brickeye,
I live in Missouri if it really matters and I guess you don't feel that our state approved sales contract is worth very much....would writing it on a paper napkin at 7-11 make you happy?
You have a right to your opinion but your opinion isn't necessarily always right and I have no idea why you made the remark about the "bet" on the limit...just because real estate practices vary from state to state doesn't make them wrong and your thoughts right...kind of high and mighty attitude there and btw....there is no limit on our stupid "state approved" contract or the amount an inspector can be forced to pay so you lost that bet.

This post was edited by LOTO on Sat, May 25, 13 at 21:37


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

Anyhow, back to the question. Whether it is a good or bad idea depends on the person doing the inspection. What credentials or skills does the person have to inspect a house? What sort of report is he prepared to write?

Here's a better idea: hire someone who does inspections for a living AND also have the family member do an inspection.


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

I think it's a better idea if you hire a licensed, reputable home inspector and then asked your home-savvy relative to show up for the inspection. That's the best of both worlds.


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

"I live in Missouri if it really matters and I guess you don't feel that our state approved sales contract is worth very much....would writing it on a paper napkin at 7-11 make you happy? "

Why should the state be involved in dictating a standard contrast for the sale of RE at all?

Last time I looked the contract is between two independent parties , and no state has no real say in it beyond meddling.

Or do you enjoy the state telling you what to do in a private transaction?

'Big brotherism' at its best.

This post was edited by brickeyee on Sun, May 26, 13 at 16:00


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

I agree with Tony2Toes.

I have a cousin who is a contractor--he specializes in restoring old homes. Since I tend to like older homes, he comes along when I make a second visit to a house I'm interested in, and he comes along for the inspection.

While he is a very good carpenter and can tell me pretty quickly if things like a slanting floor are going to be trouble or not, he's not an expert on heating systems or electricity or plumbing, even though he knows something about them. However, he can interpret "inspector-speak" for me, if the inspector starts spouting all kinds of jargon.

And two sets of reasonably experienced eyes are better than one. My cousin has pointed out areas of potential concern to the inspector, and vice versa. (In one 1860-era house, the two of them had a grand old time tracing some long unused pipes to a capped off well in the basement. I had to remind them what they were there for, and tracing the mystery pipes for half an hour wasn't it.)

But I highly doubt a seller is going to give as much weight to "My father/brother/cousin says the roof needs to be replaced now," as they would to a licensed inspector saying the exact same thing. And that's why you need the professional inspector.


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

brickeyee,
I quick Google search on your username shows that we have a number of similar interests and I frequent some of the same forums.

 photo 17127590-dove-holding-an-olive-branch-isolated-on-a-white-background-as-a-symbol-of-peace-and-tranquility-and_zpsdaf13332.jpg

This post was edited by LOTO on Sun, May 26, 13 at 17:58


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

grandmum ... the seller doesn't have to let your "unofficial inspector" in the door.

However, if you want to take that person along when you look at houses, their opinion would be useful.

Brickeeyee: "Why should the state be involved in dictating a standard contrast for the sale of RE at all?" Well, if an officially approved inspector is just guaranteed employment for inspectors, a standard sales contract must be an evil plot to cut down on the jobs for real estate attorneys.


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

"a standard sales contract must be an evil plot to cut down on the jobs for real estate attorneys"

Very few times have I ever seen anything but the local board of realtors contract for a single family house.

It is STILL not a contract you are required to use, but it already covers almost all the typical items.

I have sen FSBO sellers violating copyright and using it.

My objection is to 'Big Brother' telling you that YOU must USE THEIR CONTRACT.

The few times a contract had to actually be written 'from scratch' guess what?

It comes out looking exactly like the local board's contract with a few paragraphs at the end (and likely a huge cost increase over the local board's contract).


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

Unless your relative has taken the classes or otherwise manage to acquire *all* the knowledge of *all* the systems, and unless (s)he has *all* the equipment (ladders, devices for measuring electric current, water pressure, & oven temperatures), & unless your relative has insurance in case of error or damage...
I'd go with the licensed inspector.

& then there's this:

"if he misses something, you will be mad and he will be embarrassed and it will cause all kinds of family unpleasantness."

I was selling real estate before inspections were common, maybe before they were even heard of, & I've heard about far fewer surprises since home inspections have become part of almost every transaction.

People used to be surprised when I recommended inspections so strongly, almost twisting some arms.

I even told a few buyers,
"You're right, it's your choice.
If you don't get an inspection, all you have to do is write a letter, & sign it, saying that Sylvia Texas told you to get an inspection & you wouldn't do it."

and usually the inspections didn't reveal anything that we didn't already know, but every now & then one did.


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

When DS#2 and wife were looking at houses they asked DH (who is very wise about building/heating/cooling, etc) to take a look at one they were thinking about making an offer on.
DH and I showed up with step stool, flashlights, etc. After DH looked around he told the kids to hire an inspector and he would pay for it.
The problem.
He spotted mold in the attic and didn't want to be the one to tell them. So we paid the $400 and let someone else tell them. The mold was all thru the attic and down the back wall into the basement.
So, yes, have your relative check it out but don't be afraid to have a "real" inspection.
Felt sorry for the seller after that. He was going to have to put a whole lot of $$$ into that place.


 o
RE: do i have to hire "official" inspector

"brickeye wrote: Sounds like the home inspectors are looking out for themselves very nicely.
I bet the total damages they can be forced to pay is the amount of the inspection charge. "
---------------------------------------------------------------------- --
Ive never seen it any other way, the preinspection contracts explain it quite nicely.

If a red flag arises they will pass the buck to a contractor that actually has experience in that field. And if the inspector drops the balls, all he is ever liable for is the inspection fee and nothing more.

You might be better off having a specialist contractor out to address any specific concerns rather than your generally trained ASHI guy to guide you around the house and point out basic maintenance issues to you.

I would suggest at least getting in the door with the inspector as your bargaining chip and most certainly have your family member along for the inspection to point things out. You can have as many inspections as you would like during your contingency period if something comes up beyond the scope of your family member or the inspector.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Buying and Selling Homes Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here