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Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Posted by wamot (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 24, 14 at 0:58

UPDATES: I called my agent, she called the showing agent. Showing agent called me and tried to apologize by lying.........

At first the agent told me they did not see the sign and her client did not wear high-heel. I told her I have evidence and you'd better be honest....then her story changed to she did not see my sign till the very end when they were leaving my house, and her client was wearing long pants so she is not sure if her client was in high-heel.........

Some people just keep lying even if they got caught......I told that agent I am upset but appreciate her calling to apologize. However, since there is damage on the hardwood floor, I will be contacting her if there is concern raised during the home inspection (by other buyers, we actually have two offers, but are keeping showing since the offers are contingency).

My agent is wise and advise me to go in a gentle way too. It is NOT about the act someone did not take shoes off, it is all about the DISRESPECT of those people.

They are young, they are in high-heel, they saw the sign and mocked about it, they have no excuse and no manner. I am not going to sell my house to someone like this anyway, it is just SAD that trying to please this kind of people in order to get an offer.

Thank you all for sharing your thoughts.

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We have new solid hardwood floor(Dark Stained Maple) installed before listing our house. We vacuum, steam mop and steam mop again before every showing, it takes about 1.5 to 2 hour to do the whole house.

We want to make sure the showing agents and their clients take their shoes off. We put a sign by the front door reads: Please take off shoes for your future new home. 9 out of 10 people will take their shoes off, and one who doesn't most likely missed the sign.

However, we had a very upsetting showing today. I came back home and noticed small dents on the hardwood floor. Then I checked my security surveillance camera recording inside of my home and found out: the showing agent and her clients(young couple) noticed my sign, kind of mocked about it, and none of them took their shoes off. One of them was wearing high-heel.

This is just maddening! I emailed my agent(she is great) : Please tell the showing agent, I will hold her client liable for the damages caused by her high-heel. I never thought our listing would attract those low caliber people. Also, I would like to call the showing agent's broker and let them know they will be getting a bill for the damage, or I will be seeing them in small claims court.

My agent told me she is going to call them tomorrow morning.

Any suggestion for me? Thanks.

This post was edited by wamot on Fri, Apr 25, 14 at 18:48


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I would not imagine you could take someone to court for wearing high heels in your home. Do you see her doing anything but "Normal walking" in the video?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

What kind of "hardwood" floors do you have if they're dented by high heels?

I definitely would not want a house if my wife or friends come in wearing heels and always have to remove them for fear of denting the floors.

Floors are meant to be walked on.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Solid maple......I think it is a basic curtsey to remove shoes, and especially for high-heel with steel caps, because it might cause dent.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

uh, oh, this isn't going to turn into one of those shoes on, shoes off postings is it? I have to agree with christopherh, if your floors get dented just by walking on them with shoes...you should have chosen a different "hardwood". But, if it will make you feel better, do let the offending agent know what happened so she will take off her shoes next time. If there is a next time. NancyLouise


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I grew up with hardwood floors and never heard it was proper etiquette to remove your high-heel shoes before walking on them. I must fit into the "low caliber" group that knows no better.

However, I have manners and if someone posted a sign to remove shoes before entering - no problem.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

B*ll Sh**. Don't expect people to take their shoes off while looking at houses. You have house on the market to sell, so there is a cost of doing business. Next time put good quality hardwood in your house.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I would contact the manufacturer/installer- she walked on your floor in heels. That's not a rare thing, and it's not at all out of line to expect your floors to withstand that.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

The main problem I see is this: you are trying to sell your house. If you make a huge deal out of this to your realtor and she makes it a big deal to buyers' agents, any potential buyer is getting one message. Namely, your floors are high maitenance and won't withstand any kind of serious traffic. As a buyer I would immediately cross your home off my list. It just sounds like a stress and hassle.

I understand how discouraging it must be to see signs of wear in your brand new floor that you are babying. Unfortunately it's just the way things go, and for most people that's just part of living in a house. It's fine if you want to leave the sign up, and you said most of your viewers are paying attention to it. I would strongly advise you to call your realtor back and tell her not to bother the other agent. The last thing you want is to have agents stop showing your home because they think you're going to try to hold them responsibile if their client scratches your floor. The other last thing you want is to give the impression to buyers that your home's flooring won't withstand regular activity.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Just an FYI for those who think the hardwood floor should withstand a person walking on them in heels- they should. However -most high heel shoes have steel balls or caps in the heel. This is not a problem until the shoe has become so worn that the metal is exposed. That metal then concentrates a great deal of pressure on the floor do to it being narrow and will dent a hardwood floor. The wearer of such a worn shoe is aware because the heel gives a tell-tale metal clicking sound when being worn. So I think the person who created the damage should be liable for repair.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Being from a part of the country where it's common to remove one's shoes when going into someone's house (and not considered rude to ask), I think it's dreadful that someone would flout your request.

That said, I doubt you have a legal basis on which to sue.

If it were me, and I couldn't just "live with it" I would probably take the opposite from your proposed heavy-handed approach. I'd have my agent call the other agent and say "my seller is distraught (not angry, sad/bummed out) over some dents that appeared in her floor, apparently caused by your buyers walking around in worn-through high heels." Try to get the buyer's agent to feel horrible about it rather than defensive.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I know of a house showing where someone track dog #### all over the house (mostly carpeting). The realtor showing the house had a lot of cleaning to do after that one. Yuck.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

What Acadiafun said. When the rubber end of the high heel wears out, the nail head pokes through. My HW floors were damaged by this when we had a party... just a few weeks after finishing a reno in which the oak floors were refinished. In several spots, the floor looks like a golf ball with tons of little divots. I was really unhappy about it for awhile, but then moved on.

A friend's brand new house had the same thing happen when her SIL walked through with bad heels.

You might consider getting something like Ram Board and laying it in the main walking paths on the wood floors.

As for contacting the realtor about the damage... I would take a much lighter approach than threatening to make them pay, but I would let the realtor know what happened just so they're aware of the issue. Kind of like someone walking on the carpeting with muddy shoes... shouldn't their realtor know that they caused some problems?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Lurker here but will be listing my home in the near future.

Hey Wamot...I would be po'd too, but let it go. It's not worth it. I have lots of red oak in my house. I don't mind shoes or dirt at all, have lots of scratches and consider most of the marks the Patina of Life. But, when people come in with spiked heels the shoes come off. Doesn't bother me a bit to ask them to remove them and even explain why. My guests are people I know well enough to not be offended.

Not a pic of my floor and I don't intend for it to be.

Here is a link that might be useful: Heel damage voids your warranty


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

A lot of people here are missing the point. It was incredibly disrespectful on the part of the realtor and her clients to ignore the sign and mock it. Whether they personally agree with the rule or not, the home still belongs to the seller and the seller's rules must be followed. Otherwise, don't look at the home!

In 90% of the world, you are expected to take off your shoes when entering a clean home. The U.S, the U.K, France and other parts of Western Europe are the only exceptions to this rule and they certainly don't represent a large part of the world.

In Canada, realtors, sellers and buyers all take their shoes off before entering a clean home. No signs needed - it's what we do.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I like the showings where they have little disposable booties to put on at the front door.
Many people fear taking off their shoes due to ugly toes or smelly feet.
At the same time I understand not wanting where I've walked to become part of your environment ...(Weather it be damage or not)
I don't want your environment becoming part of my bare feet.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Venting here is one thing. Venting to a buyer's realtor is quite another thing! You don't want to get the reputation as "that difficult seller".

BTW, steam mops are NOT approved for cleaning wood floors by ANY wood flooring manufacturer. Only the steam mop people will tell you it's OK, and they don't provide the warranty on the floor. It can cause the wood to swell, and degrade the finish on it. If you've cleaned the floors as much with the steam mop as you indicate, the dents could be a result of plain normal walking and the finish softening from the steam.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I completely understand your distress. I feel the same way about my cream colored carpet. Woe be to anyone -- guest or family member -- who even THINKS about walking on my carpet in shoes or dirty socks/feet. I can only imagine that you were screeching at the security camera when you saw that the buyer did the damage after breezing by your sign.

I think WeedyAcres has the best approach -- the buyer's realtor needs to be made aware of the situation by your agent so she can better manage her clients as opposed to having her clients threatened with a lawsuit for damages.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

No comments for the OP but you certainly have a very high maintenance home.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I recently sold a house with solid maple flooring, can't imagine getting angry at potential buyers for walking in shoes on my floor. I also can't imagine spending 1 1/2 - 2 hours prepping my flooring for every showing. What custom is in others places has no bearing on customary in the sellers area.

Bottom line, concentrate on selling your house, getting angry sends a big message your house is too much work to own.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I personally wouldn't look at a home that required me to remove my shoes. I wouldn't want to deal with a seller that was that fussy. I'd be afraid they'd make life miserable before we actually closed. Also, I'd wonder if the flooring was really cheep and that was why they didn't want people walking on it in shoes.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

spiked heels can dent hardwood floors--- the heels don't need to be worn through for them to damage the floor. i had newly refinished oak floors dented from a friends' newly purchased spikes when having a party... didn't occur to me to ask her to remove them because i never wear spikes and most of my friends don't either!! lesson learned!
i think it's right for your realtor to let the other realtor know what happened to your floors... but, i don't know if you can hold her responsible for refinishing your floors...


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Potential buyers should have taken off shoes. It is common curteousy! We take off our shoes whenever we enter someone's home. Having a sign to take off shoes would give me the impression that it is a clean and well cared for home. The seller has every right to be upset. High heels can dent floors. I agree that seller should let the other realtor know the floors are damaged, but in a gentle way.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I trust my shoes more than I trust somebody's floor. Never taken my shoes off, and never will.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

How annoying for you. We always take our shoes off when visiting and expect our visitors to do the same. When we sold our first house, viewers were asked to take their shoes off. We had very expensive off white carpets that we has kept spotlessly clean by take shoes off and wearing slippers.
When we went house hunting then we took our shoes off,
We are in the UK and everyone we know takes shoes off at the door. If people are uncomfortable going barefoot or in socks then take your slippers with you.When we visit this is what we do.
I would think that if you view a shoes off house that it shows buyers that the owners are respectful of their home and take good care off it.
Why do some people get so upset about simply removing shoes.Do some people actually shoes in the house? I realise that some may have conditions where they may have to wear shoes, but otherwise why would who has a lovely house not take thier shoes off?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

We had a potential buyer dig around our unfinished attic and make a foot imprint in our dining room ceiling. We had a few potential buyers through the home at the same time so we had no recourse.

You have every right to be upset. Under normal circumstances, I would NEVER ask anyone to remove their shoes before the came into my home. But in this case, it was beyond rude for the person to wear damaged heels into your house. It is the same thing as if she tromped around in muddy boots.

I do think your realtor should calmly mention the situation (including the security camera) to the other realtor. Nothing will come of it but hopefully the realtor will be more considerate in the future.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

We have a few houses around here that were built in the late 1700s to early 1800s. They have pine floors. The dents, nicks, scratches, etc are just part of the history of a home that had children living in them.

Sure, many times they were resurfaced and restained, but the marks are part of the charm of the home.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Spiked heels have been damaging good hardwood floors for decades. I have a housekeeping book published in the 1960s that suggests keeping a basket of slippers by the front door, for guests who are wearing heels.

Two points--heels hurt wood floors. And back in the 1960s, in the US, asking guests to remove their shoes was unusual enough for this author to make a point of this.

And I've seen posts from Canadians on other forums that prove that not all Canadians take their shoes off in their homes. It's regional, I think, just as it is in the US.

Personally, I like to wear shoes in my house. And lately, it's become a medical issue as well--without shoes, my plantar fascitiis could flare up and cause a lot of pain.

So when I'm looking at a house, a demand to remove my shoes is a sign to me that this may not be the house for me, if the flooring is so delicate that normal shoes can't be worn on it. The shoe covers don't send such a strong signal. They seem to indicate that the owners are trying to keep the house clean, rather than trying to protect delicate surfaces.

But after stepping in something nasty and sticky while touring a house barefoot because of a demand to remove my shoes, I'm never taking them off while house hunting again.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Like I said, I hoped this post didn't turn into a shoes on, shoes off post...too late. But to get back to the op situation. Requiring potential buyers to remove their shoes upon entering the home puts up a negative undertone to most buyers about the house (high maintenance, will have to rip out and replace with liveable floors/carpeting. The owners are going to be a PITA to deal with, etc.). The majority of potential buyers will not be thinking, "ohhh, these sellers take very good care of their house!" And there is the rub. You want to have as many buyers come into your home and have a positive experience. Don't start off on a negative note before they even get into your house. But if you absolutely have to have a no shoes policy, you provide booties for the people to wear. NancyLouise


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

What kind of "hardwood" floors do you have if they're dented by high heels?

Normal ones. A woman walking in stiletto heels has most of her weight on the TINY point of the heel during part of her stride.

http://www.rocksolidhardwoods.com/heels.htm "Measured in pounds per square inch (psi), a car has a load of 28-30 psi, an elephant 50-100 psi, and a 125-lb. woman with high heels, when she takes a step and those heels hit the floor, 2000 psi! That's a problem for any floor -metal, wood, ceramic, carpet, terrazzo, and resilient."

Compare that with the Janka hardness testing, which embeds a small steel thing into wood ... at PSI lower than 2,000 for most woods.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

(The majority of potential buyers will not be thinking, "ohhh, these sellers take very good care of their house!")

We all create opinions and make judgements based on our personal filters. To me, seeing the note like the OP's when house hunting would cause me to appreciate the home even more. My thoughts would be that they clearly take very good care of the house and that's exactly the kind of homeowner I'd want to buy from.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

The OP clearly set the rules for anyone who wished to view the home. The buyer clearly disregarded the OP's wishes. The new floor was damaged during a time where it may cause her monetary damage.
I would expect the buyer to compensate her.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

We saw similar signs when we were house hunting: "new carpet/floors, please remove shoes as a courtesy to the next owner" etc. accompanied by baskets of shoe covers. I thought it was a good way to highlight a selling feature.

wamot, sorry to hear about your floors and I do think your agent should say something to the showing agent, but threatening to sue might be biting off your nose to spite your face? Good luck with your sale.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Yes, that's a very nice opinion you have, but it is not the majority of potential buyers' opinion. When selling a house you want to appeal to as many buyers as possible. Don't put up barriers where none are needed. NancyLouise


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

"Potential buyers should have taken off shoes. It is common curteousy! We take off our shoes whenever we enter someone's home. "

What you do has nothing to do with what is common courtesty. Almost nobody takes their shoes off when seeing realestate.

I wouldn't expect potential buyers to, and I wouldn't want them to. Too much liability for them to step on something.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

"So when I'm looking at a house, a demand to remove my shoes is a sign to me that this may not be the house for me, if the flooring is so delicate that normal shoes can't be worn on it. "......

No, the shoes were not normal shoes, per Lazygarden's posting, they were a pair that could put 2000 psi on any floor.

Would you allow someone to wear shoes made of steel bottom spikes? Are they normal shoes?

Of course people take off their shoes when viewing a house especially when they are being asked. It is being respectful and considerate. No one has right to trash others' properties.

Personally I appreciate home sellers pay close attention to the care of their homes.

Here is a link that might be useful: shoes made of steel bottom spikes


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

"but it is not the majority of potential buyers' opinion."

Based on the responses here, NancyLouise, it's not a majority opinion.

"It is being respectful and considerate. No one has right to trash others' properties."

Exactly.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Threatening to sue????? Word of this will get around to all the Realtors in the area very fast ----- good luck selling your house when the local Realtors won't show it.

I wouldn't want such a high-maintenance floor. Floors are to be walked on.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

To those implying that heels will damage hardwood regardless. I am that 125 pound woman putting 2000 lb psi on a floor in my spike heels. I do not wear heels around my house on a daily basis, but it is not uncommon for me to wear them around before I go out. We have red oak on our main floor and I have never noticed any dents or scratches from my shoes.

We never require people to remove their shoes when visiting (or now viewing, as we are selling our home) though many people do it voluntarily. We have never found any damage from someone's shoes.

As a potential buyer I would not want to buy a home in which I could not wear my regular shoes without ruining the floor. It sounds stressful.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Here's the thing - the OP has a sign requesting that people take their shoes off. It doesn't matter if the potential buyer and/or the real estate agent agrees with that request or not...they are going into another person's home and they should abide by the wishes of the current owner. It's as simple as that.

High heels can, AND DO, scratch and dent hardwood (ANY hardwood) if they have not been properly maintained - the taps wear on the shoes exposing a nail and that nail head is often rough and is quite small, so you have an even smaller "strike point" than typical from a high heel. Well maintained shoes with heel taps that are in good repair will not typically cause issue with a wood floor.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Slimy Okra said:
"In 90% of the world, you are expected to take off your shoes when entering a clean home. The U.S, the U.K, France and other parts of Western Europe are the only exceptions to this rule and they certainly don't represent a large part of the world."

I don't think your math is right. I think you can remove Central and South America from your list. Never saw anyone remove their shoes in that part of the world. No such expectations in Greece either.

Have lived or spent time in several states from Florida all the way up to Maine ... no such expectations either. I'm in CA now and no such expectations either.

Many kids will take shoes off on their own, but adults are not expected to, but it goes without saying that people do remove winter shoes if they are muddy/wet.

Most of the damage on my site finished oak floors have nothing to do with shoes, but are due to dropping heavy items like food cans or the kids/husband dragging chairs as they get up.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Agree with this>>>"As a potential buyer I would not want to buy a home in which I could not wear my regular shoes without ruining the floor. It sounds stressful."

Just curious, as potential buyers, wouldn't folks also prefer to buy a home with a brand new floor? If you go to the car dealership would you prefer to purchase the car that's been test driven 100 times or one that is fresh off the truck? If you go to the store to buy a new sweater, would you buy the one on top not folded neatly that it looks like someone's tried on before, or would you grab one lower in the stack?

I realize that houses are unique, but I think that "new" is an effective selling point -- perhaps different messages are being conveyed depending on how the "shoes off or covered" request is made.

This post was edited by Oaktown on Fri, Apr 25, 14 at 12:43


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

"Just curious, as potential buyers, wouldn't folks also prefer to buy a home with a brand new floor? "

Not necessarily.

I like older houses over new houses for several reasons. The workmanship, the plaster walls, the overall style. But living in a "used" house means that there will be gouges in the wood floors, cracks in the ceilings, dents here and there. The wainscotting may be chipped, the varnish on the trim scratched, the brass dulled by time. Doors might creak, drawers might stick, hardware might be damaged or missing.

Any damage I might inflict is going to blend right in. In a brand-new house, I'd have to worry about when the first ding, crack or dent would be made.

I like the patina that 100 years or so puts on a house. I realize that others might not.

But in the OP's case, with a clearly brand-new floor, the dents could stand out in a buyer's mind, and not in a good way. Brand-new things ought to look brand-new. Much though I don't like being asked to remove my shoes, I do think the OP has a right to complain about the damage.

If a buyer goes through the house, accompanied by a small child, and the child drew on the freshly painted walls, wouldn't the homeowner have some recourse to have the damage repaired?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

If they didn't want to abide by the request to remove shoes, then they shouldn't have viewed the house. Period.

Yes, the seller may be reducing the buyer pool by her restrictions (seems common enough around here to take off shoes, but who am I to judge), but she has the right to put those restrictions in place - it's still her house. She could also have restricted all showings to Mondays between noon and 2:00pm - that's also restrictive, but well within her rights.

Buyers don't want sellers present during showings because it makes them uncomfortable, but in order to have that freedom, they need to be mature and not disregard requests like this.

I'd be livid - especially because they have video evidence of their disregard.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

You said in your original post that your agent was already planning on calling the buyers agent on Thursday morning. So what happened when your agent called?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I just put in engineered wood floors and it says on the instructions not to wear high heels on it. When we put our house on the market, you bet I will ask people to remove their high heels. I would be livid too.

I don't have any advice for the damage done to the OP's floors. I did want to say that perhaps there should be something in the description about the no heels policy when entering the house so realtors and their clients can choose different footwear before making the appointment. Or maybe a reminder when they make the appointment?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

UPDATES: I called my agent, she called the showing agent. Showing agent called me and tried to apologize by lying.........

At first the agent told me they did not see the sign and her client did not wear high-heel. I told her I have evidence and you'd better be honest....then her story changed to she did not see my sign till the very end when they were leaving my house, and her client was wearing long pants so she is not sure if her client was in high-heel.........

Some people just keep lying even if they got caught......I told that agent I am upset but appreciate her calling to apologize. However, since there is damage on the hardwood floor, I will be contacting her if there is concern raised during the home inspection (by other buyers, we actually have two offers, but are keeping showing since the offers are contingency).

My agent is wise and advise me to go in a gentle way too. It is NOT about the act someone did not take shoes off, it is all about the DISRESPECT of those people.

They are young, they are in high-heel, they saw the sign and mocked about it, they have no excuse and no manner. I am not going to sell my house to someone like this anyway, it is just SAD that trying to please this kind of people in order to get an offer.

Thank you all for sharing your thoughts.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Just another poster who would appreciate a home where the owners cared enough about the condition of the floors to require shoe removal/booties. I would TOTALLY see that as a positive...they may be picky, but of course that is a benefit when you are buying real estate! It would send the message of "well-maintained home" to me.

I would lay off the steam mop so much, though...I don't think wood floors like that much water.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Previous Poster wrote:
"Here's the thing - the OP has a sign requesting that people take their shoes off. It doesn't matter if the potential buyer and/or the real estate agent agrees with that request or not...they are going into another person's home and they should abide by the wishes of the current owner. It's as simple as that."
THIS is the correct response, as it makes no difference if others like or do not like to take their shoes off for a showing.
I know for a fact that water based poly urethane can take a long time to fully cure to its complete hardness.
Good to hear that you have a couple of offers.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Thank you for the update, wamot! It's always great when the OP comes back to tell us how things ended up. It sounds like those buyers and the agent deserve each other.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

wamot, congratulations on the offers; hope your house sells soon.

camlan, you make a good point but it didn't sound to me that this house is going for the "patina of age" look ;-). I like character floors too!


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I would not deal with a seller who is such a pain with people not walking barefooted. Do you tell people to take their shoes off when you invite them and they come well dressed? Pathetic


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I certainly agree that if the buyer did not want to abide by the request to remove her shoes, she should have just left.

The amount of steaming of a new hardwood floor that is apparently going on (based on the OP's description) is very likely bad for the finish and the wood itself, and could well be a contributing factor to any dents. A surface raised by steaming would certainly show dents more easily.

I find the surveillance video thing creepy.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

kabir,

I feel sorry that you had such strong emotion after reading my post, but I think no one will force you to see and buy any house.

I see people do belong to different classes, and you just have no manner and certainly will not be welcomed by most of the commentators here.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Someone walks in your "for sale" house with their shoes and you make such a huge cry about it, shows the class very well. I own 30 plus houses which are high end by few standards, and put hardwood flooring in them the day I buy. I know wood does not get damaged by heels. Even if it does, have some class to take it in stride!!!


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

So insisting on visitors taking off their shoes is a CLASS thing???

Ummm, no.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

We are in the UK and we don't know anyone who wear shoes in the house. People keep saying that people here don't take theirs shoes off. That's nonsense


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Kabir,
If I were taking you around showing homes, and you refused the once - in - a - while request to remove shoes, and you refused, I would think you were a very strange cat indeed.
30 High end homes... yeah, right.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Let's cut to the chase here.

This isn't about what's normal about removing shoes or not. There was a written request that people please remove their shoes when entering.

If I'm in the market and I see that sign, I oblige. THAT's common courtesy. The OP has proof they saw the sign and disregarded it. They should have removed their shoes or turned around and left.

I've looked at homes with new carpeting and they put runners on the floor so the carpet stayed clean.

It was definitely wrong for the realtor to ignore the request of the homeowners, because they're the ones paying her commission.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

"To me, seeing the note like the OP's when house hunting would cause me to appreciate the home even more. My thoughts would be that they clearly take very good care of the house and that's exactly the kind of homeowner I'd want to buy from."

That's exactly how I feel.

To the OP, you put everyone on notice about not wearing shoes. If you can prove who damaged the floor you would have a solid case for a lawsuit because again, they were put on notice, ignored it, and then damaged your property.

The idea not to sue over this is preposterous. Your home was damaged out of pure negligence. It's not you being difficult, it's the person who showed your home. THEY should get the reputation for being irresponsible, negligent and reckless, by ignoring the notice. Once someone is on notice, that's it.

This is not a shoe on or shoe off situation, or about how anyone else feels about shoes in the home. It's a legal situation of an agent put on notice, and refusing to comply and the resulting damages.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I personally do remove my shoes when I am asked to.

How many dents are in your floor? If it's indeed very noticeable, buyers may not bring it up during inspection, but may nevertheless take it into account in their offer.

On the other hand, I wouldn't bring "class" into this discussion, and wouldn't waste my time trying to "educate" other people, even if they behave the way you see fit. Also, would you really "not going to sell my house to someone like this anyway" if the price is right?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Also, are you in a state where you are allowed to videotape and audiotape someone without their knowledge and consent?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Oh, for heaven's sake.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

"Also are you in a state where you are allowed to video/audio tape without consent"

Seriously? It is HIS HOME! If someone comes onto your property, you don't need their permission to have them on tape. It isn't a public area.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Six years ago when we were looking at homes with an agent, we did come across one house that had a note that said, quite politely, "Please remove your shoes when viewing our home." I told the agent I would just prefer to leave because I don't remove my shoes, but SHE insisted since we had come a bit out of our way that it was okay NOT to....

Wouldn't you know...it was the house we bought.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

While it may be the norm in some areas to remove shoes upon entering a house, there are people for whom this may be difficult. There are people who are told to wear shoes all the time--people with foot, knee or back issues, people with diabetes. Diabetics need to wear shoes to prevent injuring their feet, which is more likely in unfamiliar surroundings such as a house they have never been in before. Some people have physical issues that make taking off and putting on shoes difficult unless there is a chair for them to sit on.

Unless the market in a given area is really hot, I think it would be wise for a seller to provide alternative means of protecting the floors--runners over the major walkways, shoe covers, etc.-- rather than rely on having buyers who are willing and able to take off their shoes.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Shoes are an integral part of a person's dress, whether its a man or a woman. Most people do not step out of a trench before coming to look at a house. The soles of a shoe are pretty clean. A nice door mat also helps the cause than being such a pain in$%$%$%..


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Given the most recent posts, I think this post from above bears repeating:

Here's the thing - the OP has a sign requesting that people take their shoes off. It doesn't matter if the potential buyer and/or the real estate agent agrees with that request or not...they are going into another person's home and they should abide by the wishes of the current owner. It's as simple as that.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

For pity's sake, we get your take on wearing shoes already, Kabir. What Is harder to fathom is the hostile and shaming tone. If you don't want to take off your shoes, don't. What's "pathetic" is to keep harping on and on about it with no practical advice or insight relevant to the discussion.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I always assume I will need to remove my shoes when entering anyones home (for sale or not) and plan accordingly.

"The soles of a shoes are pretty clean"???? I have stepped in dog do-do more times than I can count. We have had people with what must be tiny stones stuck in their soles and scratched our hardwood. Also we have an asphalt driveway. No matter how well we take care of it, tiny pieces of asphalt will track into the house and make nasty marks.

I do not insist that people remove their shoes when visiting our home but most do anyway.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Re: recording. It's illegal in some states to make an audio recording of someone without their consent, whether or not they're in your home.

However it tends to be legal to have surveillance cameras in your home without notification or consent as long as they're not in the bathroom, changing room, that type of thing.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I once had somebody track black tar onto my new carpet. I am sure they had no idea it was on their shoes but it was.

But I really don't think there is much to debate on removing shoes or not when entering someone's home where a sign is posted requesting it. If a buyer is turned off by it then they can leave.

Also the surveillance camera is a great idea. In the last two months in my old neighborhood, vacant houses for sale were broken into and the houses stripped of copper pipes.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

""Also are you in a state where you are allowed to video/audio tape without consent"

Seriously? It is HIS HOME! If someone comes onto your property, you don't need their permission to have them on tape. It isn't a public area."

Not quite true. Yes, you can have surveillance cameras in your home, but there are 13 states in the country where you are not allowed to audiotape other people without their prior consent, regardless of where the taping takes place.

Also, it's not like these people were entering the house unauthorized. Think about it. If you visited someone in their house. Would you be happy if you found out afterwards that your hosts were tape-recorded you without your knowing? If you are buying a house and are looking at it, do you expect that your conversations are being recorded?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Gee, this has turned out to be a contentious thread!

I'd be upset too, if my floors were damaged during a showing, and enraged by visitors who scorned my wishes. But I'd say this was at least partially your fault for softening the wood by steaming it. What were you thinking? OF COURSE steam will weaken hardwood.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Most wood floors steamed or not will be damaged by spike heels.

I used to wear spike heels all the time when I was younger. I did a lot of damage to floors because I did not get the heel tips repaired. Also, my friends damaged mine.

Once I was going down carpeted stairs at work. My heel caught in the carpet, pulled the fibers, I was holding the railing, as I fell, I pulled the entire railing out of the wall. I only weighed about 120 lb. Carpet and drywall damage. I was young and knew I had really caused it but the men in the office had no clue.

If you wear spikes get them repaired!

And put a sign at the door, premises under video surveillance.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

All of the people above who noted that they always take their shoes off when visiting...How do I let you (my guest) know I do NOT want you to do that in my house??????? Ewwwwww.....


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Many guests take a cue from their hosts. I usually walk around on socks at home, so many guests assume that they also should take their shoes off. Either I tell them not to take their shoes of, or I put on shoes before guests arrive. If I'm caught unawares, I will put my shoes on in front of them.
On the other hand, I don't really care. Whatever makes my guests happy.
The only issue I once had was snowy weather outside with half the guests taking their shoes off, the other half not, and not quickly wiping up any melted snow. So the ones on socks got wet feet :(


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

As a contractor, my crew and I are wearing work boots in your home as long as we are working there. This is not negotiable. We will put on covers, but if there's a lot of in-and-out, expect a bill for the time you added to the job if you didn't mention this requirement beforehand.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I would never hire a contractor who expected to bill me extra for protecting my floors while working in my home.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

So wamot - can we get an update. You said you had 2 offers and were waiting for inspection reports. Did the inspection come out ok? Are you suing the showing agent?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

high heels with steel taps do dent oak floors, even 70 year old oak.

I feel for you.

In my first home, a friend came over in her slut stilettos and the house was covered in dents from these.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

redcurls....I assume you are you have greeted your guests at the door. If they start to bend down to remove shoes, immediately let them know they can keep them on.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Jewel654:

I'm not going to do things that take more time/money and not get paid. When I bid a job, I assume I can use the homeowner's electricity and water. If that's not cool, I can generate or bring my own, but that's gonna cost the homeowner extra. I assume I can walk on the floors without damage. If a homeowner wants floor protection, I'll put it in my bid.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Jewel654:

I'm not going to do things that take more time/money and not get paid. When I bid a job, I assume I can use the homeowner's electricity and water. If that's not cool, I can generate or bring my own, but that's gonna cost the homeowner extra. I assume I can walk on the floors without damage. If a homeowner wants floor protection, I'll put it in my bid.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

I am surprised so many people do not know that stiletto type heels can damage floors. Not just wood but can also crack other types. It creates too much pressure. Generally when you purchase flooring, it is mentioned in the warranty clause.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

How much more do you add to your bid, Trebruchet, to put down drop cloths or plastic runners?


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Jewel - we paid for the rosen paper and hardboard that our contractor put down to protect our floors. We did it gladly. As for Trebruchet, he said before that they would put on covers (I'm assuming the disposable bootie covers that you can get), but if going in and out a lot, there would be time added. The people working on your home are selling a service...service is largely time based...and since there are only so many hours that a person can bill for, they need to recoup their money. I work in an industry where I wind up having to charge for my time - sometimes I have to travel to multiple locations...my clients pay me from the time I start until I finish, if it takes me 15 minutes to get to one location or an hour...they still pay me for that time.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

It would be a mistake, in my opinion, to tell a client that they'll pay extra to protect their floors from worker's shoes.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Most people wear shoes which do not damage floors. There is something called cost of living and doing business! Are you planning to take your wooden flooring with you to the grave!!


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

In my area, contractors, subs, everyone who works in my house...puts on booties. I totally get that workers need protection on their feet, but come on...do you really think you should track muddy boots through someone's clean home?? Wear covers! I would TOTALLY drop a contractor who charged me more for putting on covers. And I would demand correction if a contractor damaged my floors, stained my rugs, etc.


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RE: Hardwood Floor Damaged During Showing..It is Just Maddening

Any contractors we have had always brought large drop cloths and spread them over the areas where they would be going in and out of the house. No extra charge.


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