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IPE Deck

Posted by howard_PA (My Page) on
Thu, Aug 11, 05 at 11:09

Greetings,

Our beautiful IPE deck was built last fall, and it is now late summer, and time to put a stain on it. I want to recover the original color and protect it. THe wood has turned somewhat grey and is 'fuzzy' over most of the surface, along with some fine cracks. I've been reading the forums, and have a question for the experts about preparation and product. My builder recommended using Sikkens. Calls to Sikkens led me to the Cetol SRD product. Sikkens recommends sanding with 60 grit, wipe with acetone, then 1 coat of SRD. I have not seen this mentioned on the forums, so I am curious if anyone has experience with that approach?

I have contacted Cabot and MFG and gotten samples of products I read about on the forum - Aussie Wood Oil and Total Wood Protector. Both companies, and most of the postings here recommend brushing, washing with TSP and or bleach solution, rinse, let dry, then stain. Question: Will that resolve the fuzzy, splintery feel? My instinct is that it will not, and that I will be happier sanding, then finishing. So, the next question, is, can I use the Sikkens prep (sand, acetone), then apply the AWO or TWP? These prodcts are more expensive than the Cetol SRD, but get such rave reviews I am inspired to try them out.

Note that the deck is 'new' and has never been stained or coated. So I don't think I need to use a brightener or whatever.

Thank you very much in advance for your help.

Cheers,

Howard


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: IPE Deck

Please pardon my intrusion on your post, but because you describe that your ipe deck is "fuzzy and splintering," I am wondering if someone who responds to your post would address whether this is a normal, expected trait of untreated (or treated) ipe?

I had all but decided on ipe because my impression was that it would be resistant to splinters (as well as rot and insects--I would let it go gray and want something as long-lasting and maintenance-free as possible). However, a prospective builder is trying to steer me away from ipe due to the splintering in particular, as well as the cost (saying he'd recommend cedar, at near the same price as PT, which we have now--and I had previously ruled out cedar! So I am confused now.).


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RE: IPE Deck

Thanks for the note - just to clarify, I am talking about very fine splinters. My builder said it was optional to stain or coat it, but my wife and I love the color and grain of the IPE and want to maintain that look. He never said anything about fuzz.


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RE: IPE Deck

We call it wiskers,ipe gets a little of that if left with no finish at all,sanding is the best way to deal with it.I dont use any prep wash at all with projects like yours sanding is all I need. I use TWP products and I got no reason to change. John


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RE: IPE Deck

John - thanks for that note about the 'wiskers'. I feel better knowing it's not just us, and that we didn't wait too long to apply finish. Do you wipe with acetone, or just put the TWP right on after sanding and brushing/vacuuming the dust?


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RE: IPE Deck

Thank you, John. Fuzz and whiskers, huh? Now I'm wondering if I should just stick with PT or cedar, if I need to apply a sealer no matter what I choose. I was hoping to avoid that kind of maintenance by just letting the ipe weather naturally.


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RE: IPE Deck

Blue,

While I do not claim to have anywhere near John H's experience with IPE, I looked at several types of decks before deciding on IPE, including several 5 year old IPE decks and similarly aged Cedar and Composite Decks.

The Cedar cracks and spinters in a big way. The IPE Decks I looked at all looked great. No cracking or splintering. One of these IPE decks had never been treated with anything. It was made with the 1X4 material.

IPE does not splinter or crack in the same way that cedar does. With cedar, it's a whole different thing.


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RE: IPE Deck

Thank you, Johnplace. I got conflicting info from the deck builder, as noted in my earlier reply, so it's nice to hear a different point of view. I still haven't decided because I'm awaiting some more estimates.

I feel bad for hijacking Howard-PA's post!


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RE: IPE Deck

Everyone that I have spoken to (both professional and non-professional) agrees that IPE keeps its beauty much longer than cedar or PT, even if you don't finish the IPE. IPE may develop these fine splinters, narrow checks, and maybe even the rare crack, but it is nothing like the cracking, warping, twisting, splitting, and splintering that you get with PT and the cracking, scratching and splintering that comes with cedar.

I have not encountered one single person who would disagree with this, unless your contractor is the first. THe fact is, a lot of guys just don't want to work with IPE because it requires more effort, which gets back to some sage advice that I have seen posted here before by several users -- If you're building an IPE deck, get a guy with lots of IPE experience. Don't let the learning curve be on your deck.

If you are willing to let IPE go gray (a very plain look to many), it will likely last 30+ years and it may even outlast your pressure-treated supports, whether or not you sand away this whiskering effect or not. With cedar, sealing is mandatory, not optional, and the new growth cedar still won't last as long as an untreated IPE deck.

Of course, if you want your IPE deck to have that hardwood floor look, whisker free and warmly colored, you can always try the patented John Hyatt method of layering TWP.

I got a vinyl railing so I don't have to worry about staining the uprights. I just need a paint pad on a stick and a couple of hours once a year to keep the horizontal decking surface looking nice.

Cedar does still have its place, however. After all, it's 30%-50% less expensive than an IPE deck in my neck of the woods.


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RE: IPE Deck

He did say that cedar would rot before the ipe would, but he gave cedar a 20 year lifespan. He is going to give me price estimates on both knotted and clear cedars, as well as ipe. My deck is only 350sq ft, only 2-3 ft off the ground, and it's what he'd consider a "small" job. Accordingly, his telephone guess-timate on ipe gave me hope that we can afford it (still need to run this by my husband). It was pricey but not that much more.

The contractor does have experience with ipe--I spoke with one of his very satisfied ipe clients (a huge and elaborate deck project, that was). And he did say it was a nice material for decks, and that if we were even considering clear cedar, we might as well choose ipe because it wouldn't be that much more.

About the whiskers: just how bad is it? Is it something I can live with if we're going for the grayed-effect? We don't go out there barefoot, but the outer perimeter of the deck is open bench. We have deck chairs that we use, but I suppose there may be a day when someone might want to sit on the benches or go out there barefoot. I don't mind if it's not pristinely-smooth, but I don't want someone to injure themselves with splinters. And, if it is really bad that sanding is necessary, can I have someone do it once and for all, or is it a recurring thing?

I appreciate all your help, everyone.


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RE: IPE Deck

No problem about hijacking the post! I welcome the discussion. We chose IPE because we wanted something different, nicer than PT. We are not just going for the lifespan of the material, but also the look. As far as the whiskers is concerned, we have small kids (7 months to 4 years) who are down on their hands and knees all the time. Our old PT deck was just constantly giving off large slinters whenever you touched the railing. The IPE is nothing, nothing like that. But we do want a 'smooth' surface and to preserve the color.

I am going to sand with the orbital this weekend, rub with acetone and do test spots of Cabots and TWP. I could not get samples of the Sikkens SRD, so the choice may come down to those two.

Question: some have suggested putting the acetone in a spray bottle, and the the TWP in a spray bottle (obviously not the same bottle ;-). Is it ok to use plastic? won't the sprayer put a lot of bubbles into the TWP?

Thanks again,
Howard


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RE: IPE Deck

Blueiris,

It seems you're chasing the Holy Grail of zero-maintenance, and just want to let your deck go. Just understand that letting a deck gray naturally still requires maintenance--cleaning, removing mildew, etc.

Moreover, because Ipe is so smooth, its finish can be put on with a "pad on a stick" rather quickly, which means preserving that "look" is less labor-intensive than you might be envisioning. Even if you decide to hand rub after the initial application.

Sprinks


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RE: IPE Deck

To explain my situation more, I currently have a PT deck (made of the "old" PT variety). It needs to be replaced not because of mold, mildew, bad looks, or anything else--a huge tree crashed on it and destroyed it. We haven't babied it, we haven't sealed or washed it in years (and from the looks of it, the previous owners did nothing to it, either). Yes, it has some splitering/checking and some cracking, and yes, it's almost completely gray. But we would have kept it if it weren't totalled.

Sprinks, naturally I'd tend to the deck if there were mildew on it or if it were dirty. But I've never had those problems despite my lack of maintainence with our PT deck. I want to make sure that I'm not taking a step backward with the material we choose for the rebuild. From reading here, it seemed to me that sealing for PT and cedar are required, and that for ipe it's just optional. I had also read that ipe is mildew and rot-resistant, but your comment now makes me think otherwise.

Yes, we want to let the deck "go" in the sense that it's not our style to have a pristine-looking deck out there. We don't particularly care about preserving "the look." I know others have different preferences and needs and I respect that. My main concern about "zero maintenance" is if I have to maintain it in order to keep it from deteriorating functionally (splintering, rotting). We didn't choose to have a deck--it was attached to the house we bought. I do appreciate your comment, and if we decide to keep the appearance of ipe, I'm glad to know that finishing it is not as hard as a prospective contractor would have me believe.

I'd still love to know about those whiskers/fuzz:
--How big/pronounced are they? Is it more like a putting green, or more like pieces of hay? Can we still use the deck with them?
--If I do have someone sand them off, do I have to repeat the process over time, or is it solved with one sanding?


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RE: IPE Deck (2)

...and for Howard-PA's sake, I hope someone can answer his sprayer questions, along with my whiskers questions. (Sorry again to Howard for the hijack!)


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RE: IPE Deck

Sorry guys, I got nothin' about sprayers or whiskers. :-)

Sounds like a day at the cat groomer, though.

Anyway, knotty cedar is not likely to last 20 years. Clear cedar will, but the kotty stuff is mostly sapwood and it is not as naturally decay or insect resistant. And around here, clear cedar is way more expensive than IPE.

The closest thing to truly zero maintenance that I have seen is vinyl. If you can live with the plasticy, unnatural feel and look of it, why not look into that? It's about as close to zero maintenance as you can get.

I've heard good things about Care Free vinyl decks.


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RE: IPE Deck

My neighbors are very happy with their no-maintenance Trex type deck. They get a static charge when walking on it, however!

As far as the whisker size, we're talking peach fuzz here. I was just out back and thinking it was more pronounced on the railings than the deckboards - this may be due to the action of walking on the deck or perhaps the cut of the wood?

Either way, I am about to take the sander to it before it rains this afternoon...My wife liked...drumroll...TWP #116, so that is what we will go with. Thanks to all who recommended it!


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RE: IPE Deck

I'll have to see how the estimates come in for clear cedar and ipe, and compare with PT. If the whiskers are like peach fuzz, then I can definitely live with that. I was getting worried it was more spikey and dangerous to sit upon. Howard, I hope your project is going well! Thanks everyone, for the additional comments.


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RE: IPE Deck

I hate someone got the impression from a contractor that Ipe is labor intensive. From one who only gets them every now and then (considering I live in PT land!) we LOVE working with this wood. We hand rub all the Ipe - and frankly, even after using a stripper which usually will cause fuzzies on wood, the Ipe has far far less. It's not the actual work that's hard, it's the knowledge of the application processes and performing them efficiently that is where a contractor has a edge.


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just finished

with TWP 116 rustic (pretty color) and our deck looks great. Did the two coat wet on wet application; we didn't sand at all. Granted there were a few places where sanding would have improved a watermark or band place, but hey this is a deck that is going to get a lot of use. We did wash with oxalic first; it cleaned everything nicely. We had no places that were rough, fuzzy, or splintered enough to cause a problem with swiping the applicator or feeling prickly on bare feet. Ipe is great wood in our opinion. We used it to replace a 32 year old redwood deck. Raining hard here today and TWP looks beautiful, even, and water beading up just like it should.

Thanks John!


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RE: IPE Deck

What is IPE? Please? Never heard of it. My husband is a carpenter and hasn't heard of it. PLease inform us as to what it is. We have plans to expand our deck and if there is something better out there than what we have, I would like to know more about it.

Thanks,
poptart


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RE: IPE Deck

IPE is a South American hardwood. It also goes by the trade names of Pau Lope, Diamond Decking, and some others.

If you do a search for the words "Ipe" and "Decks" on Google, you'll find lots of information.

This wood is not perfect, but as far as natural products go, it's about as good as it gets. Many consider it to be the finest decking material available. Here are some pros and cons so you can make your own decision:

PROS:
1) Highly resistant to decay and insect damage. Will last 25-40 years, even if you never seal it.
2) A beautiful, smooth hardwood. Applying a finish is easy because the wood is so smooth.
3) Class-A fire resistance rating (same as concrete).
4) Resistant to cracking and splintering (It may check or crack a little, but nothing like cedar).
5) It's real wood, so you can always sand it if you need to for any reason
6) Mildew is not the problem that it can be with composites
7) It's very hard (It does not scratch like soft woods or composites).
8) Very strong, does not bend or flex easily.

CONS:
1) More expensive than Cedar or Composite
2) Requires special tools and experience to work with it.
3) Highly resistant to finishes -- because of its dense cell structure and its natural oils, most finishes last a year or less. Some exceptions may exist. I'm testing TWP now.


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RE: IPE Deck

If it's so good, why aren't houses being built with it? Houses would last 25 to 40 years too. Now that would be worth the investment.


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RE: IPE Deck

Houses built with IPE? Can you imagine the labor and materials cost?

I'm guessing it would be cheaper to frame your house with metal since they already have pre-made components.

Also, if properly insulated from the elements, houses last a good deal longer than 25-40 years. The problem with a deck is that it's a horizontal surface with no protection from rain, snow, ice, freezing, etc. Because of the constant exposure to the elements, decks need to be built of something that is inherently resistant to them.

Although in South America, I do believe they use it for houses, boats, docks, etc.


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RE: IPE Deck

Ipe is really heavy, does not float, and looks great!

Hammer a nail in it and it cracks! Great for floors!

One year old deck with fasteners. No screw heads, no nail heads! No cupping, warping! I We used liquid nails and the clip!

Used penofin prepdeck to clean and brighten, and then the exoitc oil for UV protection. Requires second coat in 4 mos! Don't forget this!

It works for us, is very fogiving and if you scratch it, you can fix very easy. If you neglect it, just repeat process. Prepdeck


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RE: IPE Deck

New to the site, enjoying the discussions.

For my deck finishing, I used Sikkens Cetol SRD, a single coat application - also looks great!

I'm completing a deck from Brazilian Redwood (Massaranduba), similiar to IPE wood types in longevity, hardness, durability, etc. Really beautiful -- like Johnplace said, solid flooring for a deck -- nothing looks finer! This wood is the choice decking material in South America and parts of Europe. It is also cheaper than the IPE varieties and may be cheaper than California redwood too.

IPE is rapidly getting more expensive because it is in favor with the Japanese market and are buying huge quantities of the wood. More demand, up goes the cost. Check out the Massaranduba - worth the effort.
Exotic wood decks are not exceptionally hard to construct, especially with the underneath DECKMASTER Hidden Deck Bracket System. I butt-ended the boards together as I didn't want the gapped board look. Like any of the preferred decking woods, finishing is the key if you want to retain the natural color and look. Why build with expensive wood and let it go grey? Cheaper pressure treated lumber does that.

A note on composites. I have several neighbors who built composite decks late last year (this is a new housing development). This summer, the composite decking is retaining so much heat (the surface is HOT!) they cannot let their little kids out on them barefoot during the day or they may burn their feet.

Hope this helps.


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RE: IPE Deck

I'm not a fan of composites, but I do believe that some of them are supposed to be cooler on the feet than others.

Just as an FYI, my IPE deck gets so hot that I cannot walk on it barefoot. One day I thought I had burn blisters on my feet. Since then, I keep the shoes on. The heat probably has something to do with the dark color of the stain I applied.


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RE: IPE Deck

TBoltman, welcome to the forum. I hate to have to disagree with you but the Deckmaster system is trouble waiting to happen. I wouldn't recommend anyone using it.


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RE: IPE Deck

TBoltman said: "Why build with expensive wood and let it go grey? Cheaper pressure treated lumber does that."

...I'm now beginning to reconsider IPE. When I mentioned that I want to rebuild our demolished PT deck with IPE but let it go gray, some comments made me think I am crazy. Some tell me that it's not that much effort to maintain the look of IPE, and that might be true--I don't doubt the forum members! It's just that we don't care about maintaining the *appearance* of a deck. My main interest lies in how sound the wood would be, in withstanding harsh seasons (snow and heat) for our remaining years in this home--decades, we hope. I thought that IPE would be a superior choice for durability reasons and easy care if we let it weather. But maybe PT is the way to go, after all.

I'm so frustrated. We have a busted-up deck (it's been weeks and weeks) and we're still waiting for bids to come in. *sigh*


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RE: IPE Deck

TBoltman said: "Why build with expensive wood and let it go grey? Cheaper pressure treated lumber does that."

Make no mistake BlueIris, a gray PT deck and a gray IPE deck are not even in the same ballpark. Pressure Treated Lumber cracks, twists, warps, and splinters. A properly installed IPE deck is not prone to doing any of these things.

A grey IPE deck looks plain, maybe a little boring.

A grey PT decks looks ugly as sin.

A stained IPE decks is the most beautiful deck that money can buy.

A stained PT deck is still ugly as sin.


Just my personal opinion. Don't lynch me.


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RE: IPE Deck

Johnplace:

"A grey IPE deck looks plain, maybe a little boring.
A grey PT decks looks ugly as sin."

LOL. Mine is ugly as sin, all right, especially in its partially-demolished state!

Thanks again for your comments.


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RE: IPE Deck

Some people like the natural grey. Depends on your home, and railing type. A grey deck with white rail might look nice.

Find some pictures, a boardwalk, brooklyn bridge, etc and see for yourself. Atlantic city boardwalk I believe used IPE and I doubt finishes it. I attached a link, and you may also want to do your own google image search.

the boardwalk in atlantic city is 25 years old, is sitting right on the ocean, and gets more foot traffic in a summers day than your deck will likeley get in a lifetime!

Here is a link that might be useful: Ironwoods


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RE: IPE Deck

Ipe has been in comerical counstruction for 100 years or so, none of the big name projects mentioned got any finish at all with the given of mustared,squshed hot dogs, and spilled beer, them boys just hose it off.Side note>> Brazlian Redwood is some good stuff too<< John


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RE: IPE Deck

When my husband chose ipe for our decks 5 years ago, folks in this neck of the woods had never heard of it. It cost a bundle to get it, and installing it was a huge pain (did it ourselves with a biscuit joiner.)
BlueIris... the description of "slightly fuzzy" after several years without treatment is most accurate. It doesn't actually get really gray, not like regular untreated wood. And the grain does not rise, it stays perfectly flat. After 5 years of deck furniture dragged across it, and huge dogs scrabbling around on it, our ipe decks do not have a single scratch or ding. Since we live on our decks year-round (barefoot as much as we can) that's pretty amazing. What you save in maintenance and splinters makes up for the initial cost.
However, I have a big yen to try some of the suggestions from you folks to really swank my decks up for a big party in a couple of weeks. I will be back with questions, I'm sure! Thanks!


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RE: IPE Deck

Wishccr, thank you for your comments regarding your experience with ipe. I'm glad to hear it's working out for you, and I now feel better about the "fuzz" issue, too. We're still trying to get estimates here, so we haven't made our final decision yet. This additional information is helpful to us, though!


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RE: IPE Deck

I have one last question from you folks that know a lot about ipe.

My husband claims the life of ipe is not extended by applying finishes. He doesn't want me to put anything on the ipe decks, he likes them the way they are.

We installed our ipe decks five years ago and never treated them. They are not "grayed", but have a soft, dulled look to them because they have never been treated.

Thanks!


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RE: IPE Deck

wishccr,

I am certainly open to the possibility that what your husband says is true (about finishes not extending the life of IPE), but I would be very interested in seeing the scientific study that proves this. If he has such documentation, please post a link.

The way I look at it, IPE is a wood that will last a very long time (30+ years) even if you never seal it. It would not be uncommon for the decking to outlast the support structure underneath or to outlast the person who built the deck. In either of these cases, getting an extra 30 years (by sealing) out of the decking is a benefit not likely to be reaped by someone who would know the difference.

But IPE is still wood, and over time it will still fall prey to the same elements that cause all organic matter to decay. So I would say that religious sealing of the wood, once a year, would add longevity. This is what believe currently. But I'm always open to new data.


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RE: IPE Deck

There are fence posts in S America that have been in the ground for 100 years or so,comerical projects have been done with ipe for about the same time span including boat docks,like the kind they run two story crains on. As a Given this material was installed in a different way but its the same stuff, no finish at all. With our projects we like to see the color of ipe,and we can with the right finish see that for a long time. John


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RE: IPE Deck

Thank you John and John,

Your comments make a lot of sense. I think my husband is beginning to come around. Although the ipe still looks great, it would be nice to have the warm wood tone, so I think we may stain it and see if we like it.

Pam


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RE: IPE Deck

"Although in South America, I do believe they use it for houses, boats, docks, etc."

I read somewhere that it is also used for railway ties. The stuff is obviously a lot cheaper down there than what we pay after it is shipped here. I believe they simply pile and burn many of the trees to clear land for soybean crops. Wish we could afford to use it for framing. It would certainly beat PT pine.

My 150 years-old house is framed with yellow poplar. It's not all that hard, and is prone to rot when it stays wet, but it seems to be resistant to termites.

About 15 years ago, I had an old one-room schoolhouse moved onto my property to use as a workshop building. The sill was made of poplar, except for one short section, which used oak. The poplar was mostly intact, with a few rotten spots here and there, but the oak section was practically gone - just a few fragments remaining, and the rest of the space was partially filled with residue that looked like dirt. I couldn't find a replacement piece of poplar, so I laminated together a couple of pieces of 2 X 10 pressue treated and trimmed it to the proper size.


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RE: IPE Deck

"Although in South America, I do believe they use it for houses, boats, docks, etc."

I read somewhere that it is also used for railway ties. The stuff is obviously a lot cheaper down there than what we pay after it is shipped here. I believe they simply pile and burn many of the trees to clear land for soybean crops. Wish we could afford to use it for framing. It would certainly beat PT pine.

My 150 years-old house is framed with yellow poplar. It's not all that hard, and is prone to rot when it stays wet, but it seems to be resistant to termites.

About 15 years ago, I had an old one-room schoolhouse moved onto my property to use as a workshop building. The sill was made of poplar, except for one short section, which used oak. The poplar was mostly intact, with a few rotten spots here and there, but the oak section was practically gone - just a few fragments remaining, and the rest of the space was partially filled with residue that looked like dirt. I couldn't find a replacement piece of poplar, so I laminated together a couple of pieces of 2 X 10 pressue treated and trimmed it to the proper size.


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RE: IPE Deck

Ipe house would be cool! Huff and puff and nobody gonna knock it down!


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RE: IPE Deck

Hi

I just finished having a ipe deck built and am very happy with it..One quick question...The first coat of TWP 116 was put on directly after sanding and I think we put it on too thick..thus there are multiple drip marks primarily on the risers...Im planning to resand tommorow and apply a second coat of 116 the first of the week...Will this be my best bet?

Thanks everyone for a great info source in this forum!!!


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RE: IPE Deck

Just joined this discussion and would like to know where you buy the Aussie Wood Oil and the TWP116. We have a Brazilian Redwood deck and we have to stain it about every 4 months. We do have 4 labs that are hard on it. Any info would help. Thank you


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RE: IPE Deck

We just installed a large ipe deck and were recommended to use linseed oil on it. Would appreciate any comments pro or con.


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RE: IPE Deck

Ghesssss this is a really old thing,it always better to start a new topic with questions.

Anyway,Do,Not, Use, Linseed Oil,on any outdoor project. For a lot of reasons, I cant belive this is still alive, thats like 40 year old advice. John


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RE: IPE Deck

There is a lot of information here. I hope maybe I can give a few insights into what I know about the subject of ipe and other Amazonian hardwoods.

Ipe is not really that good for ground contact. It will rot with direct contact with the soil in our climate here in Amazonia. It is has not been used much as a choice for fence posts for this reason. But, if it is not in contact with the soil it will pretty much last forever. At least longer than most of us will be on the planet. The prime woods used here for fence posts are Itauba, angelim vermelho, pequia, and a few other lesser known species. Massaranduba also known as Brazilian redwood is a very good wood for outdoor non ground contact uses as well. By not being good for ground contact I mean it will not last much more than 10 years. While some of the above may be fine for 50 years.

Ipe has been one of the prime flooring woods used for probably 300 years or more in Brazil. It is the equivalent to oak in flooring applications in Southern Brazil.

The big advantage to ipe is the stability when air dried. There are few species that move as little as ipe. It also does not surface check very much.

About 20 years ago or so they used to make prefab country homes for use in Southern Brazil out of ipe to a large degree. As the cost increased they switched to garapa and other cheaper and more abundant woods.

In the area I work we have a lot of Massaranduba and Europe is the major consumer. The Europeans use the antislip profile on boards which hides defects somewhat. And, they do not use wood finishes much from what I understand. In addition the climate in Northern Europe is more humid and stable than most of the USA which is better for Massaranduba. If Massaranduba is properly dried it is fine in any climate.

Ipe has gotten very expensive in Brazil and I think it is time for the USA market to look seriously at other wood species for decking. Which has been happening. This is also better for sustainable forest management as it uses the resource better and helps preserve the standing forest.

Here are a few pictures of Massaranduba being sawn into deck blanks which were shipped to Holland to be milled into decking there.

Hopefully some will find it interesting to see where the material comes from.

Massaranduba logs on the sawmill line.

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Massaranduba being sawn.

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A massaranduba log. You can see the red color. The tree has a high latex content and is mixed into natural rubber in some places to enhance quality of the mixture. The white streaks is the latex from the bark of the tree.

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The boards which are 32 MM X 155 MM are cut to length. For Europe that is every foot from 7 feet up to 20 feet.

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Being packed for shipment.

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Here is an order of rough sawn ipe going to the USA.

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RE: IPE Deck

What is the best product for staining to show the color best and longest. I've had the deck stained professionally twice and I think the contractor used TWP, but i am unsure. Any suggestions?

steve


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RE: IPE Deck

Don its always a pleasure when you post over here. Dont think I dont see you with that water bottle, Just Kidding!!!

Your pictures always reinforce my Respect for the South American Lumber. And the info on the different ways they can be used to the best advantage is very good for me and my Customer.

I wish I could figure out a way to market angelim vermelho in the usa. This would completley stop all the marketing hype/ and down right silly stuff involved with presure treated lumber and make live for us deck builders much less complex.

I have been pitching Garapa with high sucess latley great material installed corectley.

Anyway good to see ya Man...John Mon


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RE: IPE Deck

Hey John,
That post from Don is from 2007. This guy from Woodstock just rejuvenated it...for no reason. This thread actually started in 2005. I thought about Don the other day when I heard about unusually bad flooding in Amazonas. Hope he's OK.

steve


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RE: IPE Deck

O Man!!! ghessss. Thanks Steve I dident notice that switched posting.

That makes the non responce from Don on a Comm loading dock he was building understanble. Dammmmm I am hoping the man got tru it as well. J.


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RE: IPE Ramp hazard - Help

Although this thread is old, perhaps someone can still comment on my problem.
Recently installed and stained ipe entry walkway with slight incline/ramp from street level. Asthetically, the result is excellent, however have had occasional freezing temperatures causing both visible and invisible (black ice) hazardous surface. Have sustained two potentially dangerous falls. Ramp area is approx 6'x12' Can anyone suggest a surface coating or method of minimizing this hazardous condition. Thanks....Hal


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RE: IPE Deck

I am no expert, but I have seen folks use a Shark Grip additive in concrete sealer around pools. I would think that you could find something similar for a film-forming stain. Trouble is you are putting a film forming stain down which could be a long-term maintenance issue when it peels, but if your entry is covered you may not have the breakdown that being exposed to direct sun would.

Another option that comes to mind is actually taking your circular saw out and making some shallow cuts. You would have to be very careful to make sure you did some sort of geometric design so you don't ruin your deck. If you could layout a star emblem or something cool, then it just might work. Let me caviat this by saying I have never seen this done and don't know if it would work, but maybe someone else can chime in.

Maybe some pics would help?

Riles


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