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How to determine if property is pool-ready -- NJ

Posted by Fat_Al (My Page) on
Fri, Sep 13, 13 at 12:06

Hi, apologies in advance for my total ignorance, but here goes. We are looking to purchase a house in Monmouth County and we are looking at places that have enough land to add a small pool (we're looking in the Bradley Beach/Avon area). However, before we actually close on something we need to confirm that the property can actually support a pool (I guess I'm thinking of things like the ground conditions, utility pipes that might be underground, etc.).

First question is whether that is something we actually need to do. Second is how we would go about doing it. Is it an engineer issue, pool contractor, etc?

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Al


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RE: How to determine if property is pool-ready -- NJ

Having moved more times than I have fingers and toes and have lived in Monmouth and Morris county rely on the written word when it comes to the pool.
You need to talk to the person who will grant you a permit to dig for an inground pool. Do not rely on the realtor since they really just want to sell you a home and most time any home.
Call the town hall of Bradley Beach or Avon. Most municipalities have part time zoning officials so find out a head of time what are their working hours. Make sure they are not on vacation.
When in living in Morris county I had to deal with wetland officials and building officials . Ask who is involved in the pool build.
Living in a new state I had to deal with zoning, conservation and wetlands in order to build the pool.
I had to mark my electric, water, well, sewer . leach fields, communication and gas lines before the pool was dug.
Nj also has a call before you dig where they will place flags in red and yellow to indicate gas and electric lines These flags are not 100 percent reliable and can be off a few feet.
In Morris county there are old iron mines that are now collapsing so sink holes are common .
we had a neighbor while living in Morris county who removed 2 acres of forest. Erosion was a huge issue in the Spring since we lived below them. Run off was not collected by the sewers and created there own path. No doubt that "water travels in the least resistance"
So look at the topography of the property and neighboring homes.
Distance to over head electric lines change with each municipality.
An honest pool builder could help you define some of the issues if he worked in the area but having just installed an inground pool , the builder was very nice before I signed the contract and now I am pulling teeth to get things addressed.

A pool needs water, electric and a place to rest.
Make sure the electric main panel can support the pool addition or possible added costs. The greater the distance to the panel the more money. Look to see if you will need a retaining wall. Will the pool site be in full sun or partial sun. Will you need tree removal. Are you permitted to remove the trees. In Morris county if you touched tress in wetland areas you could be fined.

Basically know the zoning laws and have them in writing.
A local town official gave me verbal permission to move the pool dig dirt. He had a senior moment and forgot about wetland regulations. I had to spend 2500 dollars for that mistake.

Get info in writing whether it be my e-mail or town letter head documents.

You are being smart to ask ahead.
Good Luck


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RE: How to determine if property is pool-ready -- NJ

Thanks for the detailed answer. On first read, it scares me, but that's probably a good thing. All the more reason to get prepared.


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