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Toilet lowered to subfloor

Posted by mcgregor287287 (My Page) on
Sun, Aug 21, 11 at 16:16

I just removed the ceramic tile from the bathroom floor - and under the toilet. Toilet now sits directly on the subloor. It seems to be working fine, and no leaks. We did have two O rings in there when it was up on the tile, so I assume they are just absorbing some of the pressure from the toilet. I just want to leave the toilet where it is for the time being and put in a temporary vinyl floor right over the subfloor. Does anyone see an inherent problem with this - or should it be okay? I really have no knowledge of toilets/plumbing, so based on answers here, I might need to call a professional. Thank you!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

By O-rings, do you mean toilet flange spacers?

The toilet flange itself needs to be supported. The drain lines are just PVC and cannot support weight on their own. It is quite common to see spacers used with a tile job to raise the height of the flange flush with the tile. If that is what happened and the flange is still supported, you should be fine. If the flange is just hanging out in midair and you are pushing it down with the toilet, then that is a problem.


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

It is more likely that he is referring to double wax rings, which is a total code violation.

Per code, the underside of the closet flange is to be in firm contact with the finished floor, which leaves the top surface about 1/4" above the floor.

Code prohibits installing the flange flush with or recessed below the finished floor.


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

So, is there an acceptable range for the distance between the top of the flange and the drain-port (is this called the trap?) rim on the bottom of the toilet? I assume the wax ring is meant to close/seal this gap.

When my toilet sits on the floor, the drain-port that matches up with the hole in the flange is about 1/4" off the floor, (but I'd have to check the exact measurement).

I just bought a flange today that is 7/16" thick, which may be too thick to allow the toilet to sit on it's apron rim, causing a tippy and leaky toilet.

Thanks,

Bill


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

Closet flanges are made to very strict ASTM specifications so you need not worry about the thickness of the flange, however the flange MUST BE mounted so the underside of the flange is securely fastened in firm contact with the finished floor.

The thickness of the flanges and the vertical recess in the bowl are both carefully controlled so that the Wax Gasket can effect a proper seal.

Photobucket


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

Thanks for the clarificatin, lazypup. What software do you use for drawing - nice job.


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

I use the microsoft "PAINT" program which is prepacked on most computers


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

I have paint but I don't think I could make a drawing that good.

OK, so today I installed my new flange, bottom flush with floor and the toilet didn't have the room underneath to clear it. I had to shim it to eliminate the rocking. The flange was just a little too thick. I've read in forums, (for example: http://www.terrylove.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-25739.html, that this is a problem out there in the real world.

Bill


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

The problem is not the flange. The problem is an uneven floor.


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

How long is temporary?


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

Question for lazy pup,
You said the closet flange must be connected to a closet bend. When using 3" lines is it possible to connect the toilet flange to a long radius 90 and a length of pipe instead of a closet bend? Is it better to use a closet bend?


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RE: Toilet lowered to subfloor

A long radius 90 would be acceptable.

Under the code the water closet must be on the upstream end of the line. It may not be connected to a Wye & 1/8bend, Combo or Tee.


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