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Yams & Sweet potatoes

Posted by beegood (My Page) on
Sat, Nov 14, 09 at 14:37

My Boxer & Shih Tzus love raw Yams & Sweet potatoes. They get them as treats. Is there anything in these veggies that can harm them. Thanks for any info .


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

They're not harmful but they are starchy/caloric - so use them sparingly (dogs appreciate tiny pieces as much as big ones).


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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

Raw or cooked???


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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

I feed them raw. Only small pieces. A yam or S.P. lasts more than a week between the 3 of them. And these are only about 8 inch ones.


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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

I am guessing these are given as treats as you have described giving them small pieces. If you want them to get any nutritional value from them however, they should be cooked. Dogs digestive systems don't have the proper enzymes to break down plant material in the raw state. Either way, it's a treat for them though! :)


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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

Yes these are just treats. I figure they are probably better then a lot of those cookies etc. And they are cheap and my dogs love them. Tried carrots but they just chew on them and all I am left with is a bunch of carrot pieces to clean up.


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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

You should really cook the treats.


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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

WHY should I cook them.? Just curious. They are not part of their regular food. Thanks every one for your input.


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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

3. Vegetables
Vegetables include plants that grow above and below the ground such as: green leafy
vegetables, asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, chard, dandelion greens,
dark leaf lettuce, kale, okra, parsley, sprouts, squash, pumpkin, etc. (above) and:
sweet potatoes, yams, carrots, etc. (below). However, they must be in a digestable
form, similar to what would be in a prey animal's stomach. We can mimic this by
chopping in a food processor or blender or chopping with a knife and lightly steaming
them. It is best to leave out potatoes, onions and rhubarb. Limit or avoid raw legumes
(peas and beans), but do use their sprouted seeds. Make sure that there is only a low
level of the starchy vegetables like pumpkin (although sweet potatoes do tend to be
extremely digestible especially for those with allergies), and not a preponderance of the
sugary vegetables such as carrots.

Sweet Potatoes and Oxalates

Sweet potatoes are among a small number of foods that contain measurable amounts of oxalates, naturally-occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. When oxalates become too concentrated in body fluids, they can crystallize and cause health problems. For this reason, individuals with already existing and untreated kidney or gallbladder problems may want to avoid eating sweet potatoes. Laboratory studies have shown that oxalates may also interfere with absorption of calcium from the body. Yet, in every peer-reviewed research study we've seen, the ability of oxalates to lower calcium absorption is relatively small and definitely does not outweigh the ability of oxalate-containing foods to contribute calcium to the meal plan. If your digestive tract is healthy, and you do a good job of chewing and relaxing while you enjoy your meals, you will get significant benefits - including absorption of calcium - from calcium-rich foods plant foods that also contain oxalic acid.


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RE: Yams & Sweet potatoes

Thank you. I guess there will be no more raw Ys & SPs for the dogs. The last thing I would want for them to have is kidney failure.I worked on a dialysis unit for 25 yrs and tho it isn't the same it is not something I would knowingly do to my dogs. Life with kidney failure no matter who has it is not nice.


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