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a ** red zone ** dog

Posted by toomuchglass (My Page) on
Fri, Mar 25, 11 at 23:07

I got my dog from our local humane society - and I had free obedience classed included ... There were about 12 people with their dogs in the class. One lady I talked to said the dog she adopted was considered by the society to be a "red zone" dog. Adopt at your own risk . In class -- this dog was the biggest sweetheart & smart as a whip . I never got the lady's name , but I ran into her at Petsmart months later & asked about her dog. She said he's the best dog there ever was ,gentle as a lamb & getting smarter every day.

This made me wonder about who is assessing these dogs and
what criteria makes a dog a "red zone dog" .( I live too far away to go and ask questions ) I sure hope all the dogs - whatever zone they're in is getting a fair shake at being adopted.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: a ** red zone ** dog

The ONLY way to determine the answer to your question is to ask the humane society where her dog was adopted from and ask them - especially their behavior department.
It sounds very counter intuitive...I suspect there is some eggaeration on someones part.

Basically any dog you bring home you do so at your own risk. Adopted from private breeder or public non profit.
"red zone" Is a term I have heard people who watch the dog whisperer use. It refers to a dog with extreme behavioral problems which may result in injury to those who come in contact with the animal


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RE: a ** red zone ** dog

Very often people who work at shelters have little if any formal training. They get OJT, on job training. Which is usually hit and miss.

Added to that situation is folks who mean well and organmizations with such strict rules there is no wiggle room.


Cesar uses dog psychology. Most of those other folks use dog training. Two entirely different things, IMHO. I found some of the things I have always done to train my dogs was psychology. Pack mentality and behavioral things. Others were training methods. That gets two different results. And people see two different dogs, depending on what discipline they favor or believe in.

There is nothing wrong with training a dog. But, training seldom corrects a behavioral problem. And some behavioral problems can be easily misread.


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RE: a ** red zone ** dog

Usually it's the folks who watch TV to get information on dogs who do this type of silly 'labeling'. If the only source of (mis)information they have is from an abusive handler like Cesar Milan who uses compulsion based methods on fearful dogs - well that's what you get. I do believe the general public is becoming more educated on postive methods, but until the positive methods have their own prime time television show this labeling(confusing shy fearful behaviors with 'aggression') will continue. Very sad.


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RE: a ** red zone ** dog

If a shelter believes a dog to be dangerous, it'll have the dog euthanized;
there's too much risk & too much liability.

I'd take this statement from a total stranger as a scare tactic from someone who likes to make trouble & scare people.


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RE: a ** red zone ** dog

Well if she has a well behaved dog she is not scaring people she is bragging about her dog and it recovery from being a so called red zone dog...it appears the humane society she got the dog from labelled the dog, not the current owner. Why she is repeated the informatino is the question....it serves no positive purpose


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RE: a ** red zone ** dog

I think it might......and that is to take what the shelter says with a grain of salt. I am thankful for our local shelter, and it is under newer management than when I got so many pets from them and I think it's been an improvement, but some of the things I heard from staff (and volunteers) there were sometimes not very believable. I can remember how they tried to talk my mother out of a little young bichon mix when she went to get a dog shortly after my father and his dog died. What they tried to get her to take was a very senior and very toothless dog. They said the bichon might be too much for her to handle.

Ha. Mama lived fifteen years past that. The little bichon was a faithful and gentle companion who became her ears when she went deaf and came housebroken. It brought her a lot of companionship and company and they adored each other.


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