Return to the Pets Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
What kind of worm is this?

Posted by terrapots (My Page) on
Wed, Mar 10, 10 at 22:59

I was cleaning out my cat's litter box and found a worm, looks nothing like the cat parasites but more like those worms one can find under a corn husk. It had a head with little pinchers with a body like a tiny caterpillar, about 3/4 inch long, amber in color. She threw up all her food a couple of days ago and I was wondering if this could have been in the food. It was after 5 when I found it, too late to call the vet. The vet will probably want to see it I suppose. She's a 100% indoor cat who was dewormed last year and she's been pretty active and happy, eating well, almost too well. I'm feeding her small meals because when she threw up I had filled her dish too much and she ate it all with gusto and threw it all up in front of her litter box.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: What kind of worm is this?

Sounds like a maggot not a worm...I will be waiting to hear from you what the vet has to say....


 o
RE: What kind of worm is this?

Are you sure it's not an earwig? Caterpillar's have legs (unlike worms) and what you have sounds large for a maggot. Earwigs definitely have the pinchers, but they're harmless.


 o
RE: What kind of worm is this?

I was thinking earwig too. And, are you sure it didn't come in with the litter?


 o
RE: What kind of worm is this?

Could it be a blowfly larva? They are commonly called warbles when they live under an animal's skin and when they are mature, they can reach 3/4 inch in length, and also have hooks. They drop out of animal and search for a dry place to pupate.

How does an animal get infected? Usually the blowfly will find a sore, or even a fecal matte and lay an egg there, and when the worms hatch, they burrow under the skin. Normally these are seen in outside animals. Here in S.E. Ohio you would not find blow flies around infecting animals in cold weather. But, if you live in a warm climate, they could be present year-round and could get in a house.

Here is a link that might be useful: blowfly larvae


 o
RE: What kind of worm is this?

Won't be able to take tht thing to the vet until Monday but from the link Calli gave it does look like a blowfly larvae. I've never heard of these larvae, nor seen anything like that. Just wondered if it could have been from the food she vomited. She has no teeth to masticate but in feces it still should have been digested? Anyway, I haven't seen any rotting carcasses around here lately, LOL, but I will report back if I get an answer from the vet.


 o
RE: What kind of worm is this?

No, if it were blowfly, it would not be in her stomach. They are not a true internal parasite. They not only infest rotting carcasses, but live animals. I have seen them in rabbit, cow and cats. The larvae when it is very tiny burrows under the skin and lives there until it drops out, crawls (icky, I've seen them do that) and finds a dry place to pupate.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Pets Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here