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Wolf/coyote question

Posted by cookie8 (My Page) on
Mon, Dec 3, 07 at 12:58

Over the past year either wolves or coyotes have moved into the area. There are a lot of deer, rabbits, raccoons, etc for a source of food. Does it make the area a lot more unsafe for humans? I want to ski (with a friend)at night (6:30 or so) down the trails behind our home. Do they generally keep to themselves? I think I've heard a lone one maybe once or twice during the summer but not much more than that. Thanks for any input.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Wolf/coyote question

I grew up in the Midwest----Kansas/Oklahoma---and have never heard of a coyote being a threat to humans personally unless cornered, rabid, or injured.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

You may get better exposure for this if you post in the nature forums.

I don't know the answer tho, I'm sorry. I would soil my trousers if I saw a wolf there looking a me.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Don't know where you are, wolves arent in any populated areas.. There are lots of yotes around here, they don't bother humans; but if you take a small dog with you be wary, they EAT dogs. Its always a good idea to make some noise when trekking, unless you are hunting, it lets animals know you are there and they prefer no contact w. humans. wear a small bell or ??


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Coyotes and Wolves pose a realtively small threat to humans in North America and Canada. Studies have shown that most attacks on humans are the result of humans feeding (leaving food out) for these wild animals. They will recognize a food source and keep returning.

However, coyotes are creatures of habit. So you may see the same ones traveling the same trails day after day. If you are not feeding them they should pose not threat to you.

It is also important to remember not to inadvertantly feed them by leaving food and water for your own pets outside or leaving unsecured trash cans.

There has been only one human death caused by a Coyote in the US. This was to the child of a family who left out food for they Coyote everyday at the sametime. One day the family had not put the food out yet and their 3 year old went out to greet the coyote. It attacked and killed her.

As you can see, it is important to remember that they are wild animals and keep your distance. Obviously this family became so comfortable with this wild animal that they let their child out in the yard with it.

As for your pets, a coyote/wolf can clear a 5 foot wall with no problem. However, only small pets under 20 lbs are at serious risk as this is what a coyote will generally attack. These are nocturnal creatures so it is advised not to leave your pets outside at night alone. Coyotes/wolves rarely attack a supervised pet.

If you have a tall enclosure for your pet (7+ feet) your small pet should be safe outside unsupervised. However, you will want to make sure that there is no clearance between the enclosure and the ground as the coyote/wolf can burrow under.

When the proper precautions are taken the risk of danger drops significantly. The most important thing is to take extra precautions not to feed these animals directly or indirectly (through trash, etc.).

Hope this helps!


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Is it true that some people were snatched up by wolves when they were babies and raised by the wolves?


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

I'm pretty sure they are very new to the area and only come around now and then so I don't think anyone would be feeding them although I know a lot of people feed the deer. I still get creeped out by their howling and gatherings and would hate to hear it within the same close area while skiing. Maybe it will be more of a group activity than couple. thanks.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

yea, some little kids were snatched up by the wolves. It hasnt happened in a long time now but you can still see some of the effects of traumatic experiences. Go over to hot topics and see the rabid discussions there, you will gain an better appreciation of some of the posts knowing what some have had to endure.
Down in Mexico there are some families who still have that wolf hair all over their bodies, down right frightening when you see them!

We kill a lot of coyoyes around these parts, its a big sport, but you always wonder, are they some of THOSE wolf pups?


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Quirky - You'll probably get a kick out of this site...

Here is a link that might be useful: Feral Children . Com


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

"Down in Mexico there are some families who still have that wolf hair all over their bodies, down right frightening when you see them!"

That "wolf hair" all over the bodies of some of the families in Mexico has NOTHING to do with wolves, children being abducted by wolves, or rabies. So you are saying that these "wolf haired Mexicans" are descendents of wolves, rapid people, or what? Do you really think that children raised by wolves would develop wolf hair? Come on. And if you happened to read that feral children who had been abducted by wolves were found with hair on their bodies, that is simply not true - there is no evidence of that, and there are many explanations as to why some might have believed that to be true (e.g., dirty skin that looked that hair).

People who have what you referred to as "wolf hair" have a condition known as the "Werewolf Syndrome" - the actual name for it is hypertrichosis. This is a medical condition that causes excessive hair growth. It has absolutely nothing to do with wolves. And you say it's downright frightening? How do you think the people who have this condition feel?? Would you look at someone with Down's Syndrome and say it's "downright frightening" to look at them?


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

if the kids nursed the wolfs milk, wouldnt that make their hair look kinda wolfy? How bout Tarzan, he was raised by apes ya know. I know about hybridizing birds but not too much bout wolves. I did read about a large bird, Eagles I think, which stole people, I think thats where the Thunderbirds come from!

Those wolf boys from mexico, didnt they take financial advantage of their condotion?? I thiought I read that they did, not positive tho.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

So since I drink cow's milk, will I grow cow hair?

Yes, the family from Mexico did take financial advantage of their condition by taking part in the circus. But they didn't have much choice. They were considered "freaks" and were poor. I don't know if I would say they took "advantage" - they were trying to support themselves.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Have you DNAd your hair? it could be cowey!
I drank a lot of goat milk and I have a goatee, so see, proof!


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Given some of the kids I deal with that were raised by so called human parents, I think wolves would have done a better job!


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

My wife and lost our 14 yr old wolf - Kenai this past year. We have a ranch with sheep and dairy goats, kenai was raised with these animals. He had a very sensitive and calm nature, he would play with the barn cats even protect the lambs and goat kids. By nature a wolf will avoid conflict so they do not make good guard animals. They have to be raised a bit different in that the owner must become a wolf, assert alpha status and greet, interact and react like a wolf. If you can master this you have a pack mate for life. I trusted Kenai with the stock where as I do not trust the herding dogs we have. My greatest preditor problema are from two sources people and domestic dogs. Give me a wolf any day!


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Is it true that some people were snatched up by wolves when they were babies and raised by the wolves?

You are joking aren't you?


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Has anyone heard of this cougar sound deterrent for coyotes? We are moving to property on a coyote hunting route (the neighbor's cats were eaten alive in his yard in daylight). If this deterrent works, it would sure save us alot of trouble.

Our only other idea is electric fencing, though it would have to be extensive. We have heard that coyotes can climb almost any height fence, and jump over electric if they have clearance on each side. Unlike wolves, coyotes usually hunt solo (except for moms with pups), and can be very crafty. They will normally avoid people, but have been known to perform a "run-by snatching" of pets right next to humans. My sister lost her Chihuahua to a coyote during daylight right outside her back door while waiting for him to pee!

Here is a link that might be useful: Phantom Pest Wildlife Deterrent


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

"Our only other idea is electric fencing, though it would have to be extensive."

There is an alternative- Coyote Roller fencing- link below.

Also there are several breeds of dogs that could easily keep your property coyote free.

Here is a link that might be useful: Coyote Roller


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Don't know about wolves, but coyotes prey on any domestic pets which may be outside and in rare instances on small children. I've heard of coyote attacks on chilren twice in recent years, the second one just a week or so ago.

Here is a link that might be useful: coyote attack


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Ya just gotta know Quirky! Always stirring up laughter!


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

the couger devise is at this website: http://www.freewebs.com/walnut_creek_enterprises/????

i wondered if anyone had any experience with the devise...if it works it would be worth the price to protect my cats...they love being outside, but don't have a clue what danger they are in. i was also considering a fenced in area with a wire mesh cover to protect them and hopefully protect most of the wildlife from them...the fence would need to be extended somehow undergrond to avoid digging under.


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RE: coyote question...

i'm sorry to be repetative...i didn't see you had put a website for the phantom pest.

i would be interested in knowing if anyone has tried the coyote roller, ansd where can i find out about guard dogs as a coyote deterrent?


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

I have livesotck guardian dogs (Akbash, Kuvasz and Anatolian Shepherds)to keep predators out and coyote rollers installed on my fences to keep the dogs in. Both work very well.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

is it more the kind of training the dog has, than the particular breed? and why would llamas and donkeys deter coyotes? if the dogs weren't there, do you think the coyotes would be stopped by the rollers? do you think they would be better than an electric wire on top the fence?

the couger device evidently keeps deer away and probably other wildlife that i really prefer to have around, but i guess it's a choice i'll have to make if i get it.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Livestock guardian breeds have been specifically developed to protect flocks. LGD's like the Pyr, Anatolian, Komondor, etc. typically have a low prey drive (with some training, but not nearly the amount of effort it would take to train, say, a Rott or GSD)and will not chase stock. Submissive behavior towards stock coupled with territorial and dog aggression makes them extremely effective against predators. However, all LGD's should have an experienced owner.
Llamas and donkeys are dog-haters and will protect a flock against coyotes and stray dogs. Wolves may be too much for them and they will not protect against bears or big cats.
I have had dogs escape from hot-wired enclosures. If they can get out, certainly predators can enter. I have had zero escapes from enclosures with coyotes rollers.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

thank you...that gives me a lot to think about!


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

We have timberwolves and coyotes at our "new" home of almost 3 years. They haven't bothered anything yet. The big timber trots down our driveway about 15 feet from the house occasionally. The coyotes stay out in the field far away from the house.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

I live in a very rural area that is populated with coyotes and packs of coy dogs... they smell human from quite a distance and always beat a hasty retreat... I hear them at night, I see evidence of them in the light of day... but I've never heard of any wanting to get close to humans, or any that have caused harm to anyone.

They usually raid the garbage and run at the first sniff of human scent.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

Just wanted to follow up on our experience with the Phantom Pest Wildlife Deterrent. We have been using the model featuring a synthesized cougar hiss at random intervals at our new home bordering open space for several months now.

The first morning after moving our miniature goats into their new pens, we saw a coyote skirting the fenceline looking for a way in. It was not deterred by our presence and only retreated when we approached shooting a pellet gun. We set up the deterrent in a nearby tree that day. We have not seen or heard of another coyote since then.

All of our neighbors have stories about the aggressive coyotes spotted increasingly over the years, and even some sightings of bobcats. The whole neighborhood (on one acre properties) is grateful to us for the sound deterrent. So far, so good. It sure was alot less expensive than coyote rollers or electric fencing. I promise to post if we have any future encounters with predators, but for now we are sleeping soundly.


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RE: Wolf/coyote question

You have nothing to fear for your own safety from coyotes. I have chased them for fun after scaring one out of the brush by my pond.

PS People are not seeing packs of coydogs. They are just coyotes.


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