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Exotic Cats

Posted by struwwelpeter (My Page) on
Sat, Jul 18, 09 at 23:27

Does anyone have experience with the less surly cats in the 30 to 50 pound range, e.g., servals, caracals, Asian lynx, hybrids?

What are the greatest disadvantages compared to domestic cats? Are they more likely to spray, not use a litter box, chew furniture? Will any of them eat cat or dog food and, if so, which?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Exotic Cats

I don't know anything about "wild" pet cats but would think long and hard and check with breeders, make sure they are good breeders. Also, would the area you live in be ok to won such an animal?

If you want a large domestic cat I have a maine coon, very big and very lovable. There is another kind of large breed out there but can't remember the name, but I think pretty rare, I saw some once at a vet, they said they were pets but also used for blood donations because of their size, they were short haired and both orange tabbies, but very huge.

Here is a link that might be useful: maine coon


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RE: Exotic Cats

I have domestic cats in the seven to nine pound range, they are friendly and lovable and playful and have sharp enough claws and pointy enough teeth for me! And they land with a thud and, even though not encouraged, will roam on the kitchen-counters. They also keep my property free of mice, ground-squirrels and wood-rats.
Why do you want a larger feline? @ fifty pounds they would need to be restrained and caged, what's the point?


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RE: Exotic Cats

There is a breed of cat called the Savannah that is a cross between a domestic cat and the African Serval cat. You should search out some websites and read about their temperament. Cats with a high percentage of wild blood can be quite a challenge and are definitely not for everyone. Check out the breed of cat called a Bengal. Their dispositions are much more predictable but you still have the appearance of a wild cat.


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RE: Exotic Cats

I am already aware of the existence of Savannahs and Bengals.

I do not want speculation or vague generalities. I want to hear about observations from those with experience raising such cats.


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RE: Exotic Cats

Best check local laws about raising 'wild' cats---most places do not allow such without a license----and most areas are quite stingy with those licenses.

Wild animals are not good pets.


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RE: Exotic Cats

The poster wants personal experiences - not advice from people who think they have all the answers. He asked a question - he wants answers from people who have them.


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RE: Exotic Cats

Well, gee----I generally do not answer if I have little/no experience.

Keweping/raising 'wild'(generally classified by the local authorities) animals requires licenses, accomodations, and knowledge that is generallly outside the range of normal pet owners.

Most cases of circumvention of requirements by folks with less than appropriate knowlege of how to deal with 'wild' animals results in disasters.

A question such as the OP asked is prime evidence of said lack of knowlege.


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RE: Exotic Cats

I have a friend with a serval. It pees all over the cage. It's not something you can cuddle with. Even though it was not wild caught it's not interested in interaction with humans. It's just a cat in a big caged room in the basement that you can look at and feed and clean up after.


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RE: Exotic Cats

How sad for the Serval. :-(


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RE: Exotic Cats

These people are the experts, so you should read what they have to say.

Here is a link that might be useful: Big Cat Rescue


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RE: Exotic Cats

Best check local laws about raising 'wild' cats---most places do not allow such without a license----and most areas are quite stingy with those licenses.
Wild animals are not good pets.

Well, gee----I generally do not answer if I have little/no experience.
Keweping/raising 'wild'(generally classified by the local authorities) animals requires licenses, accomodations, and knowledge that is generallly outside the range of normal pet owners.

Most cases of circumvention of requirements by folks with less than appropriate knowlege of how to deal with 'wild' animals results in disasters.

A question such as the OP asked is prime evidence of said lack of knowlege.

Dear Mr. Presumptuous,

You are off topic because I never implied that I wanted a new pet cat. In fact, I am of such an age that I might likely die before a new pet cat would and I do not want to abandon a loved one. Also, I never asked about legalities which are properties of human culture and not properties of cats.

Here is a link that might be useful: Big Cat Rescue

Just as I suspected, on average, exotic cats spray more than domestic cats. What I find funny is "All wild cats, neutered or not, male or female, will spray bucket loads of urine all over everything they wish to claim as theirs (including you) because this is how nature has taught them to guard territory." because I have been sprayed by my now defunct female domestic cat. Apparently, many so called "cat experts" are unaware that there are two kinds of cat spray. The most common is urine. The other kind of spray comes from the anal glands like that of a skunk. That's what I got hit with. Smelled like burnt chicken but was more persistent. I wonder if anal spray is more prevalent in some exotic cat species?


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RE: Exotic Cats

Gee, you ask a question in the same format as quite a few people wanting information about adopting/finding/buying/raising animals and then get all snotty when someone answers truthfully.

It would have helped to explaion your reason for asking---you would get answers pertaining to what you specifically wanted to know---instead of general area questions.


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RE: Exotic Cats

I am an owner of a bobcat. Or I guess I might say he owns me. lol. It is very hard to explain to someone over the internet their behaviors and how they act. You always see pictures of cute exotic cats doing funny things or just laying on their owners laps. Yes, that stuff does happen. But seeing those pictures are not a realistic portrayal of what everyday life is with one of them. I always encourage people to volunteer at a wildcat sanctuary. There are a lot around. Get to know their behaviors first hand. Get hands on experience. Wildcats cannot eat dog food. They will die. Not immediately, but they need a complete raw diet just like they would eat in the wild. Most of the cats that have been brought to our sanctuary by their owners that are sick have beeen fed the wrong diet. Some have fed their exotics canned domestic cat food, or hard domestic dog food. Some have fed meat, but have cooked it. It HAS to be raw. As soon as you cook it, you take out every nutrient that your cat needs. It is messy to feed an exotic because they like to throw their food around. Ours eats outside in his enclosure. It is very important in my opinion to have an outdoor enclosure. They need that enrichment. If you have any questions feel free to email me. I am glad to answer any questions you may have. So many people get an exotic because they are so adorable as kittens, and then end up giving them up when they grow up because they do not know how to handle the biting, or the destroying of your house. Most exotic cat owners have to do extensive remodelling to their houses to accomodate their cat. You should have a double door entry at every entrance to your house to prevent escape. You will never catch an exotic cat that escapes. and that is very dangerous, to the cat and to others who may come in contact with it. An exotic cat is not really anything like living with a domestic cat. and there is no such thing as a bobcat hybrid cat. people claim this all the time, but there have only ever been two cases ever proven in history of a successful birth of bobcat hybrid kittens. the genetic makeup,....chromosomes are just too different for a pregnancy to occur. When raised with humans, exotics bond very strongly with them. they see you as their parent. They look to you for all their needs. But raising an exotic takes an experienced person. That is why I always recommend volunteering at a sanctuary or spending time with someone's exotic. they do bite. and an exotic bit hurts. They crush bones, since they eat bones in their diet, they have the ability to cause a lot of damage when they bite you, and at some point or several points in their lives you will most likely be bitten. Litterbox habits are different between exotics. Bobs are very good about using the liitter box, while some other exotics may not use them 100%. Any more questions, feel free to ask.


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