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Top 6 Ways to Kill Piper

Posted by silversword (My Page) on
Wed, May 27, 09 at 13:30

What would you do if your kid was one of the ones who made this video?

Top 6 Ways to Kill Piper

"A Pierce County mother says she's horrified by a cartoon video - posted online - that showed several ways to kill her sixth grade daughter. The cartoon was made off school grounds by some of her daughter's classmates, girls aged 11 and 12. Titled "Top Six Ways to Kill Piper," it includes depictions of girls shooting her, making her commit suicide, poisoning her and even pushing her off a cliff.

Beth Smith tells KING5-TV the cartoon was set to a Hannah Montana song called "True Friend" and posted on YouTube. Her daughter Piper attends Elk Plain School of Choice in Spanaway, Wash., as do the girls who made the video. The little girl says it hurt her feelings. Because of privacy rules, the Bethel School District says it can't say how the girls were disciplined. But district spokeswoman Krista Carlson tells KING the students involved "have expressed their remorse about this incident." A report was also filed with the sheriff's department."


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Top 6 Ways to Kill Piper

You already posted this on the Hot Topics Forum


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RE: Top 6 Ways to Kill Piper

I think this is a good topic for the parents forum as well. I don't normally look at the hot topics forum.

I don't know what I'd do if one of my kids helped make this video. I'm just aghast at the thought. Off the top of my head there would be an apology to Piper and her parents. I don't know if it would be practical to separate my daughter from the other girls who helped make the video (was it most of the other girls in the class, etc.). But if it was practical for the school I'd ask that my daughter not be in the same class as the other girls, or not sit by them in class. My daughter wouldn't be able to go to their homes or have them come to hers.

My daughter's online access would be monitored or shut off completely. Certainly we would be looking at some type of community service for kids who are different or in difficult circumstances. I'd also be asking for recommendations from the school counselor, because I just think I'd be at a total loss to know what on earth to do to address the situation.

I'd be talking to the school librarian to find books about kids whose lives were different or difficult, and my daughter would have required reading along with associated book discussions.

I'm assuming this little girl, Piper, was targeted because she was different, or annoying. If instead she was targeted because she was an incredibly mean bully who was making their lives miserable, then there would still be consequences like apologies, punishments, online access cut off or monitored, etc. But I would also be helping my daughter to realize how inappropriate it was to address the situation this way and we would be spending lots of time discussing better ways to handle bullies. I'd also look into whether or not the school had been alerted by my daughter or the other girls to the bullying and was attempting to handle it in a reasonable way. And I'd be looking at myself as a parent to figure out why my daughter hadn't told me she was being tormented to the point of frustration that she'd participate in making a video like that.

What a sad situation for all concerned.


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RE: Top 6 Ways to Kill Piper

If you don't want to respond Momj47 by all means ignore my duplicate posts. I thought this was pertinent to the parenting forum.

I'm personally astounded that bullying is taken into the cyber world to this degree. I was shocked at the MySpace issue a year or so ago, but this is a whole different approach. Inconceivable that something like this would occur but then again, I remember SLAM books when I was a kid.

Do you think that we are just more aware of bullying now, or is this a worse form of bullying than the teasing/pants-ing type of bullying that was done when we were children?


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RE: Top 6 Ways to Kill Piper

I would also suspend computer privileges except homework and access to the other girls. I would get to the bottom of the reasons with a counselor. I also think community service is a good consequence. If you hurt others, you need to help others. And a long, written, thought-out apology to Piper and family.

It's hard to imagine, but there are parents who find that behavior funny. They would be proud of their daughters for what they created, even how they targeted another girl. They might make a show of remorse to authority figures, but at home they are laughing and saying "They didn't do anything wrong. Can't she take a joke?"

Silversword, I wonder, too, what has changed and what is the same over the years. I thought about saying that I think it's worse with girls than it used to be. But as soon as it came to mind, I remembered my own experience in 6th grade being physically and emotionally bullied by a group of other girls. If they had the internet then... well, I cannot imagine what would have been posted about me for the world to read.

I think kids are smarter, as in less innocent, less naive. They say stuff about each other that I didn't know the meaning of when I was 12. They have the mature knowledge of young adults, but still the emotional sense of a child. It's like putting adult strength, power and weapons into the hands of children. They have more tools (words, knowledge, manipulation, and technology) than we had has children. They have adult privileges without adult responsibility or consequences, and no understanding of the harm they do.

I think I scared my 9 y/o DD straight the other day when I heard her call someone "retard." I loath that word. It is so ugly and mean and intolerant. I told her it was up there with the "B" word that is a bad word for women (she knew that one) and the "N" word that's a bad word for black people (she did not know that one, I just found that interesting that she had not heard about "the N word."). Anyway, we had a whole conversation about mean words meant to hurt people. She used it for a boy she just doesn't like, he annoys her. Still, it's ugly and doesn't represent the values I want her to have. We know a couple boys who are moderately autistic, learning disabled, and have been very nice to her. I told her to think about how those boys would feel if they heard her use that word. Even if she wasn't talking about them, knowing that she used that word ... a word mean people might say to them.. would hurt them. At almost 10, I think she is just around the corner from those mean-girl social experiences. I want her safely in the middle, not the bully or the victim, but willing to stand up for what's right.

I know sometimes when a child is being the bully the parent, like I would be, is shocked and horrified and wants to correct the thinking and behavior. But I'm afraid that the truth is more often the parents see nothing wrong with the thinking or the behavior. Happy kids do not behave that way.


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RE: Top 6 Ways to Kill Piper

Stephanie, I think you have a really good point. Several of them actually:

"I think kids are smarter, as in less innocent, less naive. They say stuff about each other that I didn't know the meaning of when I was 12. They have the mature knowledge of young adults, but still the emotional sense of a child. It's like putting adult strength, power and weapons into the hands of children. They have more tools (words, knowledge, manipulation, and technology) than we had has children. They have adult privileges without adult responsibility or consequences, and no understanding of the harm they do."

And...

"Happy kids do not behave that way."

When I was in Jr. High there was this one girl. She made my life a living you-know-what. And she was very popular, so had a lot of weight to throw around. She left at the end of 8th grade... didn't graduate with us. A couple of years later I found out from some people in her neighborhood that the dad didn't feed them, and that she and her siblings would break into homes, eat food, and leave.

............. I picked my little 15 year old jaw up off the floor and stopped taking her bullying personally. Of course she hated me. I represented what she didn't have in her home life/with her family. I think of her with compassion now. She was just acting out her feelings for her situation that she had no control over and trying to feel power where she could.


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