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Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding through??

Posted by scerrir (My Page) on
Fri, Dec 6, 13 at 8:58

Hi there!!

I am putting 1x5 knotty pine boards, installed vertically in my bathroom. I would have liked to get clear pine, but the price was nearly tripled! So needless to say I chose the knotty pine.

I want to ensure the knots do not bleed through, as I am painting them all white.

Does anyone have any idea on how to ensure that none of the knots bleed through? I think it looks terrible when they bleed into white paint!

Thanks so much!

Rhea


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

BIN is the best primer to use for knot bleed. The stains may come back in several months time though.


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Hi paintguy!

So the stains are guaranteed to come back in only a few months? I was hoping they wouldn't surface for years!

So nothing on the market can seal them completely?

Thanks so much!!

Rhea


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Hi paintguy!

So the stains are guaranteed to come back in only a few months? I was hoping they wouldn't surface for years!

So nothing on the market can seal them completely?

Thanks so much!!

Rhea


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Shellac will seal the knotty pine.


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Hi Geoffrey_B,

Will shellac seal it forever, or will the knots bleed through eventually?

Is shellac different from the BIN primer?

I am really trying to consider if I should just buy clear pine for the planks - but they cost SO much more money!

Thanks,

Rhea


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Hi Geoffrey_B,

Will shellac seal it forever, or will the knots bleed through eventually?

Is shellac different from the BIN primer?

I am really trying to consider if I should just buy clear pine for the planks - but they cost SO much more money!

Thanks,

Rhea


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

BIN is a shellac primer. I'm not saying anything is guaranteed. Your knots may never bleed through again. About 10 years ago, I installed some cheap pine in a room in my house because I also did not want to pay for the clear pine. I primed with water based primer then spot primed the knots with BIN then painted with my finish coat. About a year later I noticed some of the knots bled back through so I hit them again with the BIN and then touched up with the finish paint. Not all of the knots bled, just a handful of the bigger ones. Since then, the bleeding has not returned. That's what happened to me. Your experiences may be different.


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Hi paintguy!

Thank you so much for your replies - they are extremely helpful.

So for the ones that bled back through - would I then have to spot prime and paint the whole wall again? Because painting over just the 1 or 2 knots would show the difference in shades? Or did you not find that.

So there is hope for the BIN then? :) The clear pine quote I am getting is triple the cost of the regular knotty and I am not sure if I can bite that bullet, being first-time homebuyers!!

Rhea


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

"Will shellac seal it forever, or will the knots bleed through eventually?"

Forever is pretty long :)

Yes BIN is shellac - mixed with some (probably titanium oxide pigment) and some other 'stuff'.

I like straight shellac - nondiluted.

One thing about BIN they have introduced several types - be sure to get the BIN shellac primer. Don't get a waterbased primer.


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Hi Geoffrey_B!

Thank you so much for your reply again!!

I realize after I read my response that "forever" did sound funny. I just want to make sure it lasts more than a few months. I am hoping for years...

If I use Shellac straight - will this last "years"?

I just really want to use the planks in my bathroom but am on a very tight budget!!

If I use straight shellac, do I spot shellac the knots only? And then prime, and then paint??

Thank you so much!

Rhea :)


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

If you are an a very tight budget - shellac is probably the least expensive.

You only need 'hit' the knots.

However, you say "a tight budget", Then you say "forever". You understand that this requirement is impossible.

I give you the best, experienced advice.


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

If you are an a very tight budget - shellac is probably the least expensive.

You only need 'hit' the knots.

However, you say "a tight budget", Then you say "forever". You understand that this requirement is impossible.

I give you the best, experienced advice.


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

I am realizing it's impossible :)

I think I like the idea of trying shellac straight on the knots.
Then do I just use any primer and paint?

How many coats of shellac do you need to use to seal the knots?

I very much appreciate your experienced advice! You are making it a possibility for me to have the planks (that I can afford) in my bathroom, so thank you very much :)

Rhea


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

You have gotten good advice from PaintGuy, and myself.

Go with either advice. Stop worrying... you are doing the best you can do!

Focus on the positive. Don't worry about next year. Maybe the 'killer' asteriod will strike :)


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

I've painted many a problem areas with BIN shellac. (Paneling, knotty pine, major tobacco stains in a bar.)

On knotty pine, I spot-prime, making sure to dab shellac into the deep knots. (Does that make sense? Am I explaining this correctly?)

I then typically do two coats of the BIN. A gallon goes a long way, and I honestly think in my opinion, do I want to do this again? Better safe than sorry. A gallon runs about $25-$30 around here.

Since I've been using BIN, 5 years now, I haven't had to re-prime anything. Even the 50 year old knotty pine that was stained by years of heavy smoking by patrons. It was never sealed!

Just a little warning: If you have any allergies, sensitivities, wear a good OSHA mask, not a paper one. The denatured alcohol smell it gives off is not pleasant in a small space. It dissipates quickly (and the shellac dries in 1/2 hour to an hour), but in the meantime...

It is thin...put rosin paper or plastic on the floors if they need protecting, and mask the wood work and fixtures. Better to be safe than sorry. (I can always get paint off of myself, but other things are a whole different matter!)

Take some practice strokes with your roller or brush, as it might run and you want to familiarize yourself with the consistency. And don't use a foam brush...It will "eat" it.

You're got this. :) B-bye knotty pine!

I apologize for being so wordy!


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Hi happy_grrl!!!!!

You have no idea how helpful that was!! It was perfect - thank you so much for taking the time to respond :)

A few more questions for you...

- Do you dab the deep knots with straight shellac? Or the BIN product?

- If I do 2 coats of the BIN over the planks (after doing the spot dabbing), can I still paint over it? I want to paint them white.

- Should I spot dab and then prime both sides of the planks, or just the side that will face out? (I am not sure if the resin from the knots will bleed from the back to the front?)

Thank you so much again!! I was really looking into getting the clear pine over the weekend but it costs so much more, so this has made me feel better about getting the knotty pine! :)

Rhea


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

BIN is a shellac, with some titanium oxide added. (I'm not looking at a can right now, so I'm not sure if that's the only ingredient, so you probably shouldn't quote me!) lol It's a grayish-yellow white. You're going to want paint it.

If I have to dab a knot, I use a crappy brush (Like a $1-2 brush, because you're going to ruin it by pushing it in those crevices.)

Just do the side you're going to paint. I haven't ever had it bleed through a dab & 2 coats. I've used it on cedar, and that will bleed like no tomorrow. (Don't ask me why I had to paint beautiful cedar, I just do what I'm told. lol)

You can paint right over it. BIN is great for problem areas...I've used it on Formica (in bathrooms, it makes a slick surface matte, so paint will adhere.) It will make that knotty pine really easy to paint. It won't suck in as if you were painting it straight on. If I remember correctly, it even made painting those horrible connecting grooves easier, kinda filled them so the paint didn't sink into oblivion.

I know it sounds like a pain...But I always do two coats on a ceiling. Believe it or not, they take more of a beating than you think. When I worked in a paint store, I can't tell you how many times customers would come back and say the paint failed, it came off with a simple washing, it scratched off, etc. When prompted, I would find 9 out of 10 times they only did one coat with maybe some 2nd spot painting. You're bound to have water spotting and condensation in a bathroom, and if you have box elder bugs like we do here, or children, you might want to scrub it someday.

Paint 2 good coats, with at the very least 2 hours of dry time in between. You've got the paint out, you might as well do it. I know, you're probably grumbling. I hate painting ceilings too! But at least it's not popcorn!

And again, I'm really wordy. I hope it helps though.

One other thing...BIN cleans up with acetone. If you get it on your hands, and you don't have acetone, nail polish remover usually works. I usually just toss my brush, unless it's one of my $10 ones.

Happy Painting!


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Wow, your replies are insanely helpful!!!!!!

More questions...if you can believe it ;)

- That was one of my concerns of whether or not I should prime and paint IN the grooves for the t&g? Do you have to paint in between them?

- So I should first spot dab ALL knots with the BIN. Then paint 2 full coats on front and back of the boards with the BIN. Then paint 2 coats of the white paint on top, leaving 2 hours in between?

(The BIN only needs 30 min in between because it dries fast?)

- For painting with the BIN, is it okay to do it in a garage?

Thanks so much! I am excited now :)

Rhea


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RE: Painting knotty-pine...how to stop knots from bleeding throug

Ok...Prime just the side that will be visible. Also do the ends and any joints. You don't have to do the backside unless it's going outside.

If you are planning on doing this pre-installation, only do the first coat of paint. Save the second for after install, that way you can cover up nail holes and make it look really nice.

If it's going to be a day or two for install, clean out your paint tray. Wrap your brush in plastic wrap or a plastic bag. (Shopping sacks work well.) Do the same with your roller, handle and all. Then put both in a garbage bag and wrap it up tight. They'll stay wet and usable at least a week. You can also put them in the fridge, but I never have room, so I don't.

The Bin dries super fast. (I really love that!) I would bet by the time you get done priming, you can turn around and start your first coat of paint!

You can do it in the garage, just make sure it's at least 52 degrees F. Anything less than that compromises dry time and adhesion. You can do your first coat of paint in the garage too, as long as it's warm enough.

You're very welcome. :)


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