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Plaster walls

Posted by Eliz123 (My Page) on
Sun, May 27, 12 at 21:06

We are remodeling a frame house built in 1952 with plaster walls. While vacant, vandals spray painted graffiti on some walls. (Of course they never use pastels...lol, black and red mainly) Some of the walls also have hairline cracks.
How do we repair this damage and what paint do we use?
Thank you for your help.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Plaster walls

To cover the graffiti, use "KILZ Original" primer. It reeks, but it's a 1-coat sealer and leaves a nice flat white to paint over.

Hairline cracks are a fact of life with plaster. (she says, scanning the 1890s plastered adobe walls)

If they are truly hairline, ignore them. If they are wider than a credit card (as a convenient measuring tool) a swipe with a flexible, paintable caulk should fill the gap. Then paint over it with your primer.

1 - first the cracks
2 - then the graffitti
3 - then the finish paint


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RE: Plaster walls

Most are credit card size or smaller...some are larger, after filling them how do you match the texture? Can you paint latex over the original Kilz, or does that take the newer latex Kilz (not as good?) The walls are oil based paint now.
Thank you for your advice.


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RE: Plaster walls

Can you paint latex over the original Kilz,

Yes, skip any other Kilz product, the original will stick to the oil paint( and anything else) providing a base you can put either oil or latex back over it. Have a GOOD respirator, window fans etc, it is one of the most vile odors out there.


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RE: Plaster walls

If you are filling a wide crack, use patching plaster, and whatever it takes to match the texture. Thin ones need a flexible patching compound (flexible spackle)

You probably have a bit of an "orange peel" effect from multiple coats of paint. The easiest way to blend those in
is to spread a small amount of spackle (not the patching plster) thinly on a kitchen sponge, then pat it on over the patch and fade it out into the surrounding few inches. when it's dry, sand very lightly and you should have it.

Practice in the closets.


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RE: Plaster walls

You probably have a bit of an "orange peel" effect from multiple coats of paint. The easiest way to blend those in
is to spread a small amount of spackle (not the patching plster) thinly on a kitchen sponge, then pat it on over the patch and fade it out into the surrounding few inches. when it's dry, sand very lightly and you should have it.

cool, I never heard that trick


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