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Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

Posted by janesylvia (My Page) on
Mon, Feb 24, 14 at 16:09

My contractor spot primed some area, and then did two coats for my 4 rooms already. They all look pretty good.

Now I tried sample BM ocean air in another room. The color on unprimed area (original color: off white) is light blue, but on primed area is greenish blue, quite different. What should we do?

Thank you very much.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

If the area is painted, it is sealed, but by older paint.

Try two coats on both the painted and primed area and compare.

Are you using self priming paint?


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

Thank you very much, brushworks.

I tried two coats, but they still look obviously different, one is light blue, another is greenish blue.

I bought the samples, so I don't think they are self priming paint.


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

I wonder if your comparing 2 different walls and light is a factor maybe, or issue with 2 different sample shades. It's all I could think of. I think if you just put 2 coats of finish on all the walls you'll be ok.

I'm a pro paper hanger and painter.


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

Thank you very much, zep516. I am comparing the same sample on the same wall, one on unprimed wall, another on primed wall which is right next to it. I tried two coats, and they are still different. I don't know if the real color would be light blue or greenish blue if two coats are painted on all the walls. Is it necessary to prime all the walls in that room?


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

Is it necessary to prime all the walls in that room?

Now it is, yes. You are going to have to prime over all the samples you put on and prime the entire wall to make everything even out


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

Thank you very much for your help, Chris.


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

If you're going to prime all the walls as Chris suggested, you may consider having the primer tinted close to the "BM ocean air" color, as opposed to priming everything white.

Joe


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

For most deeptone-to-light colors, tinting primer is totally unnecessary.
* If you're "benefiting" from tinted priming with such colors...the paint is going on WAAAAAAAYYY too thin!!!
* I can understand it if only ONE coat of paint can be applied for cost reasons, etc......but even then....

Faron


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

Use Aura, two coats.


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

Thank you very much for all your help.


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

janesylvia, I found that the color surrounding the pint sample made a huge difference in the perception of the color. I painted cream-colored samples (BM Putnam Ivory) in 3 areas of my kitchen/dining room. The existing walls were goldish. In all three spots, in any light, the samples looked gray.

So I got a sample of a different cream color. I painted two different areas in the kitchen and dining room, and painted around the first sample on a short wall, covering the yellow. Once the yellow was gone, the Putnam Ivory looked completely different (and beautiful). I ended up using it, and it doesn't look gray at all.

So my guess is that there is a difference either in background color, adjacent color, or light that is making your samples look different. And I second brushworks' suggestion of Aura - it's wonderful!


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RE: Color looks different on spot primed area and unprimed area.

you discovered why color selection is so time- and space-specific.

You'll get the best end result if you prime your whole room grey before looking at color samples (you'll probably need to prime the room, anyway, right ?) That way no other significant color influencers will be present in the room.

Light, surrounding colors, bounced colors, all affect the way our eyes/brain perceives color. The science of color is something most people dismiss but it works for��"or against��"you every time. I never select a color based on what I "like" but rather based on what goal I have for the space (high energy, seductive, calming, impressive) lighting, space and the adjacent colors/textures/surfaces.

I giggle to myself (and sometimes out loud) when I see people in big box stores holding samples at arms length on a weekend morning to choose a color that will enrobe their room before the sun sets that evening. Then they complain that something was wrong with the color/paint/walls, etc. rather than look at the how and why of color science and their insufficient color selection process.


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