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Bowed leaded glass

Posted by Kiagrace (My Page) on
Sat, Nov 17, 12 at 20:30

The southern exposure leaded glass in our 1910 home is bowing inward pretty noticeably. Of course people who don't are about old houses tell me to just replace the windows with new, but the idea makes me cringe. Has anyone dealt with this issue? What are my options? If I just leave it, do I need to worry about it breaking? Where would I even try to find someone to fix it and would it cost more than my annual salary? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. :)


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Bowed leaded glass

Look at the link below...go to the structural deterioration near the bottom...there is an exact description for your problem. Good Luck !

Here is a link that might be useful: structural deterioration


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

You can find a stained glass studio or maker in the yellow pages, most cities have them. You can also try the local university--their art departments often have classes in it, and may even take on your window as a project for students.


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

We took our 2 bowing windows to be repaired by one of the two leaded window shops near us and they are as good as new now.

The repairs consisted of releading the intersections of all leading. Ours are hinged windows so It was a no brainer to remove and reinstall them.

we consider this to be one of the wisest money spends we've had with our home.


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

" releading the intersections of all leading"

Do you mean re-soldering?

Bowing is also a sign that inadequate stiffening bars are present.


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

Re soldering is right because lead can't be used. POor wood choice on my part.


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

You need to have support bars installed and wired to the leaded bits.

It's a very common repair.


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

"lead can't be used"

On what planet?


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

Brickeye, why don't you just go ahead and tell the OP all they need to know. I had stained glass windows fixed at a specialty shop and I don't have perfect terminology to describe the work done. You clearly have an axe to grind. Grind away.

Kia. Your windows can be fixed by a specialist.


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

"You clearly have an axe to grind"

they why would you even try to offer incorrect advice to others (repeatedly)?

Do you offer advice on surgical procedures you have received?

I told them exactly what was needed.

Re-solder the joints and add the strength members that had ben omitted.

And yes, many soft solders contain lead, or can even be pure lead (though 60% lead and 40% tin has some working advantages).

Lead solder is not allowed in plumbing for water supply lines.


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

You tell 'em Brickeyee! Your advice is always sound, and your posts are ones I look for on questions I have. When trying to help posters, it is important that the right terms are used so they can know what to do--'releading' leaded intersections confused me for a second, and I have read extensively on glass and tried it myself. If you don't know the terms to look for in an internet search, you are seriously screwed.

jm, it seems you have the axe to grind--or wouild that be sharpen? We appreciate that you posted the option you chose for your windows...but the attack on a respected member of the community was not helpful. Brick was trying to clarify for the OP and others who read this forum so that helpful advice would be gleaned...a simple statement of 'I didn't know the proper terms' would have been sufficient.


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

Thanks all for the advice. I believe there is a well respected lead glass place the next town over. I will give them a call. I assume that since they've made it 100 years they might make it through one more winter? It's getting a little cold now... I assume I will need to figure out how to take them out to bring them to someone to be fixed?


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

The easiest and safest way is to remove them with the sashes...don't try to remove the glass from its wood frame. Trying that yourself with the bowing could cause the whole thing to fall apart.

When you do take them out, just to be safe, maybe put some painter's tape across them in several directions to help stabilize them?


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RE: Bowed leaded glass

Great idea. I'll remember the painter's tape. :)


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