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And you thought *your* kitchen was tiny...

Posted by rosemaryt (My Page) on
Sat, Nov 28, 09 at 10:07

Found this in a 1925 architectural magazine. And yes, that's a fridge under the drain board.

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And can you say "L I A B I L I T Y"? Look at this tub!!! One false move and it's over. Yikes.

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Here is a link that might be useful: A lawsuit waiting to happen


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: And you thought *your* kitchen was tiny...

Great kitchen and water hazard stories and photos!

But we've gone lots more compact since then.

Here is a link that might be useful: Compact Kitchens


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RE: And you thought *your* kitchen was tiny...

Thanks for my laugh of the day. I especially got goosebumps at the last picture. Cooking elements are 220 Volt. ohhhhhhh


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RE: And you thought *your* kitchen was tiny...

I swear to you that last "kitchen" is exactly like the one I had in our apt in West Germany in 1984 when my DH and I lived there. I used that kitchen for a year and even cooked our 1st Thanksgiving with it (gave a 7lb turkey CPR to break its ribs and stuffed it in a toaster oven for hours!)

Always ;-)
Hunzi


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RE: And you thought *your* kitchen was tiny...

LOLOL. I know how that goes. I've cooked in similar kitchens in the U.K. and France. The one in France, however, was ancient and the fixtures larger. Big, cast-iron farm sink. Not a counter or cabinet in the whole room. You supplied your own. The one in England, my kid's kitchen was sort of like an American kitchen, only everything was in miniature, including the baking tins. You manage, and you turn out some good food.

The real fun was my folks' kitchen in Japan. We did not have a modern hot water heater. Every morning a fellow they contracted to tend it came in and started a charcoal fire under it. You planned your baths carefully. Very carefully.


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RE: And you thought *your* kitchen was tiny...

Cooking elements are 220 Volt.

According to the specs, they are 115 volt.

In any case, 50 milliamperes is enough to cause fibrilation and death.

A GFCI is a must.


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RE: And you thought *your* kitchen was tiny...

That surprises me. 115 isn't typical, but would make a unit like that more versatile as far as installations. It would be like cooking on a hotplate. come to think of it.


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