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Roofing Issues

Posted by tgaito78 (My Page) on
Thu, Sep 12, 13 at 11:41

Hello all, new to site, new to an old house...

Home was build roughly around 1850 in New England.

My project started with getting a fireplace insert in an older fireplace. Was told to get a mason because the chimney needed to be rebuilt from the roofline up.

Mason wanted a roofer to verify that he would be able to work on the roof with his staging/materials/workers, etc.

Now, roofing company comes in and claims that my roof is hazardous due to spans between joists, some bowing of the span, etc. I'm told the whole roof needs to come down, a new one be installed, and a support beam from the basement all the way to the roofline.

I have some termite damaged on a few of the exterior roof boards which was sistered by a previous owner, as well as the peak joist (sorry, don't know the technical name) was sistered.

There is also a metal tie rod connected to a roof joist and to a joist of the floor. According the roofing guy they did this so that snow weight wouldn't push the roof out of the house. Additionally there is a support column (hollow) from the roof peak to the floor too.

The roofing guy says both should be temporary fixes, not permanent solutions. Also said that if I brought in the local AHJ they would probably evict me and my family for a hazard.

I'm concerned that #1 I got my self a lemon roof and didn't dig deep enough @ the sale, #2 it should be taken seriously and I'm going to need a new roof whether I want it or not, #3 these guys are looking at this as an opportunity to scare the *&^% out of me and make some money when it might not be so dire.

Funny thing is this started as a favor from the roofing company who is in a networking group with the mason and fireplace installer.

I can provide pics or measurements if needed, I'm just at a point where I need a sounding board.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Roofing Issues

You need to find yourself a structural engineer who is OUTSIDE any networking group to do an independent evaluation. That is the only way to determine what your next step should be.


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RE: Roofing Issues

In addition, I'd get a termite inspection.

(Around here, many exterminators do it for free assuming they will get the exterminating job if they find them.)

Repairs using termite damaged wood show the level of interest and expertise of the PO.


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RE: Roofing Issues

Duplicate

This post was edited by worthy on Sat, Sep 14, 13 at 20:19


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RE: Roofing Issues

I wouldn't rely on any of these self-serving opinions including that of a building inspector. Hiring a design professional to tell these guys what needs to be done could save you money and aggravation.


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RE: Roofing Issues

Thanks for the quick feedback. Good idea on the termite inspection, I have someone coming tomorrow.

I'm planning on reaching out to a few other builders I know to look @ the roof, at least see if they say the same thing or something totally different.


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