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Another 'What style is this'

Posted by bldn10 (My Page) on
Sun, Jul 29, 12 at 16:17

I have bought and am renovating this circa 1920 house in Memphis for resale. The wing to the right in the photo is a '50s or '60s den addition that I am making into a master suit. The gables and upper sashes look Craftsman but that round door and no porch bring Medieval English or European to my mind. Inside there are Craftsman style bookcases flanking the faux stone FP, and 1 uncased arch between the LR and DR. The shutters are obviously unoriginal.

I have been thinking about turning it into a variation of a rambling French or Italian country house. Or I could just go Craftsman all the way.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Another 'What style is this'

I'm not good at knowing & determining styles.. but I love your house! It has a lot of charm.... good luck!


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RE: Another 'What style is this'

Those half-hip dormers and gables are often used in English Cottage style. This is a wonderful interpretation of that style, with Craftsman touches.


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RE: Another 'What style is this'

Sometimes the half-hips are called jerkinheads. More romantic-sounding!


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RE: Another 'What style is this'

Also called clipped gables.

Your house is not Craftsman. The 1920s was the Romantic Revival era--Colonial Revival, Tudor Revival, and, as exemplified by your cute house, English Cottage Revival, called English Colonial where I am.

1920s houses that came from kits or purchased plans used a lot of leftover Craftsman influences and construction techniques because these were the default techniques of the previous decade or so. That doesn't make your house a Craftsman, any more than a colonial built today is Modernist because it reflects some Modern ideas, such as large stretches of window or vaulted space.

I am always mystified why someone would want to destroy an excellent example of a charming style to turn it into something else that it isn't, rather than simply purchasing something else to begin with.


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RE: Another 'What style is this'

"I am always mystified why someone would want to destroy an excellent example of a charming style to turn it into something else that it isn't, rather than simply purchasing something else to begin with."

Is this directed at me? Obviously I care about the style or I wouldn't be here asking about it! The round door certainly suggested English to me but my research has not found any English cottages w/ such low pitched roofs. The walls are stucco so that w/ the round door led me in a more Mediteranean direction. The house is not an "excellent" example of an English cottage because of the roof, Crafstman details, and lack of obvious English characteristics such as leaded diamond-pane windows. So it is a tweenie, if you will, and can go either way. Frankly, Craftsman - been there, done that - I prefer a country cottage look, whether it be English or Continental.

So, thank you all for confirming the non-Crafstman direction.


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RE: Another 'What style is this'

bldn,
Look up "shingle style" for some examples -- it's too late really, shingle was late 1800's, but it sure looks shingle-esque to me, and perhaps the architect was nostalgic? Those half-hip/clipped/jerkin roofs are great.

Congrats on a lovely purchase.

Here is a link that might be useful: shingle style


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RE: Another 'What style is this'

"roof, Crafstman details, and lack of obvious English characteristics such as leaded diamond-pane windows"

All typical of English Cottage Revival styles. Not every builder wanted to invest in the latest detail like the diamond panes. I have seen many, many examples of houses with your details around here. You can find original house plans and advertisements online.

The three brick corbels over your fireplace scream 1920s. Very common around here. Some houses veer more A&C and some more Deco, depending on when and where the houses were built.

A&C is wonderful but way, way overdone. Some people think A&C is the only old house style there was.

Your house may originally have been decorated something like this, although that's a far more "pure" or maybe extreme example of the house style.

In my home search, I saw houses like yours decorated in a less theme-y way, but with plenty of comfortable, eclectic antiques in traditional English Country style. They all looked great.


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RE: Another 'What style is this'

How radical are the changes you're thinking of making? I wouldn't remove any of the original detailing -- it is honest to the spirit of the home. You're doing this for resale; while you may be tired of Craftsman, that doesn't mean your buyers are. Which is not to say that the master suite should be full-on Stickley, but the charming blend of English cottage/A&C in the older part of the home is very attractive.

I'm taking a guess here: East Memphis? Somewhere along the Walnut Grove corridor?


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