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floor jack rating

Posted by k9mom (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 7, 11 at 13:27

Hi,
I have an old dutch colonial, built in 1909. Doing a ceramic tile job in the kitchen. Between the kitchen and the rooms to the east of it is a double floor joist. I do NOT want to try to level the floor with a jack but just support it, as the (big) refrigerator sits on the east wall of the kitchen, and on the other side of that wall is a toilet. That side of the floor leans a decent amount and my tile installers are going to do some leveling. I just want to put a floor jack under the joist to keep it from sagging any more years from now. Is there a certain lb# rating I need to buy? Basement has old concrete floor, but concrete would not be deep to support weight if I were to choose to start upping the jack(which I'm not). Should I get a piece of steel to put under the jack?
thanks


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: floor jack rating

For permanent installation, you need an adjustable column that is rated accordingly. As well, depending on the load and the condition of the concrete it's sitting on, you may have to pour a pier under the column.

Here is a link that might be useful: Adjustable Steel Columns


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RE: floor jack rating

Be warned that the common columns are more of a kit than a finished column.

The threaded collar holding the screw portion needs to be welded in place as do the cross pins for setting the height.

It is in the listing for use of the columns.

For temporary use the only welding I do is to the screw, and better top and bottom plates to spread the load (on on the screw column top, one on the bottom of the column).

The thin sheet metal supplied is not very adequate.


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RE: floor jack rating

If you don't bury the adjustable portion of the column in concrete, it's advisable to weld support plating on both sides of the columns up to the top plate. At least, that's what my engineer had me do when they were installed with the adjustable screw at the top.

And if the bottom plate is not buried in concrete, it should be fastened to the floor with four expanding concrete anchors.


House Under Renovation Collapses
Source: CTV News

(I feel like such a schoolmarm, reciting these bits of advice. After all, when I was a real estate agent I saw many homes propped up by all manner of jerry rigged supports and they hadn't fallen down. But some do.)

"
Shanghai Surprise


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RE: floor jack rating

If you don't bury the adjustable portion of the column in concrete, it's advisable to weld support plating on both sides of the columns up to the top plate. At least, that's what my engineer had me do when they were installed with the adjustable screw at the top.

And if the bottom plate is not buried in concrete, it should be fastened to the floor with four expanding concrete anchors.


House Under Renovation Collapses
Source: CTV News

(I feel like such a schoolmarm, reciting these bits of advice. After all, when I was a real estate agent I saw many homes propped up by all manner of jerry rigged supports and they hadn't fallen down. But some do.)

"
Shanghai Surprise


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RE: floor jack rating

"If you don't bury the adjustable portion of the column in concrete, it's advisable to weld support plating on both sides of the columns up to the top plate. At least, that's what my engineer had me do when they were installed with the adjustable screw at the top. "

Overkill unless you are using the column beyond its manufacturer's rating.

Burying it in concrete is not advised either.

They are steel columns with just a thin coat of primer.
Foundation concrete is wet by definition, and the salts in the concrete will eat the thin steel quickly (from the inside and outside).


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RE: floor jack rating

Burying it in concrete is not advised either.

"Steel in concrete is usually in a noncorroding, passive condition. However, steel-reinforced concrete is often used in severe environments where sea water or deicing salts are present. When chloride moves into the concrete, it disrupts the passive layer protecting the steel, causing it to rust and pit." (emphasis added)National Ready Mix Concrete Association

Problems arising from placing steel in roadways and elevated parking structures has been recognised in Ontario from at least the 1970s. Indeed, steel void forms were banned in road overpasses in the mid '70s. I was commissioned by Stelco to write about the advantages of using steel void forms but instead reported back to them that the Province was set to ban them. No story. No kill fee either for this messenger!

Steel rebar is, of course, used extensively in home concrete foundations, floors and footings. High salt conditions--on roads, bridges and structures subject to road de-icing and ocean water--require other approaches to protecting the rebar and concrete.

Here is a link that might be useful: National Ready Mix Concrete Association: Concrete in Practice


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RE: floor jack rating

"Steel in concrete is usually in a noncorroding, passive condition."

They are just wrong, and trying to sell concrete.

Even re-bar for highways is now routinely epoxy coated.

Exterior or below grade concrete is always wet and eats steel up very nicely.

Luckily for the most part residential concrete is much stronger than needed, and the steel is only for crack control, not actual strength.

A steel column in a basement is a different application.

I have replaced many of them that are 20-30 years old with the bottom of the column reduced to rust, with a number of them buckling.


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permanent adjustable columns

hi
i just bought a 30 year old house , in the basement their is a permanent adjustable column supporting a beam while the end of the column is resting on a screw which is buried in basement floor. i am just concerned if something happns to that scre the whole house will collapse, as the column starts some 3 inches above the ground . should i fill the empth space around the scre with quick setting cement to protect it from rust and giving some additional support to column or just use silicone to cover the empty spaces or just spary paint it with rust checking spray

thanks


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RE: floor jack rating

If you start a new thread you might get some answers.


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