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DIY copper countertop #2

Posted by cleanclassic (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 23, 09 at 23:20

Since the last thread on this topic has reached capacity, let's continue it with a new one.

Here is the prior thread 'DIY copper countertop'

I love the DIY work and photos that everyone has done. We are considering DIY Stainless Counters using similar copper methods used in the original post.

Does anyone know if this can be done with stainless sheets? I can't believe the cost of metal counters is more than marble or granite.

Here is a link that might be useful: DIY copper countertop


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

HI - JUST LOVED ALL THE PICS FROM ALICE AND EVERYONE - WANTING TO COVER MY LAMINATE SURFACES WITH COPPER SHEETING - DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY INFOR ON PLACES THAT MIGHT HELP IN UK AS I HAVE NOT BEEN ABLE TO FIND ANYONE HERE THAT REALLY KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT USING COPPER AS WORK TOPS?
THANKYOU


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

I was just curious how people are liking their counter tops now. My wife would love to do this, but I thought it would be expensive; price of copper and all...how are they holding up. Does the heat from the stove or oven influences the patina?

Circuspeanut, I was wondering how the joint at the "L" looks now? We have an "L" and would have to seam it in much the same way.

Lastly, how do you patina the copper if you want to patina it yourself. The wife and I saw a cool copper counter at a winery in AZ. They used acid and a torch then lacquered it to protect the patina.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

"We are considering DIY Stainless Counters using similar copper methods used in the original post.
Does anyone know if this can be done with stainless sheets?"
Stainless- which comprise a host of alloys- is invariably of much higher yield than copper, which means harder to work. It also work hardens faster, any bends made need to be done once- re-doing at a home shop level would be difficult at best.
It would be better to have any L-shapes accomplished by shearing/sawing/notching VS. joining themally (welding or silver soldering)as oxidation will require polishing and may involve flattening. Autogenous TIG welding is the commercial standard for the work.
Seams made with sheared edges (read:"factory")...if joined with epoxies/adhesives as in the referenced thread, will exhibit a thick glue line due to slight deformation at the edge. Care could be taken to have the burr side up but would require abrasive dressing which could compromise surface finish. A brushed surface would be easiest to blend into, as well as maintain.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

HI,
After following all of your wonderfull work for sometime now, I am ready to begin putting copper backsplashes in my newly renovated kitchen. However, I have a few questions/points for clarification before I begin :)

In regard to putting in the backspashes, is it best to put up the 1/4 inch plywood first - that is attach it to the wall with counter sinked screw and then fill in the screw holes and then, finally, put the copper on with the TC_20?
OR
Attach the copper to the plywood and then in some manner attach the coppered plywood to the wall???

As trim I plan on using very thin (1/4 inch)by 1 1/2 inch wide stainless steel bars. My question here is, how best to attach the stainless steel bars to the copper??

Aside from some paint this is the last phase of the project and I very ready to be done!


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Hi a_collie_garden,

I haven't done this yet, so I'm no expert but it sounds like the first option you listed is the best. If you did attached the copper first, then you make have a hard time attaching it to the wall.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Hi everyone. I must say, I learned a lot from some of the posts here and decided to take another route for doing my copper kitchen.
After reading the long copper counter post on this forum, I concluded that did not have the skills to do my own copper counter with a patina copper look. I didn't want to mess with chemical stuff (health reasons). After much googling, I found a company that sells pre patina copper sheets.
I was pretty much blown away when I saw some of their copper as I have never seen anything.

Here is a link that might be useful: Pre patina copper sheets

I decided to do my backsplash first since it would be easier for my first project. I purchased several sheets of their azul copper to give me a tropical feel. I had a local handyman help do the install. He used contact cement to adhere the copper to wall. I am so happy with the way it turned out. Most people that see it are amazed at the look of the copper because the golds/browns really pop out at you. My next step is to redo my cabinets with copper as they are very plain. I also am going to do a small kitchen counter in the upstairs guest area in an orange patina.

My next project is to do a copper countertop using pre patina copper sheets. I might go with orange this time. I'm get a discount this time since I let them use my photos for their website (my moment of fame, LOL!).


You can see my cabinets are very plain but the copper looks great with my current countertops.



I had the switch plates covered in a thinner copper so they would blend in easier.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

can anyone list the name of the supplier who has the wide copper sheets (4 feet by 10 feet). I am unable to locate them. Thank you!


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Hi historichouse,
I got my 4x10 sheet from ThyssenKrupp. Their website is www.copperandbrass.com. They were a bit of a pain to work with, but the copper shipped directly to my house in tact. It shipped Yellow Freight, but was packaged in a 400 pound crate (the crate was so big because it was laying flat). I was by myself, luckily the Yellow Freight driver was incredibly helpful.
Hope this helps!!!!
BTW, we still LOVE our copper counters.


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Report from the Field

Well, it's been almost 2 years since I first installed my DIY counters (July 2008). I had promised some photos of it after some time had passed, so here you go. We also still ADORE our counters; they just keep getting better with age.

As you can tell from the following shots, it is extremely difficult to catch the depth and richness of the copper in a photograph; it looks a different color in each picture (!). But they will give you the general idea.

Copper is a living finish; this means that it changes daily depending on whatever you set on it. This is not a countertop for folks who like polished granite, fussy glossy baroque cabinet trim, lots of fringe and doilies and daily dusting. :-)

Steady exposure to water will patinate some areas more quickly than others. Around the sink rim and faucets:

The light salmon spots here, for instance, are where a lemon was dripped on the way in or out of the fridge and not wiped up, removing the patina. It darkened again in about a month.

Someone on the kitchen forum wanted hardcore copper counter usage pictures. Here you go:

The Crime:

The Cleanup:

The place where we had to seam two sheets along the "L" of the peninsula has held up admirably, in fact it gets less obvious as time goes on; certainly no worse than many solid surface seams I have seen:

It does ding, as you can see from the long side of the peninsula where a castiron pan was dropped. But we honestly find this just adds to the charm:



What would we do differently?
If I could have afforded it, it would have been nice to have had the metalworker bend all the counter corners as he did for the farmhouse sink. It's a sleeker (and possibly safer) option than the sharp square corners. We don't have kids so we're not too worried, but it might be a consideration for families.

If I were doing it again, I'd be sure to keep the sheets flat while stored. We rolled them for about a month while we figured out how to do the project -- we've had some slight bowing where the sheets want to return to that original rolled shape. It might also have been prevented with a vacuum press or other means of "ironing" the sheets before or after gluing.
We got our 4' x 10' copper sheet (Revere copper) from a local building supply distributor -- I'd look into that option before ordering bigger sheets online; most everywhere has a lumberyard or materials supply that has the sheets in stock for roofing contractors.
The barstock we did have to special order - Storm Copper shipped them for a minimal fee but it was a bit of a hassle to go collect such a big crated package from the freight depot.

On the whole, though, we are in love with this yummy metal and think it's added immeasurable value (aesthetic and otherwise) to our kitchen. It's certainly been a lot of bang for the buck.



Looking forward to seeing pictures of all of your copper tops --


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Yikes, all my photos vanished. Once again!

Steady exposure to water will patinate some areas more quickly than others. Around the sink rim and faucets:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The light salmon spots here, for instance, are where a lemon was dripped on the way in or out of the fridge and not wiped up, removing the patina. It darkened again in about a month:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The surface is endlessly changing according to use. A dinner guest last weekend actually asked whether it was marble (!):
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Someone on the kitchen forum wanted hardcore copper counter usage pictures. Here you go:
The Crime:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

The Cleanup:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Same spot, a few months later:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
The place where we had to seam two sheets along the "L" of the peninsula has held up admirably, in fact it gets less obvious as time goes on; certainly no worse than many solid surface seams I have seen:
at install:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
a year later:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

It does ding, as you can see from the long side of the peninsula where a castiron pan was dropped. But we honestly find this just adds to the charm.
right after ding:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
a year later:
Image and video hosting by TinyPic


What would we do differently?

If I could have afforded it, it would have been nice to have had the metalworker bend all the counter corners as he did for the farmhouse sink. It's a sleeker (and possibly safer) option than the sharp square corners. We don't have kids so we're not too worried, but it might be a consideration for families.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

If I were doing it again, I'd be sure to keep the sheets flat while stored. We rolled them for about a month while we figured out how to do the project -- we've had some slight bowing where the sheets want to return to that original rolled shape. It might also have been prevented with a vacuum press or other means of "ironing" the sheets before or after gluing.
We got our 4' x 10' copper sheet (Revere copper) from a local building supply distributor -- I'd look into that option before ordering bigger sheets online; most everywhere has a lumberyard or materials supply that has the sheets in stock for roofing contractors.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

The first DIY copper countertop thread was a big part of the inspiration to use copper on the bar in our basement remodel. We still have a few things left to do (Tiling the bar front for one!) but the metalwork is complete.

Here some pics!

Bar 1

Bar 2

Bar Sink

...and a closeup of the finish....

Finish Close Up


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Wow! What an awesome forum! Totally inspired our cool new basement bar. Thanks to all who posted instructions and pictures.

mongo -- nice finish on the copper. is that sanded? looks great!

hoping this link to my pics will work....

Here is a link that might be useful: Copper Bar 90% done!


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Coppercat - It appears that great minds do think alike! I believe we are using the same tile you used on your project.

The finish is sanded. I used 3" medium scotch brite discs to apply the pattern to the bar top and foot rail. I used 2" discs for the corbels.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Mongo, I got that tile @ home depot for $5/sqr after originally finding it online for $15/squ. I would advise laying the tiles out on the floor in the shape ur going to use them and make sure it looks ok. I discovered after they were up that about 10 squares out of the 60 I used were significantly lighter than the rest and make a visible pattern on the wall even though they all looked exactly the same as I pulled them out of the box. It was also a real pain to grout. I wouldn't change it tho, that tile looks perfect with the copper! Post more pics when it's done!


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Finally got the bar done! Here are some pics of the finished product

[IMG]http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d154/FFlyte/Bar Top/IMG_0288.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d154/FFlyte/Bar Top/IMG_0289.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d154/FFlyte/Bar Top/IMG_0289.jpg[/IMG]


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Lots of info on this and the original thread - thanks guys! I'm planning on making a non-coated (raw) countertop. I'll probably accelerate the patina initially using a "Florentine Brown" recipe. My aim is to go for the rustic look, so will embrace dings, splotches, etc. Some Qs:

I will have top counter seams. What are some ways of joining the sheets? One way would be to lay a copper strip (maybe thinner gauge) underneath the seam, butt the two sheets together and glue it all. Might not even need the underlay strip. You could also solder it, but then the solder is a different color. Another idea is to use that copper colored epoxy or glue, but then that'll be different than the patina (but maybe that won't matter). Thoughts?

Edging. My initial inclination is to fold the edges over and under the 1.5" base and nail it underneath. Any suggestions on how to do an outside and inside corner?


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

While I like the idea of the narrow strip underneath for joining, but you might run into an issue - the pieces won't stick very well to each other and you may get lifting at the join. You may want to go to a local sheet-metal place and talk to them about it. Many of them do custom counters and may be able to help with joins.

No way you could solder it - you just won't be able to get it hot enough once it is on a piece of plywood and it wouldn't be rigid enough to attempt soldering without backing.

The copper epoxy is the color of aged copper. You would see a line, but it wouldn't be a glaring color difference. It may not work well in a really narrow, shallow joint however. It would be difficult to force it into the joint and the layer may not be thick enough to be strong - might crumble out. It's worth a try though. I would do a small mock-up and see if it is workable.

You really won't need anything to accelerate the patina - you will be amazed at how quickly it occurs on its own.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

I am so impressed with the beauty and artistry of these DIY projects - YOU PEOPLE AND YOUR BEAUTIFUL COUNTERS ARE AN INSPIRATION TO ALL!!!

So of course, I am wondering whether:
1.) you ever cut on your counters (my guess is no - I don't cut on laminate without a cutting board either),
2.) you can put hot pans on it (it's a pretty good conductor of heat, right?), and
3.) whether any of you grounded your counters, and if so, how?
4.) you have any recommendations on sheet thickness and what to do about sharp edges.
5.) you have any concerns about copper toxicity (I know, it's antibacterial, but there are cases of copper toxicity from unlined copper cookware...)?
6.) you are beeswax users?
7.) you practiced first, or just jumped right in?

Thanks for the inspiration. I would love to do this. I might experiment with the powder room vanity before I try the kitchen counter...


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Started counters today...

This post was edited by pruitt6 on Tue, Mar 4, 14 at 1:29


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Started counters today...

This post was edited by pruitt6 on Tue, Mar 4, 14 at 1:28


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

This is the small counter on the side of the stove. Bought

1 1/4" thick wood base. Then added a 1" 1/2" moulding which fits over cabinet base. Am trying for a gift wrap corner which will be cemented on edges of moulding. So far so good. Any suggestion will be appreciated. Thanks for all information. It was the inspiration for doing this project. The pictures and completed projects are amazing. P.S. Am using 16 mil copper sheeting.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

First side done. Scratched the finish but not concerned. Am going for patina finish.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

First side done. Scratched the finish but not concerned. Am going for patina finish.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2\follow-up

First side done. Scratched the finish but not concerned. Am going for patina finish.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2\follow-up

First side done. Scratched the finish but not concerned. Am going for patina finish.

This post was edited by pruitt6 on Tue, Mar 4, 14 at 1:24


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Newly installed Copper counters in kitchen.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Newly installed Copper counters in kitchen.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

They're beautiful! Can we see close ups of the corners?


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Close up of corner. Allow for the copper to extend beyond the counter on both sides to cover the edge (1.75") or your measurement plus 1/4 " to bend under counter edge. You are going to fold the copper over the edge with a rubber mallet and a 2x4 piece of wood the length of counter edge clamped with a furniture wood clamp on one side. Then cut to corner at 180 degree or straight. Then fold the wing around corner. Then you use the mallet and the wood dam to bend the copper over the edge and use mallet to bend under edge. We used air gun staple to attach edge to under counter. We used copper with protective coating of PVC. Otherwise you need to protect copper with soft cloth to keep from scratching. Hope this helps. You can fill the edge with metal epoxy, like used in metal repair. Do a practice with a piece of cardboard or paper to get a visual before cutting copper or ordering your copper.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Flat copper sheets glued to substrate with 3m glue before bending over edge. Celebrate hard work with popcorn and coke.


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

Cool! Can you estimate your cost and time commitment?


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RE: DIY copper countertop #2

I finally did the math. The counter materials were $1500. The time was 0ne month to complete the kitchen. The cost of total project including appliances, paint, exception of refrigerator and disposal. Bought appliances, stove,dishwasher, microwave, from foreclosed home owners for $700. . LG brand, they were used for about one year. The cost of lighting and chandeliers, sink,faucets are included. It has LED lighting surrounding the recessed lighting box. total $3600.


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