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Modular Homes VS mobile home

Posted by Minxie (My Page) on
Tue, Dec 20, 05 at 7:37

Please dont confuse Modular and mobile home. They are not the same. My modular home took on Hurricae Rita a few months back and lost one half of shingle. The mobile home down the street is shambles


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

A huge different exists.
On the trailer one pays a sales tax, which could be well over $$$$.
No sales tax on a mod, and quite often no one can tell the difference - actually there is no difference, except the modular design is much more standardized.
Much as an automobile.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

When we bought our mh, we didn't pay a sales tax. The title is no longer a car title. Modulars have wooden frames and mhs have metal ones.
Minnie, I've seen damage from hurricanes and tornados that flattened stick built homes, mhs that were flattened, but 2 rows down they were still standing. We had a storm with 100 mph winds. Our mh didn't have any damage, the modular across the street had siding and shingles ripped off. They were just more exposed to the winds than we were. It takes good construction to withstand storm damage, but also some luck.

Kat


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home...Minxie

Minxie, I just noticed I spelled your name wrong. Didn't have my glasses on...really sorry about that!

Kat


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

actually there is no difference, except the modular design is much more standardized.
Much as an automobile.
*****
Earthworm,

The idea that modulars are standardized is a big misconception today.
Here in Vermont there's a developer putting in a subdivision and all the homes are modular. He's using a manufacturer in New York where the building codes are more stringent than most of New England. But each home is completely different and NONE can be seen as a factory built home. And these homes are selling for over $300,000.
All th ehomes are custom built to the buyer's specs and some are downright beautiful.
Click the link to see what modulars are like today.

Here is a link that might be useful: Modular home manufacturer


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

There is a hugh difference between a modular home and a mobile home. A modular home is constructed with the same materials as a convential site bult home, except the modular is built in a climate controlled factory. Modulars are built to federal and state standards. They are also built to be transported.
We bought a 2 story Modular home in 1985 for $50.000. We bought a 5 acre lot $17,000 , to put the house on. We did our own foundation to their specs, trimmed and finished it out ourselves. Then in later years added 2 hugh additions to the house and a pool.
Loved the house and maintained it properly.

House was just listed for $480,000.00, You can't get that with a mobile home.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

just a note to most of you, mobile homes are no longer made, they stopped making them in the 1970's now they are manuvactured homes,
mark


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

And Secrataries are now called "Administrative Assistants".
Salesmen are "Account Executives".
Garbage collectors are "Waste Management Specialists".

I'm not denegrating mobile homes. But sometimes this renaming thing gets out of hand. If it's got a frame and you can put wheels on it and move it, it's mobile.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

christopherh , sorry but these are real and legal definitions so get your head straight
open your mind and learn something


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Mark,
I guess you're unable to comprehend saracsim. Unless of course you're an administrative assistant to an account executive for a waste management specialist.

I quite well understand the legal terms. But even if the term is "manufactured housing" everybody still calls them mobiles. Look, it took a loooong time to get away from "trailers", so at least accept that!
But let me know when you come across a "Manufactured Housing Park". Up here they're still called "Mobile Home Parks". Even after 30+ years of the new "legal" term. And some of them are pretty darn nice places!


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

My not-so-mobile home sits on 6 acres private property, attached to a permanent foundation.
It's twenty years old, has been re-painted twice and the roof (regular pitched roof) has been re-shingled five years ago.
It's located in an area where the summers are very dry and hot, winters are wet and cold. Still looks good inside and out, and it's value has increased along with the property value.
I call it "instant house".


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Here is our modular

http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=8AaOHDlm4bNWdK

Here is a link that might be useful: Our Modular Building Slideshow


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

We live in a 1 yr old customized "mobile home" it was from the company's "modular" series but arrived on wheels from the factory in 2 sections. The wheels and axles were removed and it was rolled onto the foundation. We were told we could buy the same home as either a "Modular" or "Manufactured Home" - the only difference was the modular would cost us $8,000 more because of the paperwork and extra inspections, that "certify" it as being modular. Because our lot was zoned for "mobiles" we opted to save the 8K. We are thrilled with our house which sits on a foundation (tires and axles removed). I suspect laws vary state to state as to who can transport and set-up a Mfg Homes. In Nevada they must be licensed and bonded. In Nevada once a "Mobile" is set onto a permanent foundation it can be converted to "real property" like any other home (and usually required by mortgage companies). We actually opted not to pay the $60 fee so our "mobile" will devalue and thus save us lots of tax dollars. We have no plans to ever move (we are retired) but if we do, we can pay the fee and have it "certified" at any time. We visited 2 factories before deciding on the brand we bought. I would urge anyone considering buying either a modular or "mobile" to visit the factory. Reputable ones welcome you. I was impressed. I was also impressed with the amount of customization available. These are not cookie cutter homes. We started with a base plan then stretched it 4 feet, moved walls, added double doors for my office, added every energy saving feature available (added insulation etc). The few problems we've had were fixed by the factory service rep.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

nvoneacre,

Thanks for the info on your home. Which manufacturer did you purchase from and do you know if they are available throughout the western states?


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

These are referred to as "on frame modular", kind of a cross between a double wide and a FHA home. If there was only $8K difference then you has an FHA home with the carrier still attached. If it came with a title, then you bought a doublewide passed off as a modular. If it will not qualify for a 30 year mortgage it is not a modular home. Anyone should be suspicious of a modular home bought from a lot that sells doublewides..a true modular home is handled through a general and licensed building contractor.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

nwesterner: the brand is Nashua built in Boise. We also visited the Guerdon factory in Boise they are very competitive. The other mfg we considered was the Fuqua made in Oregon. I believe all three companies are good and all ship homes most everywhere in the west as far as I know. I would suggest a trip to the factory to see for yourself how they are built.

bigdee: Once on a foundation and certified as part of the real property they do qualify for 30 yr mortgages, just like any "modular" or stick built house.

Here is a link that might be useful: Nashua


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

"...If it came with a title, then you bought a doublewide passed off as a modular. If it will not qualify for a 30 year mortgage it is not a modular home..."

This is a MAJOR misconception. And as nvoneacre says, yes they DO in fact qualify if they are on a foundation on real property. Only those in parks or on rented lots don't qualify. And they also increase in value just like a "real" house. Because they are in fact..."real houses".


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Christopherh and nvoneacre, an HUD home DOES NOT qualify for a 30year FHA loan. If the structure was built and certified to meet LOCAL and FHA building standards then it will qualify for FHA and conventional loans and insurance. If it comes with a TITLE and is HUD certified it is considered MOBILE whether or not it is on a foundationperiod. On the other hand a modular can be placed on a foundation with its carrier still attached "on frame" and still be eligible for an FHA 30year mortgage, but ONLY if it meets LOCAL codes and ordinances as well. In recent years, in North Carolina, most towns have ordinances that do not allow HUD manufactured homes at all. I dont know about the area you all live in but it is very hard to get homeowners insurance at an affordable rate on a HUD home. A premium for a 60K doublewide around here is about $800 verses $400 for a $120Kmodular. You are right there is a misconception.a doublewide is NOT the same as a MODULAR. Do your research there is plenty of info on the web.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I live in a modular. So I know the difference. And NO home here in Vermont can be erected on a permanent foundation unless it meets the state codes. So yes indeed, mobile (single AND doublewide) homes that are on foundations and on private lots DO qualify for 30 year mortgages. Banks around here grant them all the time. The only homes that are HUD homes are in parks. And no, they don't qualify for 30 year mortgages. No land.

There's a doublewide on 3 acres down the road that just sold for almost $240,000. I think it qualified for a mortgage.

So just because you are familiar with your state doesn't mean you're familiar with all the other states. Go to New Jersey. You won't see mobile homes anywhere unless they're in a park.

Oh, and by the way, NOT all loans are FHA. A VAST majority of mortgages are conventional loans. Besides, FHA doen't loan any money. They just guarantee the loans.

And as far as titles go, not all states require titles on mobiles. Especially ones permanately erected on a foundation.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

OK lets make this simple..
When you shop for a factory built home be aware that there are 2 entirely different types, they are, FHA spec & HUD spec.

1. FHA spec
a. All the same benefits as site built
b. Needs no steel chassis and is set with a crane

2. HUD spec
a. Restricted zoning
b. Has a steel chassis used for structural integrity and mobility
c. Hard to qualify for conventional loans
i. Higher interest rate or points
ii. Equity of home usually is not enough to secure 30 year loan unless the property it sits on adds value
iii. Higher insurance premiums
iv. Less likely to appreciate in value as much as FHA spec house

Dont get me wrong, HUD homes provide affordable housing and are a good value. However be prudent before you buy because there are a lot of HUD homes being passed off as modular.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

bigdee speaks the truth. Thanks for being so clear in presenting FACTS.
I've tried to get this point accross before, and I'll say it again......
This is not about bashing, snobbery or stereotyping.....
There are specific details, some of which are affected by locale, that separate these homes.
That is to say..... If you have a well-built mobile and compare it to a poorly built modular, there are still going to be key technical differences (not necessarily related to the structure) that can benefit the modular.

I could keep typing, but nothing I say could be any clearer than what bigdee has typed.

With all that said.......
Manufactured homes have their market. If you want to live in a park and don't want to deal with owning property, go for it. If you own a well-built manufactured home and want to move it to a piece of land you've been looking at, check your local codes and go for it. There are other scenarios that could be illustrated showing the value of a manufactured home. There were many years where owning a mobile and paying lot rent was less expensive for more square feet than an apartment. Owning your own house to do with what you like is also a liberating feeling, even if the place will eventually end up in a landfill. For many folks it a good fit, or at least a step into the direction of owning realestate.

If you don't own anything right now, and are thinking about buying something to put on property, you should really consider how some of the gory details of titles, mortgages, real vs personal property issues and so on effect you.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

HUD specs are the MINIMUM Federal standards that are employed when building a home. And around here there are very, very few mobile homes built to those minimums. Our modular home dealer is in New York State. They also sell mobile homes. And New York's minimums are higher for ALL housing than the HUD minimums. So this dealer cannot even sell "HUD homes".

The single wide mobiles that are in parks around here are usually built to standards higher than HUD. Only the cheapest mobiles are HUD homes. Around here all the mobiles have at least a 3/12 pitched shingled roof. Especially when we average 148 inches of snow in the winter. Not on HUD specs, but necessary.

What I'm trying to say is that you CAN build a HUD home to FHA or state specs. The same frame, but 2x6 exterior walls 16" on center instead of 2x3 walls 24" on center. And other upgrades are amployed to make these single and doublewide homes just like a "normal" home which, when set on a permamnet foundation on a private lot WILL appreciate JUST like a "normal" home. Our dealer just got in a LOG sided doublewide. With a 7/12 roof pitch. When that house is set, nobody's gonna drive by and say that's a doublewide just by looking at it. But it's gonna have that metal frame attached just like a HUD home. And it won't depreciate either. But it will be subject to the restrictions about zoning mentioned above by Bigdee.

And you can get a 30 year conventional mortgage for these homes, at prevaling interest rates, they cost no more to insure, and they will appreciate in value. Possibly not like a modular or a site built hoime, but they will appreciate nonetheless.

I'm gone


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Well said christopherh. I totally agree except that I believe Mfg Homes appreciate the same as any other type home once they are converted to real property. Appreciation is based on condition, location, size, etc, same as stick or modular. The Nashua website indicates 30 yr financing IS available. I think what has been missing in this thread are specifics as to the differences in quality between Modulars and Mfg Homes. In terms of the materials, construction methods, etc, I suspect you will find little or NO difference between most modulars and most better built Mfg Homes. I suspect we could agree that there are poorly built Mfg Homes just as there are poorly built modulars? What I don't believe is that there is a huge difference in the construction quality of my Mfg Home and the construction of any modular. 10 yrs or even 5 yrs ago that might not have been true but today it is. I will conceed that the modulars may well be bigger and fancier but not better built. And certainly not for the $s spent. I am baffled by the hangups re: metal frame (under my house they are HUGE steel "I" beams and I am GLAD they are there), titles and HUD vs UBC code. None of these things speak to how the house was ACTUALLY constructed. Like christopherh said the HUD standards are a minimum. I have also read that the HUD standards are performance based rather than materials based, which I see as preferable.. So maybe someone can tell me how their modular's 2x6 on 16" centered walls are better than my 2x6 on 16" centered walls? So WHERE EXACTLY is this HUGE difference?


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

It is so hard to convince people who are always on the defensive. I was not talking about construction quality (although HUD homes have had a bad reputation)....I was talking about construction specs, there is a major difference. How many HUD homes are designed to withstand 165 MPH winds or an F2 tornado or a 40Lb/sf snow load? Does a HUD hone have 2x10 floor and ceiling joists? What about double band perimeter joists or the total weight of the house being 20% to 30% more than that of a site built home!!!! Come on guys,let's cut the bull and be realistic. You get what you pay for and there is no possible way a 70K doublewide is going to equal a 140K modular.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I think we've found the problem. If one spends twice as much it MUST be twice as good... not necessarily so! An actual breakdown of the house's components, labor to build, labor to finish on site, inspections, permits, etc would be a fascinating comparison. We could probably agree that a house built under climate controlled conditions is likely superior to site built in many respects. Our house does have a 40lb, trussed roof, (We could have ordered upto 120 lb). I admit we do not have the 10" floor joists but then you probably don't have those giganic steel "I" beams. I don't know if it's rated for a Tornado but it did come down a road at 70 mph so can verify it didn't hickup there. It is also attached to the foundation as per code. It's also Super good Sense rated (Like EnergyStar), housewrapped, low-e double pane windows, R40 ceiling, R33 Floor, Certainteed siding, tile entryway, real oak cabinets. I can't say the weight but it would not surprise me at all if it weight every bit as much as your modular per sq ft. I truly hope you enjoy your home as much as we do ours. You've never said who the mfg was? I would certainly encourage everyone considering a modular or mfg home to go visit the factories and decide for themselves. I'd only buy from a company who allowed tours.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Well, for the sake of argument...

A 100k modular and a 100k manufactured may have 1 key difference...
The manufactured will always be reported as manufactured when listed, even if the title has been converted, in SOME areas. A title on a house will usually result in lower resale value. So, whether your house is built better or not, it's an uphill climb to convince a potential buyer because they know the house will have only been required to meet HUD codes.

There are terrible modulars out there. There are excellent manufactured. Educate yourself to your local area, the vendors reputations and the build quality of the manufacturer. There's bound to be one that fits your needs well.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

bungeeii - I can accept that to a degree. We are retired and have lived in the same spot for 20+ yrs, with no plans to go anywhere. Ours is a somewhat unusual circumstance, in that, we decided not to convert our home to real property so that the house will devalue quicker thus saving us taxes. We do pay real property taxes on the improvements to the land (garage, deck, foundation, etc)they have appreciated over time. The taxes on the house however are classed as personal property, and as such will go down in value. We see that as a plus not a minus. It does not preclude us from converting to real property down the road if god forbid we needed to sell. The only time one cares about appreciation is when it's time to sell. Different states however could vary in how that is determined. I totally agree that everyone needs to look at their circumstances, do their homework and get the most for their dollars. Mfg housing and modulars are 2 of many options.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

"...So, whether your house is built better or not, it's an uphill climb to convince a potential buyer because they know the house will have only been required to meet HUD codes..."

A very small percentage of manufactured homes are built to this minimum code. A VERY small percentage. And EVERY home built in the United States is required to meet HUD standards. It makes no difference whether the home is manufactured, modular, paneled, assembled or site built. All must meet HUD codes. So you can indeed have site built HUD homes near you and not even know it.

"...Does a HUD hone have 2x10 floor and ceiling joists?..."

Sure! If that's what the customer orders. And by the way, most stick built homes only have 2x8 floor joists and 2x6 ceiling joists. That's a BOCA standard.

"...How many HUD homes are designed to withstand 165 MPH winds or an F2 tornado or a 40Lb/sf snow load?..."

How many stick built homes are built to those standards? Here in Northern New England we really don't have to worry about tornadoes or 165 MPH winds. But the snow loads are a priority. So yes, the HUD homes will withstand those loads around here.

"...You get what you pay for and there is no possible way a 70K doublewide is going to equal a 140K modular..."

Now if a homebuyer has 70K to spend on a home and they like what they see, what's the problem? And there's no way a 140K modular is going to equal a 400K modular either! You DO get what you pay for.

And resale value is determined by the buyer. Nobody else.
(As he drives past a 240K doublewide that just sold.)


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

"So you can indeed have site built HUD homes near you and not even know it."

rubbish

See the link below

Look, there are advantages and disadvantages to owning anything. NVoneacre has obviously shopped for and purchased a very good product. The variables associated with a titled house is actually to his advantage. I've shopped and made what I believe is an excellent choice for my needs.

It doesn't serve anyones interests that might be reading this site to spread bad info.

There are differences between manufacturers.
There are differences between states.
There are differences between Manu and Modu and Site.
Anyone who buys needs to be sure they've planned and researched their purchase. Do not make an impulse buy!

Here is a link that might be useful: HudUser Publication


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

bungeeii - the HUD user publication looks interesting. The date of 1998 however makes it WAYYYYY out of date with regards to MFG Homes. It looks like most of the data is from 1996 or earlier. Trust me tons has happened in the housing market since then. I agree with your advice. Purchasers should look at ALL of the options and do your homework. Take their time, visit the factory, read the fine print, etc, before signing on the dotted line.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Another more recent HUD publication (2003) same site. It speaks to the similarities between modular and Mfg Homes and goes into the evolving technology that will make them both better and better. It mentions that many factories build both. The similarities far outweigh the differences, though that has not always been true.

Here is a link that might be useful: HUD 2003 publication


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Thanks for the updated link, NV1. There's good reading for anyone that takes the time.

Just remember....
While there may be companies driving the HUD market into the future, there are also those that will build to the minimum standards just to make a buck. And, yes, the same could be said for modular producers.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Buyer beware is always the rule, no matter what you are buying. For the most part I don't think there is much direct competition between modulars and mobiles, but that's a guess. Most folk who buy land zoned for mobiles will go that route and all others will consider either site or modular. Does that make sense? My main point in all this is that mfg housing has dramatically changed in the last 5 years. One CAN buy a good quality "mobile home". One that will rival a stick or modular in how it's constructed. Does anyone know the breakdown in prices for the various elements required to build then set, a stick, modular, or Mft Home? It would seem that the labor portion would be the biggest variable between factory homes and site built? Just curious if anyone has the hard data on that? not a guess?


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

"...Does anyone know the breakdown in prices for the various elements required to build then set, a stick, modular, or Mft Home? It would seem that the labor portion would be the biggest variable between factory homes and site built? Just curious if anyone has the hard data on that? not a guess?..."

The land costs the same, the lot clearing costs the same, the well and septic costs the same, Running power is the same, The driveway is the same, setbacks and side yards rules are the same.

And having built a modular, the total costs were about the same as a stick built home. Just the time was much shorter. 90 days from contract to move in as opposed to 6 months. And nobody builds houses up here in winter. But modulars are set all year round.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Just to clear things up, mobile homes are better today because people expect more and are willing to pay more but to say they are built as well as site built or true modular is hogwash. Mobile homes fill a need for affordable housing and they have to do it in a very competitive industry. It is just plain common sense that you cant expect the same value for half the price. A good indicator is weight, a mobile home averages around 24lbs per square foot verses 38 lbs for a site built or 45 lbs for a true modularthe weight is almost proportional to the selling price! Also since the law of physics is a constant, which home would be the greatest challenge for high winds? Yes it would be the heaviest homethe modular! FEMA conducted a damage survey after hurricane Andrew and proved that modular construction faired the better than mobile homes and SITE BUILT homes.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

And two LOG homes withstood the full brunt of Andrew and received NO damage. So does that mean we should all live in log homes? I would love to as there are seven in my community. One is over 4,000 square feet.

We purchase what we can afford. And if someone likes the mobile home then that should end it.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Christoperh The topic of this post was "Modular Homes vs mobile homes" and that is what Im trying to clear up. Purchasing a home (any home) is a big decision and should be thought out with as much knowledge as you can attain. I question your comprehension skills because evidently you think this is an attack on you. I apologize if I made you think it is.I was just trying to supply an educated answer to the person who posted this question.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Bigdee - it is as clear as mud the way you explain it. Where do you get your numbers for the weight of the homes? Is this an average of all MH of all years? same with modular. I will not conceed that my MH weighs much less than your modular p/sq ft. If the structural components are similar it is not rational that the weight would be much different. re: wind resistance. HUD codes now require that HUD homes built in certain coastal areas be beefed-up to withstand higher winds, I think it's called a D-sticker or some such. Along the same lines HUD homes built for cold regions have beefed up insulation. re: Fire Insurance rates. The attached link says that MHs have a lower fire rate per thousand than site built homes (less than half as a matter of fact). Whether you like it or not or believe it or not, Better built Manufactured Homes DO rival Modular and site built homes in construction, performance and quality. Please site your sources.
Who built your modular?

Here is a link that might be useful: Manufactured Housing FAQs


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Cost comparison: Site built/ Modular / Manufactured Home. While the attached link does not break down the construction costs, it is an interesting chart none-the-less. Source: This report is part of the Affordable Housing Project of the National Conference of State Legislatures and received funding support from the Fannie Mae Foundation.

Here is a link that might be useful: Construction Cost Comparisons


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

.I was just trying to supply an educated answer to the person who posted this question..."
**************

No, You're telling us your opinion. And you just won't let it go.
And I'm saying there are manufactured homes JUST AS GOOD as modulars. We just are going to have to agree to disagree.

It's an amazing thing about discussions. For every "fact" somebody supplies, the other side can supply just as many "facts" to support their arguement.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

First of all lets get some facts straight
1. HUD codes were enacted by the Federal Government to provide affordable housing that was safe and energy efficient.
2. This is accomplished by using less structural and less than standard components that state codes allow. This makes sense, after all how else could you reduce construction costs?
3. HUD codes are more stringent in the fact that they mandate that all states have to honor them in order to provide affordable housing. Again that is the purpose of HUD code.
4. Site built homes require more structural integrity so it takes more material to accomplish this.
5. No site built structure would ever pass local codes if it were built to HUD standards
6. True HUD code has improved since 1976 but it is still less than standard.
7. Modular has to meet FHA and local codes but they have to go one step further: they have to have the structural integrity to be lifted with a crane. This explains why there is 20 to 30 percent more material used.
8. Modular has to use MSR (machine stress rated) lumber. This means every piece of lumber is run through a machine where it is load tested at a specific load over a specific span and the deflection is checked with a laser gage.
9. In most cases modular factories serve several states and jurisdictions so they are usually built over code to satisfy what ever area the may end up in. This has to be certified and notarized by an independent engineering firm and a copy made available to the local inspection board....in my case 16% over code.
10. You are not likely to find the following in a HUD structure or many site builts
a. double perimeter rim joists
b. 2x6 trusses with 2x10 bottom chords (ceiling joists) 16 " O.C.
c. double ply trusses at dormer openings
d. triple ply trusses at stairwell
e. Triple jack studs around window openings
f. Center beams at marriage wall 2x10 4ply! for floor and ceiling joists, EIGHT ply over open areas
g. Radon removal system
h. two layers roof felt and 6 nails (not staples) per shingle
i. OSB on both exterior and certain stress locations on interior walls
j. 2x10 double headers over openings
k. schedule 40 plumbing with above spec fixtures
l. 12 gage wire throughout with commercial grade receptacles
m. HUD homes do not use a top double plate on their walls

I live in a custom site built home that I despise but I have a second home at a resort that is modular. This resort community would not allow any modular so I had to give a presentation to the board of directors and the archeological review committee on the true facts of modular housing. I wanted this house located on a lot between two houses selling for $600,000 each so you can imagine the opposition that I faced. So I prepared myself with as much documented knowledge that I was able to find and was prepared to hire an attorney if necessary. Much to my surprise I convinced the board that my modular met, and in most cases exceeded their requirements! Today I am welcomed in this community and my home on one occasion has served as a storm shelter during a tornado warning.
They now welcome and encourage modular homes because of less impact on the environment.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

The biggest problem I see with your so called facts is that they are anything but. You seem to want to paint all MHs with a 30 year old brush. You simply have no idea what you are talking about:
Bigdee said
"First of all lets get some facts straight"
HUD codes were enacted by the Federal Government to provide affordable housing that was safe and energy efficient. "

Close but no cigar. The HUD codes were enacted to rectify and bring under one umbrella, manufactured housing, safety, and building practices. The first act of Congress was in 1974. With many revisions and amendments since then. They cover all aspects of the house including fire safety, air quality, and of course performance.

BigDee said..."This is accomplished by using less structural and less than standard components than state codes allow."

NO WAY JOSE......Wrong, Wrong, Wrong.... HUD codes are performance based, not materials based. Manufacturers use engineering and innovation to meet the structural requirements. Your 40 lb roof load isn't better than my 40 lb roof load because it uses 2x8s, and mine is engineered Truss. They are structurally equivalent.

BigDee said..."This makes sense, after all how else could you reduce construction costs?"

It makes NO sense. There are lots of ways to reduce cost. Among them are: purchasing construction items in huge quantities, assembly line efficiency, in-house building thus no down time for bad weather. No architect or general contractor's fees, fewer inspection fees. Lower labor costs for factory workers vs onsite sub-contractors. No crane operator or enginerring fees. As previously stated many of the costs are identical (land, sewer, driveways, etc).

BigDee said..."Site built homes require more structural integrity so it takes more material to accomplish this."

Try to pick up a site built house and take it down the road at 70 miles per hour. My house is built BETTER than some site built homes I've seen in our area which supposedly passed code.

BigDee said..."No site built structure would ever pass local codes if it were built to HUD standards."

Wrong AGAIN... I suspect my house would have an easy time passing local codes. Why in the world would it not????? You can't seem to let go of the fact that many, maybe even most MH mfgs NOW build way above the required minimums, and yes even good enough to pass local building codes. You simply do not know what you are talking about. 30 years ago you would have been dead on, but this no longer true.

BigDee said..."Modular has to meet FHA and local codes but they have to go one step further: they have to have the structural integrity to be lifted with a crane. This explains why there is 20 to 30 percent more material used."

We considered a crane set because of our site and yes it is done with MHs too. The setting crew accomplished it w/o a crane which is great since it would have cost a bundle (yet another cost not needed with most MH setups.)

BigDee said..."Modular has to use MSR (machine stress rated) lumber. This means every piece of lumber is run through a machine where it is load tested at a specific load over a specific span and the deflection is checked with a laser gage."

IF this is true, which I doubt, it would seem to add a lot of unnecessary cost to a modular. Where is that specified? Please site the code?

BigDee said..."In most cases modular factories serve several states and jurisdictions so they are usually built over code to satisfy what ever area the may end up in. This has to be certified and notarized by an independent engineering firm and a copy made available to the local inspection board....in my case 16% over code."

(and that extra engineering & certifying cost some $$s I suspect?)

I've asked twice before who built this wonderful house? and it does indeed sound like a great house. The fact that you won't tell us makes me wonder if it even exists.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

http://www.selectmodular.com/......this thing has turned into a peeing contest....my first posts was to share info with minxie, but you 2 guys keep butting in with nonsense.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

BigDee,
Thanks for the link. The houses there look quite nice, though I don't see some of the specs you mentioned. I can see why you are proud of your modular. As far as I know these forums are for the sharing of ideas by everyone. I think it's useful to those seeking a balanced view of a topic to hear both sides. Modulars are a great option, but for value I think Manufactured Houses are hard to beat.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I think all 3 of you are trying to paint with too broad a brush. Now, if you want real good info, re-read all of my posts. I'm not only the voice of reason, but I'm always right. :>)

I crack me up.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

bungeeii, It is great that we all get to have our say. Thankfully, those reading these posts will not get a one-sided view of modular and manufactured homes. THIS IS A GOOD THING... I think we can all agree on a few things; do your homework, visit the factory(s), and make a choice that best fits your needs and pocketbook.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

This has been more of a debate than a general info forum. There has been some good points brought up by all sides,,,,,,and yes, I agree manufactured homes are a good value thanks to the guidelines of HUD, the free enterprise system and good ol manufacturing techniques. The days of site built homes are numbered because factory built homes can control quality and costs beyond the realm of general contractors. This is my last post, it has been a pleasure guys.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

It's been a fun discussion and yes debate. Now I can get back to my primary job as grandma to, two of the cutest, kids, this side of the rockies..


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

it really helped! so exiting to read ;)
--
ann@digitalhardcore.us


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I see there are some who still think there are BIG differences between modulars and manufactured homes. In the interest of not repeating the contents of this tread I'll post so others can hopefuly benefit from the active exchange of ideas it contains. I totally agree that it's important to carefuly shop for the home you buy. It's very dangerous to assume however that Manufactured homes are much different structurally or visually than modulars. As is stated above many manufacturers build both using identical materials and construction methods. In our neck of the woods at least resale value of manufactured homes on foundations are par with site built. For anyone who hasn't looked at (so called) mobiles homes in the last 2-3 years should go on a factory tour. See for yourself how they are built. You will be amazed.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Hello Everyone I am new to this site. Have read most of the past post. I have decide to sell my stick home for a double wide manufactured home. I have decide to go with Pine Grove manufactured homes. They seem to be built very well. Its amazing when I get done it will take all I sell my home for here in CT to buy the land...well....stepic....electrical.
To get a piece of land in the mountains of NY. I need a home with no inside stairs due to my disabilities of getting around. What I am doing is trying to learn all I can before purchase. I found asking for the cost of the home from two different dealers. The cost of each home and the options are way different in price. So Its hard to tell if a home is worth more of less than a stick built if you are being charged a big amount. Or more than you have too. Its all up to the dealer. How much they are going to Up the price. And there cost. One dealer said to me after its delivered they charge for an extra set up for the ends are not finished with siding and leaving the doors and what ever she said. So you have to make sure what the bottom line is in cost before you can compare prices. And they will be the ones to deal with if things go wrong that they set up. You need to have some kind of trust. As well as research if there are any complaints on them with the Better Business Assoc. So I would appreciate anyone to tell me other hidden cost to worry about. Or even how to bring the price down. This is the last home I hope to have. It will take all that I have to get it. Thank you for all your time. Carolyn

Here is a link that might be useful: Pine Grove Manufactured homes


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I don't know about your manufacturer. We bought our modular home from Designhomes.com in Prairie DuChen in Wisconsin. They don't sell trailers --- just modular homes. You are welcome to tour their factory and even watch your home being built. It is like a stick built home, but most of the work is done in a factory. (BTW, because of this, after a year we have had no settling at all!)

There were no hidden costs. We got what we ordered which included setting the house on our foundation and a one-year warranty. Also, there was no "salesman" who was due any sort of commission (or Realtor, BTW). We bought directly from the factory. From what I see on this forum, there are plenty of places where they sell trailers and call them modulars. Don't get stuck with something less than what can be compared to a stick built. The building codes for your modular should not be less than those codes for a stick built home.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Hi Roberta
Thanks for a reply. These homes are double wides formally mobile home as very little of them these days are moved once placed. There not a modular. Not sure a lot of difference but I assume modulars are made a little more to code of stick build. I will have a developers upgrade to all 1/2 inch dry wall and it seems to be constructed very well. They only sell directly to dealers in NY from PA. And the dealers are the ones who set the prices and offer you set and delivery. And they do let us tour the factory in PA which I plan on doing in the Spring. The company itself sound good and are a debt free company. Its the part in NY I have to wheel and deal with. Two have quoted me different prices for the same model and options. It may have been the same thing for your modular. If you had shopped around. Its something I didn't think was going to happen. I just felt the first place wasn't really helping me with the project so I changed companies. And to my surprise the prices were a lot less for the same things. Including $7,000 just for the same model. My home alone with the options I picked are over $130,000. There will be a slab with hurricane tie downs with piers. They just updated the standards here in NY so I guess it will do. I already have two old mobile homes in NY on a small lot. They are only 10 by 50's and on a mountain area. There over 50 years old and haven't blown away. So I would think in 50 years they have improves some. I enjoy the idea of having them cost less than a modulars as so will my yearly taxes be lower. I am betting no one realizes the cost they sell us for the homes can be bargained down if you shop around. There are a lot of dealers. I just was hoping to hear more on any hidden cost as I have already experienced it first hand. Now I am a little less trusting. So much to consider with taxes and fees,perk test, wells etc. I know that this company Pine Grove has one the best luxury bathroom design I have ever seen. If my condition declines and I end up in a wheel chair there will be lots of room for it. Again thanks for your response. Any info will be helpful.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I am continually amazed at these modular home owners who think their homes are so different (ie better) than my "trailer". A quality manufactured home will be on par with stick built or modular. There are the good the bad and the ugly in each of these industries. I do like some of the specs on Roberta's modular, but the photos could have easily been taken in a manufactured home factory, that's how similar the construction is. Roberta do you mind telling us what you paid? Yes, manufactured homes will depreciate like a car, BUT only if it is not on a foundation and converted to real property. At that point the home/property will appreciate (or depreciate) EXACTLY the same as a modular or stick built in the same neighborhood. All these things and more have been hashed out before. I agree that everyone should visit the factory before deciding on a builder. Manufactured homes have come a long way since grandma's single wide park model. If you haven't looked in the last 5 years, you will be surprised - I guarantee it.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I completely agree with nvoneacre. I own a Champion Manufactured Double Wide in the Mid Hudson Valley in NY. Champion also builds modulars in the same plant. It was built in 2002 and I have not have one single issue with my home. As a matter of fact, we have visited a modular company where we live and we could honestly say that the construction of our home is up to par if not better than the model homes from this company. They use the same materials, showers, fixures, cabinets etc. We added all the upgrades that Champion offered. The home is on 2 country acres and it has been appraised equally to ranch style homes in our area. It sits on a slab foundation. Please do not pass judgement on Manufactured homes of today without getting your facts straight. Manfacutred homes are still a great choice for people who can not afford stick built or modular. Roberta, good luck and enjoy your home.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I am seeing some confusion still about the similarities of Manufactured Homes and Modulars. This thread has a lively discussion about the similarities and minor differences in the two types of construction. I think modulars are a great idea but QUALITY Manufactured Homes are on par with them in every way and a better value in my humble opinion. There are few differences as this thread will show. The name of this forum is "Manufactured Homes" so if the modular owners are uncomfortable with that they should surely go elsewhere. My advise for those who are confused - visit several factories to see for yourself how and with what they are built. The new Factory Built homes of today are a huge improvement from even just a few years ago. Go look for yourself.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

While I do not have the experience claimed by Kistner, I do have a modular home by Nationwide Homes. The company has changed ownership since my home was built. But I was present at the setting of 4 Nationwide homes and toured the factory in Martinsville VA prior to my purchase decision. My house is built to the full and complete building code for my State. No HUD code involved. My plans were reviewed and stamped by an independent Professional Engineer and also reviewed by the NC Dept of Insurance plus the local building inspector prior to the building of my home. There is nothing at all inferior about the house I have. I have seen some others that I would not choose to buy. And the manufacture of mine was less than perfect. Some problems had to be corrected on-site. Would I go modular again? Yes, for certain. It is a marvelous concept but the execution of the concept can be lacking.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

christisam2001
You asked about manufactured homes and quality. Like busdriver I'm not an appraiser. In Nevada at least once the manufactured home is attached to a foundation it is appraised the same as it's stick or modular neighbors. This may well vary from location to location. We have been extremely happy with our Nashua. (We are just happy home owners and not affiliated in any way with this company). Their factory is in Boise as is Guerdon who now only (I think) sells modular. They formerly sold both. Both service the western states and have internet sites. Visit the factory of any homes you are considering and take a construction savy friend with you. Be sure your lot is zoned for manufactured. Good Luck


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I just now ran across this forum and have to respond. We've in lived 5 new homes...3 built by us, one by a contractor and the one we moved into a year ago, a manufactured home by Skyline. We decided to purchase this one because of the price and also the quality of materials and workmanship. It conforms with HUD and local codes. We had some upgrades...4/12 pitch roof rather than 3/12, large tub in the master bath, extra insulation in the ceiling, wider eaves, extra cabinets in the kitchen. We had a 2 car attached garage built as well as an 8' x 20' front porch with pillars. We made some changes to the inside floor plan to better suit our needs. The siding is hardyplank, the slab is below grade, the 'foundation' is concrete block with crawl space. It is set on a nice lot with newer homes all around it, both 2 story and ramblers. The owner of the dealership drove past it several times before he could determine which one was our home because it looked just like the stick built ones in the neighborhood. They 'ain't' what they used to be. It all cost us less than $100 sq. ft. and the going rate here for stick built is $150 and up...mostly up.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

The days of seeing gains like those in the above posts where an $80,000 purchase sells for many times that years later are over for at least 10 years. Don't expect any major real estate boom any time soon; real estate is going to return to what it's supposed to be for, a place to live and call home, rather then a slot machine that pays out.

With that said, I got a super deal on a manufactured home built in 2003 with new 2 car detached garage on a .65 acre lot for under $40k. The modular homes in a new subdivision being built start around $100k and that's with no garage included and they are still selling! They don't look that much different, they have the same or less square footage, yet they are selling for more then double the price.

I guess it depends on what you need. Do you need a basement? The manufactured homes around here will qualify for a traditional mortgage as long as they are anchored on a frost free foundation. Surrender the title and they become real property, treated as such.

Why pay more for less in an environment where real estate is going to go down adjusted for inflation going forward?

If you can find a good deal, go for it. A house is a place to live, a place to call home, that's the important thing.. not bling bling, unless that's your style.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Dissident, I have been saying that for years. A home is the place to raise your family. A home is the place to make memories. A home is the place to come to at the end of the day. A home is NOT a place where you can't play on the lawn because you'll ruin the value. So the kids have to play in the local park. A home is not the place where you must keep looking up the "comps" online every month worrying about your "investment".

Real estate rises and falls. So what? I didn't get in over my head with the mortgage, so I know what the payment will be from now until I pay it off.

You like your manufactured home. That's all that matters! Who cares what other people think! My modular is a modest ranch on a dirt road in the woods in Vermont. My main heat source is my woodstove. My "next door neighbor" is 1000 feet away.

Like you, I built a HOME, not a slot machine.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Remember this: ANY house can be moved if you really want it to be.
Modulars are moved (on wheels *gasp*) the same way Manufactureds are until they get to their intended destination.
Modulars and Manufactureds are BOTH built in a factory.
There are more similarities than not.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

Modulars are moved on TRAILERS, not attached wheels. They are removed from the trailer at the site and the trailers are taken back to the manufacturer.

And yes, you can move any house. A guy bought the land (12 acres) across from me last year and moved a 24x52 foot stick built ranch from 8 miles away and placed it on the foundation. He LOVES the house as he had lived in it for 20 years, but HATED where it was. So he upped and moved it.
He started at midnight and by 2 AM he was at the new site. He did it at night as there's no traffic at all during that time. he encountered only one other car on the road in that 8 miles.


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RE: Modular Homes VS mobile home

I worked at a company here in Indiana that built both Modulars and Manufactured (as they called them) and I can tell you from the floor dept till final finish at least at this company, there were not a whole lot of difference. Options also make a big differnce. And, I bought a brand new Modular from them when I worked there. Have since sold it. I now own a manufactured home on a basement on three city lots with a 2 car garage. Was a foreclosure got it for $19,700. Just took out a loan to remodel and it was appraised at $75,000 before I did much to it. So there is some for to ponder on.


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