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Lighting plan for new construction Kitchen

Posted by dhuston (My Page) on
Mon, Jul 25, 11 at 16:02

I am looking for some help on planning my lighting for our new kitchen. I will be doing recessed lighting with some pendants over the island and maybe a sconce over the sink window. Need some advice on where to place the recessed lights in comparison to cabinets and walkways. Also thoughts on 2 or 3 pendants over island. Will be using regular incandescent cans to start but hopefully put some Cree LED replacements in over time. Also definitely want to put some LED under-cabinet lighting on a dimmer. Any thoughts on a good solution for that. I will be doing all the wiring myself along with my father.

Here is the layout:

Photobucket

Thanks in advance!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Lighting plan for new construction Kitchen

Just put plenty of recessed lights in the kitchen. Nothing puts out good lighting anymore. Keep in mind when you are working at the counter or washing dishes, your work area may be in your shadow. That is the problem I have. I just have one recessed light and a ceiling light. My neighbors put in 5 or 6 recessed. The government is controlling our lighting so much it is hard to find a good lamp to read by.

I don't care much for hanging lights, I don't like anything blocking my view or hanging over my head. They are very pretty though.


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RE: Lighting plan for new construction Kitchen

I calculated the total number of recessed cans based on a rule of ~ 35 lumens per sq ft and a rough estimate of 600 lumens output per can (I de-rated the LR6 output).

If you're using other sources of lighting (pendants, sconces, suspended and/ or cove lighting) as well, the number of cans will decrease accordingly.

The usual rule is to place the recessed can lights ~ 1' from the crown molding (if present) or from the cabinet.

Recessed cans will typically trap quite a bit of light within the can (assuming standard incandescents/ CFL lamps). PAR lamps will produce light cones.

The Cree LR6 / CR6 and Sylvania RT6 on the other hand have less light trapped as the light emitting elements are just below the lens and facing outwards. The LR6 has an ample light spillage as the elements are not as deeply recessed.

The net result is that a recessed can using a 15 watt CFL is not as bright as a CR6/ RT6 LED lamp.

As for LED UCL, there is the LED UCL DIY thread on this forum which you may find helpful.

Here is a link that might be useful: LED UCL DIY


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Other lighting sources?

If you're subject to energy efficiency laws like Title 24, you'll find that the cost of the typical CFL recessed can package (bulb + can with integral ballast + trim) is roughly the same as the CR6 / RT6 package (Led module + can).

If you're willing to try out other lighting sources/ fixtures for example indirect lighting, you'll get a kitchen that will be unique for quite a while since most typically use recessed lighting (cans or T8 fluorescent troffers), surface mount boxes/ fixtures, pendants, sconces.


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RE: Lighting plan for new construction Kitchen

David - what kind of spacing do you usually use between cans? Also should I try to put them on either side of the range or one in the middle, there will be lights in the hood. In Florida so no government telling me what lights to use, yet.

Thanks for your help.


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RE: Lighting plan for new construction Kitchen

~ 3' between cans. Final spacing was affected by the location of the joists and other physical obstructions (vents, beams), relative position of the nearest ones to the wall (~ 30" from the wall).

I have the lights laid out in a regular pattern, excluding the one over the sink. So yes, there were lights on either side of the range.

My kitchen was remodeled around the range.


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