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Need high-powered snake light

Posted by weedyacres (My Page) on
Fri, Jul 15, 11 at 12:10

Not really a home lighting question, but I am looking for a snake light that throws off 10 foot candles at a distance of 6 feet. I'm not finding those kind of specs when I google around for high-illumination lights.

Can anyone point me toward a source, type of bulb, recommended spec/configuration, or anything else to help me get a light that will meet my needs?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Need high-powered snake light

"10 foot candles"

No longer a commonly used unit.


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RE: Need high-powered snake light

It is in elevator code. Any help with converting it to what the rest of the world uses?


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RE: Need high-powered snake light

It is no longer used much since it is not adequate for defining luminous intensity reliably.

You might be able to convert it to lumens, but the geometry involved make s it a less than simple issue.


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RE: Need high-powered snake light

1 foot candle is ~ 10.764 lux.

Possible alternatives could be
1. Using a standard work light.
2. Mounting a high output light such as an Olight SR90 on a tripod.
3. Building your own using high output LEDs (eg - SST-50/ 90, Cree XM emitters). There are people on candlepowerforums who build their own high output lights.

Here is a link that might be useful: Useful formlas for lighting


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RE: Need high-powered snake light

Or one lumen per square foot.

An isotropic (uniform in all direectins) one-candela light-source emits a total luminous flux of exactly 4π lumens (since a spheres is 4π steradians).

A partially covered source would emit a differnet amount.
Block off one half of the light and the output becomes a flux of 2π lumens.

Is this for commercial work?


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RE: Need high-powered snake light

This is for an elevator car top and I just want an inexpensive light that's bright enough. No desire to build our own. So if I found a light that was 410 lumens or 11 lux, that would emit 10 foot candles at the source and then, presumably, dissipate over distance?


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