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LED Cans on High Ceiling

Posted by judi82 (My Page) on
Fri, May 28, 10 at 17:12

I am planning a kitchen remodel and will be raising an 8 foot drop ceiling to 9 1/2 feet. I have an open floor plan where the dining area and the kitchen are basically one room. There are no windows in the kitchen, just in the dining area.

I am receiving mixed messages from lighting stores and kitchen designers about the ability of 6" LED recessed cans to adequately light the kitchen area, given that the ceiling will be 9 1/2 feet high. In addition, one store salesperson told me that I should put a 4" LED can over the sink so that the light would be more focused. I am planning LED uplights on the upper cabinets and LED lights under the cabinets.

I am so confused about what I need. Any suggestions as to a logical way to proceed with this?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

9.5' is no problem. We've designed the LR6 in 10' ceilings. We have also used a 4" downlight with a 950 lumen output in even higher ceilings.


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

There should not be any issues. In fact, the LR6 produces more light than the equivalent CFL/ incandescent can.

I was pleasantly surprised that the net result was much better than the old "fluorescent light bomb" recessed box and cans that I had fitted screw in CFLs before.


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

Thank you David and Lightguy. I feel better about my plan. I just came back from looking at the LR6. It looks great, and the price is right. I only wish that it came in 3000 klevin. 3500 K seems like it will be a little too cool. I guess that is because I am accustomed to incandescent.


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

I can't comment on your original question,but do want to suggest that you definitely add a can directly over the sink. We have one, but it's on a separate switch and we miss too much dirt on the dishes if we don't use it!


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

Judi- I agree, the 3500k is too cool. At least in my opinion. The 2700 is quite nice. Although if it were up to me I'd pick 3000k as well.


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

I agree with compumom that a can directly over the sink is a must.

I am leaning towards CREE recessed cans which means that 3000 K is not an option. But I do have two questions: What is the advantage of CR6 vs. LR6? According to CREE's website, the only difference I can see is that the CR6 dims to 5% with a standard incandescent dimmer vs. 20% for the LR6. A salesperson has told me, however, that I can get the LR6 down to 5% by purchasing an expensive dimmer.

Also, the LR6 produces 62 per lumens per watt and the CR6 produces 55 lumens per watt, meaning, I think, that the CR6 is not as bright as the LR6. Is that right?

Finally, does it matter what housing the CREE goes into? The lighting store I visited yesterday recommended a Juno housing.


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

The main advantage is price.

I would trust the manufacturer's specifications rather than the sales person.

The older LR6 specification had the light output @ 54 lumens/ watt.

I would wait for the CR6 to appear on the shelves first before comparing, but I don't think the difference would be noticable.

The CREE lights can go into most cans.


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

Good advice! Thanks, David.


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

we are doing 2700 kelvin cree lr6 throughout our house. why would a 3000 kelvin be better? we like a warm light.


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RE: LED Cans on High Ceiling

It's personal preference. Cree doesn't have a 3000K unit anyway.
I prefer 3000K as it's closer to halogen. But this isn't a right or wrong question. If you like 2700K, go for it.


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