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Venting the Dryer Dilemma

Posted by Liya_2012 (My Page) on
Mon, Aug 6, 12 at 2:06

Hi everyone,

I hope you can help me, my head is spinning and I'm getting more confused by the minute.
We are moving to a new house, laundry room looks like the picture attached. Now that we are shopping for a washer and dryer we just noticed that the laundry room doesn't have the hole in the wall to vent the dryer!! First thought was to move the washer and dryer to the wall on the right (because it's the only one that the outdoor is on the other side) and creating a hole. Then we learned moving the dryer and washer will cost a lot of money because of all the water piping and electric plugs and stuff . So we thought of keeping it in place and just bend the hose 90 degree and to create the hole very low on the right wall. When we went to shop the sale guy told us that we shouldn't bend the hose, and if we ask anyone they will say the same, and we are asking for trouble if we do it. He told us that the hole has to be above the dryer and that is the only safe way. Hubby told him if it's above the dryer than we still need to bend the hose twice, first next to the dryer, second next to the hole. The guy said that is OK but to bend it to the right is another thing! is this true? and is it really dangerous to bend it. If not is it better to create the hole high on the right wall (then we will need to bend the hose 3 times) or low (we will only need to bend it once). Sorry for all the stupid questions but every house I lived in before was ready and I didn't need to think about these things before.

One more point, husband doesn't want the headache and said we should just buy a vent-less dryer. The problem I've read soo many conflicting reviews that I'm worried that dryer will not function as well as the regular dryer.

Thanks in advance, and honestly I don't know how people made decisions before the internet LOL.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

When you decide on a dryer, check the installation manual on-line...most dryers permit up to 4 90 degree bends, although it reduces e maximum length slightly...also, you can't use past hose...I should be rigid metal...it's not a major project...fairly simple actually....
Condenser dryers are not as efficient and considerably mor expensive...
Hope this helps! Good luck!


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

Ottlane you helped alot, thanks so much. One more question please what is "past hose"?


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

I made is sound soo easy, but actually i'm conflicted because there are cabinets between the washer/dryer and the wall.


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

Your appliance salesman is seriously confused and misinformed.

There is NO requirement that the wall opening be above the dryer. That's just plain silly.

Bends in the exhaust ducting ARE permissible, but must be kept to a minimum number. Every 90* bend adds resistance to the airflow and reduces the allowable maximum length of the ducting. Check your dryer's installation instructions for details, it should include explicit details on length vs. number of bends. Use SOLID-FLUME ducting, not the expandable/accordion stuff which adds resistance to the airflow. (I think that's to what ottlane is referring above -- old-style expandable ducting ("past hose").

Based on your picture, I'd vent it out that right wall (which is directly to the outdoors), through the cabinet beneath the sink, cutting 4" holes in the cabinetry panels as needed. The machines will have to be moved forward from the wall by 6" or so to accommodate the ducting (and the bend behind the dryer).

Whoever designed your laundry room is an idiot (apologies for the comment if it was you and/or hubby!) for not facilitating proper exhausting of the dryer ... but that's not unusual. It would have been so much more reasonable and accommodating to place the machines ON the right wall and rearrange the cabinets accordingly.

An alternative is swap the washer and dryer positions (if you can get longer water supply and drain hoses for the washer to reach the connections) so the dryer ducting does't have to pass behind the washer.

OR ... you could consider running the exhaust up INSIDE the wall behind the dryer, into the attic and to the right for outdoors access. There are connection flumes available that recess into the wall so the dryer can sit more flush to the rear wall. The questions on this method are the additional expense, whether attic access is possible, and the impediment in-wall and through-the-attic exhausting presents to the future need to clean the ducting (it WILL accumulate lint residue and need to be cleaned).

Don't even think about a ventless dryer. There are very few on the market and they are troublesome.


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

dadoes I can't thank you enough, your post eased my mind.

I totally agree with you, who ever designed the room wasn't thinking straight, and don't worry we bought the house that way.

Will update when the room is done. Thanks again.


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

Dadoes,If this room isnt upstairs and I take it isnt, couldnt they vent the dryer down through the floor right behind the dryer? Then run rigid duct to the outside wall. It could fasten to the joist to keep it off the ground? This would prevent cutting through all the cabinets but then would have to work under the house. Just a thought.


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

I was thinking this too - most dryers have an option to vent downwards. The only issue is now you have a big hole in the floor, which inevitably won't quite line up with the replacement dryer bought 10 years later. (I'm not sure how this works when pedestals are used - can you vent downward and then backward and out the house inside the pedestal?)

Also, the two pictures provided appear to show the washer and dryer reversed. In the photo, it looks like the dryer is at the left, so running a duct past the washer and through the cabinet wall could get difficult; instead, vent behind to between wall studs or leftwardto an almost immediate 90 degree bend outdoors, hidden under some extra 12" cabinet to the left of the laundry machines.


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

I would still opt for through the cabinets and out the wall as being the shortest, straightest path ... and more accessible when the ducting needs to be cleaned.


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

In my home I have a crawl space under the house where the duct can run to the outside. You don't state what is below the laundry room. Either a crawl apace or a bacement would be suitable, especially if the ouside wall is above ground level I have about a 25 foot run to the outside and the prevous owner had allowed lint to plug the entire 25 feet of duct. I took it down and put in 6" furnace duct with adapters to go from 4" to 6" at each end. The air flow is slower but there is plenty of room for a lot of lint before the duct plugs.


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RE: Venting the Dryer Dilemma

In my home I have a crawl space under the house where the duct can run to the outside. You don't state what is below the laundry room. Either a crawl apace or a bacement would be suitable, especially if the ouside wall is above ground level I have about a 25 foot run to the outside and the prevous owner had allowed lint to plug the entire 25 feet of duct. I took it down and put in 6" furnace duct with adapters to go from 4" to 6" at each end. The air flow is slower but there is plenty of room for a lot of lint before the duct plugs.


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