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Making Rosettes for Christmas

Posted by patty2430 (My Page) on
Wed, Dec 19, 12 at 21:48

We're invited to our DD new in-laws for Christmas dinner. I plan to bring a big plate of Christmas goodies, and will be making rosettes tomorrow or Friday. Anyone out there know the best way to store them so they stay crispy and don't get limp and soft?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

Are these made of frosting or candy? I used to store them on a cookie sheet in the freezer.


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

I'm assuming that you mean the ones that you make by dipping a rosette iron in the batter and then in hot oil, correct? I love those, and I love making them, but haven't in several years.

I used to store them in layers with newspaper between them; that is the way that was recommended to me and it worked perfectly. Do not put them in the refrigerator. Now that I think about it, I'm wondering if the newspaper was a good idea or not, but newsprint never came off on them and they were never a problem. So, if I were to do it again, I'd do it the same way.

Delcious!


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

Patty, it's been a long time since I made these delectible cookies...they are soooo wonderful. I never tried to store them for more than a day or two. As I recall, I lined a box with wax paper, dusted powdered sugar, then placed the cookies in a single layer with more powdered sugar between the layers. Not air tight.

Dorothy, rosettes aren't candy or frosting, but a delicate, lacy deep fried cookie made on a special mold that is dipped in a light batter then carefully submerged in hot oil.

They can be dusted with powdered sugar, chocolate, or served like a waffle....covered with a savory white sauce with chipped beef or mushrooms, etc.


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

I usually made them the day before I needed them and put them in a tupperware cake carrier but just covered them with foil.


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

I made Rosettes for many years, and finally I gave up most baking because standing is too hard on my joints now. I taught my DGD, (the cupcake pro) how do make them; it does take a little practice. I gave her my irons and now she often makes some for me. Probably won't this year though because the shop is keeping her so busy.

Rosette's are delicate, and time consuming, yet sooo good. After making them I let them cool on a cookie sheet, lightly covered with a thin tea towel, then after they cooled, covered them with another thin tea towel. You don't want the powdered sugar to "melt" on them. Try them when you have sufficient time to ruin a few at first. ;<(

Rosette cookies

Merry Christmas.

Sue


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

maybe instead of newspaper, use a brown grocery bag under them. I would think it would help keep them crisp by absorbing the oil. ? I have no clue though; whenever we made them we NEVER had any left to worry about storing! :)


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

I never liked them the next day. They tasted best freshly fried.


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

Properly made rosettes are a real treat. My mother was great at making them. She and the neighbor would often get together at the holidays and spend all day making rosettes. They'd always drain them on paper bags. If anything in the plastic storage containers, occasionally some waxed paper underneath and possibly between them but usually they were the perfect thickness so they wouldn't crumble until you took a bite, then of course when they "explode" your clothes are covered in powdered sugar! I've been meaning to try making some. I'd think it'd be a lot of fun and a lot of memories.


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

Juellie - precisely - a brown paper bag would be perfect. And you're right, the paper absorbs any extra oil.


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

I agree a brown paper bag, My grandma made them every year
for the holidays and always used paper bags.


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RE: Making Rosettes for Christmas

With the paper dividing the layers, they are fine for several days. No change in taste or texture. At least in my experience. Also, I do NOT store them in airtight containers.


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