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All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Posted by aloha2009 (My Page) on
Fri, Dec 13, 13 at 17:53

After reading about Neolith on GW this week, I checked around and there is one distributor only 20 minutes away (next closest looks to be about 900 miles). The info that I saw seemed intriguing but it seemed to good to be true...a marble look that has incredible properties for countertops.

The beauty of the stone is still very vivid in my mind. We compared it to the Calcutta marble and even close up, I couldn't see a difference. The Neolith had the depth that we know natural stone has.The rep had a great assortment of marbles, granites, onyx, ceasarstone etc. You could tell though he loves this particular material.

Though I had seen videos, it was crazy to see IRL. He literally took the edge of a hammer and ran it across the Neolith, with sparks flying, and not a single scratch! Though he doesn't have the marble Neolith in yet (we saw one he is discontinuing), he plans to have it at a 4 or 5 price grade level. Considering the Calcutta marble that was closest in looks sells in the exotics.

The durability was crazy. No etching, scratching, non porous. I did note a weakness and that is the noise. It was like setting items on a piece of glass. Rather annoying but considering the look and durability, I think I've finally found my forever countertop material.

Here is a link that might be useful: Neolith Marble

This post was edited by aloha2009 on Fri, Dec 13, 13 at 18:28


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

how do you find out where the distributors are? I'd love to see it in real life. thanks for sharing!


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

The company is from Spain called The Size

Hopefully you're lucky enough to be close by one of the distributors.

Here is a link that might be useful: Distributors of Neolith

This post was edited by aloha2009 on Fri, Dec 13, 13 at 19:29


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

There are several companies either manufacturing or distributing this thin large format porcelain. There is a distributor in my small city for stonepeak's Plane series, and even daltile is making one now. Kerlite is another. The nearest NEOlith distributor for me is about 400 miles.

I'm investigating using it for my shower walls and bathroom countertops, and hoping it will work out that I can as I love the maintenance aspect of it. The problem here seems to be finding an experienced installer; my distributor is working with his factory rep to see about getting support at install. I'm about 6 months out, so hopefully they can work something out. Please post if you have it installed, with lots of pictures!!!


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Anybody have any info on a pricing? Obviously it will vary but if anyone as a ballpark price/sq ft I would love to hear it. Our kitchen is finished but I am thinking of replacing a counter at my business which takes a lot of abuse. Would love something as durable as this.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Below link to price list in Massachusetts

Here is a link that might be useful: Neolith slabs/prices


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

I was going to call around on Monday to the fabricators...it's one thing the price of the slab and it's another the installed price. I've seen a lot of fabricators here, so hopefully one of them can chime in.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

That website with the pricing does not have the estuario (marble) either. Seems like that is not as easy to find?


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The place I went to had a marble from another large format porcelain. He said he was discontinuing that one because he said that quality control wasn't as good as Neolith (he pointed out the rippling effect). He said though it would look basically the same. The "stone" collection is due out early next year. He thought he'd be listing the 10mm in the 4 or 5 level. The fabrication is the big unknown.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

The fabrication will be the big question. Do you use a stone fabricator or a tile pro? How does one cut such a large format tile? I'm sure a CNC granite cutter could do it, but what "tile installer" has access to that? Not even most stone pros have access to that! Most just have a bridge saw. What type of bedding mortar does it require? Thick mudbed? Certainly not thinset. Is edging material made? Or does it have to have the cut tile edge with a grout line there?

It's also more expensive than most low to mid grade granite. $40 a square foot means that you're looking at $80-$100 if the fabrication prices follow stone's fabrication pricing. But, since it's considerably more complex than fabricating stone, I'd bet it's more.

Don't get me wrong, it's a great idea. It's just not a finished idea for the product, and finding the labor is likely to be extremely difficult.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

According to European fabricators, it's stone fabricators who use the material, not tile pros.

Here is a link that might be useful: more info


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

The outfit we found is a stone fabricator, said pricing was similar to granite. Didn't get into detail about it, I mostly deal with group 3 and 4.


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" What type of bedding mortar does it require? Thick mudbed? Certainly not thinset. Is edging material made? Or does it have to have the cut tile edge with a grout line there?"

Apparently the edges can be mitered like stone and there is no bedding mortar required, according to the manufacturer:

Here is a link that might be useful: Fab and Install


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This stuff looks and sounds great! I will ask my architect about it tomorrow.


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The noise factor could be really grating. That would drive me crazy. I think it would feel very commercial. Maybe they will come up with a sound dampening substrate. I'd wait.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Great news!

My DH & I were at a Home show and found a Neolith distributor. He sells Neolilth for $65/sq. foot installed instead of the $125/ sq I was quoted before with another distributor. At $125 we had given up the dream of having these countertops. He works with one specific fabricator who has been doing it for the last few years.

Neolith in marble is not only back on the table, it will be our countertop!


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Wow, congrats!!!! Please post updates, would love to see it!


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I'm confused! The Size claims that Neolith can be used on cabinets to reface them. To do this, it must be very thin. If so, what is used as a "core" for countertop thickness? Is that why all edges look like they have "envelope" folds?
Or, do they make veneers from thick slabs?


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I received a sample of this product. I have been running it through some average homeowner abuse tests, none of which touched it yet. After I have finished with the chemicals, I'll start in with some metal tools, lol.

This sample I believe is five millimeters thick. Most of the pictures of installations I have seen look like they have a mitered edge piece to make the whole effect look more or less like a standard two or three centimeter stone counter. Presumably there is some material within, I do not yet know what it might be.


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Aloha - that's great news about your counters. I hope it all works out easily and can't wait to see them installed!


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Neolith I think has a 2mm thick up to 10mm.

When he gave me the $65 price installed it wasn't clear EXACTLY what I'd be getting. I will have to discuss this further. We could go with the thinner I think and have the edging or just the 10mm for a more "thin" look.

Canuckplayer - I'm not sure what you mean by envelope edges.

Smallhouse - short of taking something and smashing it against it to crack it, I don't know what would hurt it.

That said, I do want to know what has to be done to support any overhang...we'll have about 18". You can bend Neolith one way but if you bend it only slightly the opposite, it cracks. This is the one BIG issue fabricators have with the product.


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Aloha, whereabouts in the country are you? I would LOVE to get similar pricing here in the Mid-Atlantic if possible!!


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I saw this at a home show, and was curious because I hate the shine factor on granite and quartz. But it's basically laminate, at quartz prices. They can make it thick, so you don't need a substrate. Or you get it thinner. It seems to only go up in price.

I don't understand the appeal. Why not just get laminate for a fraction of the price?

I had laminate in my kitchen from 11 years ago until 2 years ago. When we decided to redo the kitchen, we stopped using cutting boards and hot plates, etc. We're ripping it out in a few weeks anyway. That laminate held up better than any of the samples of stone/quartz/etc that we had brought home to consider.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Are you sure it is the same thing you looked at? It's not laminate. If anything it's porcelain tile, but baked under more heat and pressure for increased durability, and in a large format so no grout lines.


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In Colorado. I could only find it at the Stone Collection, but now when I googled it, I found a few other distributors.

Amberm145 - are you mixing Neolith with some of the shower installations that i saw also at the home show. This is NOT laminate!

Here is a link that might be useful: Testing of Neolith


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Info on Neolith, which has been used in Europe for walls, outside facades, floors, subway tunnels, and, yes, counter tops.

Installation specs, http://www.thesize.es/media/size_descargas/de_000117_contenido_pdf_13503.pdf

Here is a link that might be useful: What is Neolith


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For the sound dampening that snookums2 mentioned, maybe the Noble SIS would work. It is a Sound Isolation Sheet membrane and it is listed as 3/64th of an inch thick. The link below is a listing of the membranes of the Noble Company and scroll down to the bottom for their SIS and it has product description and installation links.

We used their CIS (crack isolation sheet) on the floor for my master bathroom as a crack protection and insulation under the heated floor mesh under tile for a concrete slab floor. It was thinner than the thinnest Ditre we first considered (and would have been a problem with the small floor tile inset we used) and I did not want any threshold problems. After it was installed, I walked in the room with just that installed, and it was SO much warmer and also, unexpectedly quieter, than the surrounding regular slab.

We also used the Noble TS membrane for the steam shower that was a water and vapour barrier and crack isolation for the slab onyx and limestone tiles we used for shower walls and it worked great for that. If someone is considering the Neolith for a shower, they might look into this or something similar.

Noble had several membranes for different situations of crack isolation, sound dampening, water and/or vapour barrier (and several had multiple qualities) so they might work well for this product in several different applications.

I have not looked up the Neolith installation specs so am unfamiliar with what they require for different uses.

Here is a link that might be useful: Noble membranes including sound isolation


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Aloha2009 - are you still going with the neolith? Do you have any updates? I'm very curious about it for my kitchen.


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It was most definitely Neolith, I brought home a brochure. I didn't ask about how it was made. It just looked like laminate to me. And for the price, I'd go with laminate.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

I read a KD blog article about this stuff and he was very enthusiastic.

I think it's a great concept - a durable non-porous, non-delicate surface that can have many different looks. Because it's thin, less energy is used in transporting it around the world, etc.

Unfortunately, we're at the wrong end of the curve here. It's like engineered quartz - it was hyped as the next big thing and super expensive. Now installs are still more expensive than granite even though the actual material must be cheaper to make than quarrying natural stone (yes, I know they use special machines, materials, and techniques...but still).

Neolith should be very inexpensive to produce, but because it's the new best thing, only high end fabricators will address the learning curve and offer it at $$$ prices.

I will be cheering this product on and looking forward to it being more available because I think it must be the solution I dream about to replace bathroom tiles.


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I'm interested in any updates as well. I talked to a stone distributor who said the price is in line with a 'B' granite, meaning the next step up from entry level granite. He confirmed that a granite fabricator would do the installation. Does anyone know of any cons to porcelain like chipping?


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

We're likely going with ThinSlab, another large format porcelain slab line available from Oregon Tile & Marble, for our island and nook cabinet. The only fabricator/dealer for Neolith in Oregon doesn't have the Classtone line (resemble marble) yet and that's what I want.

I asked about chipping and cracking since it is covering a large span with essentially one tile. The supplier told me that it has a good track record in Europe where it's been used for a number of years and that ThinSlab (and perhaps Neolith) has a small percentage of resin added, which gives it some flexibility. That eased my hubby's concerns about it. If I had it on the perimeter where the sink is, I'd do a 1/4" positive reveal to avoid having any edge hanging over the sink, just in case.

Pental is carrying a new line called Lapitec. Same principle but oh, wow, way more expensive. My KD was told that she was told that it would be at least twice as expensive as Quartz. No idea why it's so much more. They also have Kerlite but they didn't have any samples on hand.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Meant to add another bit of info re: chipping. We've had 12" porcelain tiles on our island counter for nearly 20 years and we've had absolutely no chipping, even along the edge. And we're not careful. The tile is not quite 3/8" thick, right in line with the large format porcelain product. Not sure if our experience is a direct correlation to this new product but the only place I'd be concerned about chipping is where it's unsupported, such as along a sink edge.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Totally intrigued by this....wish someone would install it so we can get an "expert" GW opinion!!!


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Well, this stuff has been used for years in Europe to clad the outside of buildings as well as on floors in commercial buildings. I'd expect it to be pretty much bulletproof.
Can you play around with samples?


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

I was considering this seriously until I got the price from the fabricator (today) - $8500 for 33 sq ft!!!! Definitely not a B granite price. So unfortunately, I won't be able to be the GW guinea pig :(.

I do, though, have a box of samples and I promised my son he could try his best to chip/break/shatter them this weekend.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

$100 a square foot plus is what we've been quoted here.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Woah, that's steep. See the price list below. In Switzerland, installation of Neolith, for example, is substantially cheaper than, say, Silestone.

Have you looked at Dekton? It's supposedly even better than Neolith, Laminam, etc.

Here is a link that might be useful: Neolith price list


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I think dekton is through home depot, but only in certain markets (and not in mine).

GreenDesigns - was your quote to install over a pre-existing counter or for a new counter?


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Can anyone who has received good pricing for fabrication and installation of this project give out the name of their fabricator? I was quoted over $200 a sf. I am sure your fabricators would appreciate the referrals and I would certainly appreciate the savings!
Many thank!


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Those prices are for material only- installation is certainly not cheaper than silestone around here. Typical install involves mitered edge build up.

I had a job priced in this and several quartz products- Neolith basalt with a 2" edge- waterfall ends on island was exactly the same price as doing the exactly the same thing (with 2" edge) Caesarstone Pebble- $175-185 ft.

(I only have wholesale pricing so guessing -range reflects likely markup-priced Neolith at Amendola Marble and Stone- Wolcott CT)

The same job with standard 3cm quartz- waterfalls on end of island was between 50-80% of that price depending on the color (priced that in practically every white and grey quartz available)


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I just went to see the neolith estatuario this week in Brooklyn and it was amazing! Like a honed marble. Heat resistant and does not look like laminate at all! Saw a large slab if it. It's going to be my kitchen counter. The solid colors were nice too, but more contemporary. They did not look like laminates,either. Beautiful stuff. More like quartz. They can cut edges to look like veining going through just like marble.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Wow. It looks great. Here's a pic.

Did they give you an approximate price, Martha?


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

I am waiting for a reference for a fabricator that has experience with this material. They said it was like mid to high range granite pricing. The slab I saw had some grey and some beige/gold veining in it. Was really nice. I really thought it was honed marble. Only difference was that it was not cold to the touch. Will post more info when I get pricing.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

MarthaSINY, where in brooklyn did you see this? i can't wait to hear how you like it as your countertop. would love to do this in our kitchen as well.


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All things come around...tile is back, but without the grout this time.

I think this product is very intriguing (when it comes down from the stratosphere w/r/t price), but would be very worried about chipping it around the corners or near a sink. I would assume any damage is non-repairable.

My only reference is tile counter tops and floors, which generally hold up very well, but we've all had (or seen) chips from time to time.

But I love the look of this product.

The local company that carries it seems to focus on it only...it's the only thing they even mention on their website.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

I'm planning a master bathroom remodel, and have been considering using Neolith or a similar thin porcelain slab for surfaces (shower walls, bathroom floor, vanity top, and tub deck).

I called a local Neolith distributor (North Hollywood) but have not visited them yet. The distributor imports shipments of Neolith about every 6 months from Spain.The good news is that they had a recent shipment; the bad news is that if I can't find what I like in their recent shipment, it's a 5-6 month wait for the next shipment (unless I can use an entire crate of Neolith). This slab distributor has been selling Neolith for three years.

All colors are matte, not polished. They recommend 5mm thickness for walls and floors, and a minimum of 8mm, 10mm, or 12mm thickness for countertops. The reason for needing a thicker material for the countertops is for mitering edges (eased edge, 45 miter). The 5mm material weighs 2.5 lbs PSF.

The price varies by color and thickness. They gave a price of $12-15 PSF for 5mm thickness and $16-30 PSF for thicker material. Fabrication is same as for granite slabs, depending on the installer. Slabs are 12'x4' and have a fiberglass backing.

I am interested in the estatuario color, which they have in stock in the 12mm only. So, I would be able to use that for my vanity top and a tub deck, but I would want a thinner material for the shower walls.

I'm at least two months away from starting the actual remodel, but not sure I want to wait six months. Distributor is sending me a list of what they have in stock at 5mm and then I'll go visit.

I've looked at Fiandre thin porcelain slabs, imported from Italy. Fiandre has 8 colors; my local distributor carries two colors: calacatta and white, in honed and polished, 5'x10' slabs, 6 mm thickness, $17 PSF.

Also, I looked at the Artistic Tile Max Fine line ($40 PSF).

Then there's StonePeak Plane series, which I've not yet looked at. The slabs are manufactured in Crossville, TN. StonePeak's parent company is Fiandre - so I'm guessing that this may be same material, but manufactured in U.S.

Attached is a photo of Fiandre Calacatta honed.


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LARemodel -- So are we looking at $40-75 PPSF installed? This seems really low compared to what others have been indicating. What are your local granite guys charging to install?


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The Brooklyn website is http://hgstones.com. Williamsburg I think. They sold out of current slabs and are expecting another shipment from Spain that I can select from. There are four different designs,each has mirror image for a total of eight. I will be getting price quote tomorrow. They are a great team to speak to and they are very excited about this product!


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I had asked about fragility and he said it was very resilient and non porous. A blow torch on the video from the trade show didn't even damage it. Obviously, if I drop a heavy cast iron skillet down with all my weight, it might damage he said, but that it was not fragile. Will ask about edges tomorrow. Watch this video it's pretty amazing what they showed at the trade show
http://youtu.be/5d_myR4WM70


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That picture of the island looks really great....must say it is still very intriguing.


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I was curious and found the installer guide (linked below, PDF)

It does contain some tidbits to consider:
a. Maximum overhang is 12 inches, with an apron and supports
b. Edges are the most vulnerable to chipping

Here is a link that might be useful: Installation Guide


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As for the fabrication and installation price, I was quoted a range of $40-$60 PSF by the local Neolith distributor. A fabricator for Fiandre porcelain slabs gave me a price of about $35 PSF. Two years ago I had Mont Blanc quartzite (natural stone, similar to Taj Mahal) installed on my kitchen countertops for $40 PSF.

I'm guessing that the installation price will vary depending on how much detail is needed. Also, if I use a color with a pattern and want adjoining panels book matched, then I would need extra material, which can add to the cost.

The local distributor has in stock 13 different colors of 5mm slabs that can be used on the shower walls; however, most of these colors are either too dark (Textile black), too bold (mela - an "apple green"), or too stark (cement) for the serene, spa-look I was going for. I suppose I could do something neutral, like Phedra on the shower walls and Arctic White on the vanity top. I found one website that offers suggestions for Neolith color combinations, such as Nero with Avorio or Perla.

Here is a link that might be useful: Neolith suggested color combinations


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Got pricing on 130+130 inches of counters (2 counters in L shape with range on one side and farm sink cut out on other).It's about $135 per SQ foot. 12mm
He said approx 7000 for my two counters for material, fabrication and installation.

Mitered edge eased (straight). He said it does not chip easily because the mitered is well constructed.

Sold out of current inventory of Estatuario slabs (marble like). Expecting 40 slab in next shipment but I would have to put deposit down to hold two for me when it comes in because they move fast and shipments are months apart.


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wow stunning! martha, can I ask who your fabricator is? I am in bklyn as well.


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Interesting that pricing in LA is ~$70/SF installed whereas the New York prices are double. That seems completely out of whack. The cities are comparable in general costs (i.e. both are expensive) so it's not a London-to-Cleveland type of comparison...


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It sounds like it has been around longer on the west coast, so maybe that explains it. As I said before, installation price sin Europe are actually a little lower than for Silestone.


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I was considering using same company that provides stone for fabrication because they have a lot of experience with it. The Brooklyn website is http://hgstones.com.
They have a dept for it.
Is the West coast price people are mentioning for Estatuario or another Neolith product? I was looking specifically at Estatuario. Waiting for a sample that is being sent to me.


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MarthaSINY,

I do not yet have a specific quote from a fabricator for Neolith - I'm going by the prices that the slab yard gave me. I called one fabricator for a price on a Caesarstone vanity top with cutouts for two basins - and that price was more like $125 PSF.

In the following link, there's a bathroom using Neolith timber color (I don't know how to move photo from internet into a file that I can upload.)

Here is a link that might be useful: photos of Neolith installed


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You can cut that quartz price in half by just going to Lowes or Home Depot (assuming your project meets the minimum order requirement).


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Well, I was just told, starting at 175.00/sqft installed, in the DC area. Ouch!!! I don't think so. Guess I'll wait until installation prices are dropping. See below.

"Neolith is manufactured in 3-mm, 5-mm, and 10-mm thicknesses and also is available with a reinforcing fiberglass backing or in laminates built from different combinations of 3-mm and 5-mm thicknesses. It typically costs from $10 per sq. ft. to $30 per sq. ft., depending on the color and the thickness.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

The high pricing for fabrication and installation of porcelain slab countertops is because the material was originally intended for wall-cladding, which does not require edging. Porcelain slabs require a mitered edge (e.g., cannot do a bullnose or ogee).Unlike laminated products, it does not chip.

I am considering either Neolith (Spain) or Stone Peak Plane series (Italy) thin porcelain slabs for shower walls in my master bathroom. I was given a price of $33 - $45 PSQ for material AND installation of Stone Peak Plane series for wall-cladding.

I have been told that Neolith is an inferior product to Stone Peak. (I am a consumer, not a sales rep.) Neolith is not rated for structural integrity. It comes in several thicknesses, 5 mm, 5+3mm, 10mm, and 12 mm. The 5 mm slabs are limited to wall-cladding; they should not be used on floors or countertops. The thicker material includes a fiberglass backing to strengthen it, but is still not rated. The 5+3mm slabs can be used on floors. The 12mm slabs can be used on countertops. The 12mm material has a 15-year warrantee, which does not include the cost of installation to replace a countertop.

Neolith slabs come in 4'x12' sizes in a variety of colors in matte. They plan to add polished slabs to their product line and 5' wide slabs.

My local distributor for Neolith receives a shipment from Spain every 5-6 months, so there is a long-lead time for a color if not in stock. If I want to use the material for more than one application in the same room, e.g., walls, floor, and tub deck, it becomes more complicated in terms of finding the colors I want in the appropriate thicknesses.

Stone Peak thin porcelain slabs are sold under several different names: Fiandre Maximum, Artistic Tile Max Fine, and Stone Peak's Plane series. These products are all the same material and are manufactured at the same factory in Italy. The differences between the three brand names is pricing and availability.

The Italian thin porcelain slabs are rated for structural integrity and do not need a fiberglass backing. That is why it is considered to be a higher quality product than Neolith.

The Italian porcelain slabs are 5'x10' and all are 6 mm thickness. They are manufactured in 15 different colors, in honed or polished. Availability depends on local distributor.

My closest distributor for Fiandre (30-45 minutes away) carries in stock only two colors: white and calacatta in honed or polished. My closest distributor for Stone Peak (an hour away) has the calacatta and several other colors in stock and receives shipments from Italy every 6 to 8 weeks.

I was quoted a price of $18-25 PSF for Stone Peaks Plane; pricing depends on color and quantity (lower price if purchasing multiple slabs). The price I was quoted for Fiandre was $850 per slab (about $17 PSF). A local fabricator charges $15-20 PSF for wall cladding the Stone Peak plane series - that would include walls and floors. It may be a little extra for cladding a tub deck.

The architectural designer with whom I spoke recommended that I use a natural stone (maybe a remnant) on the vanity top - as the detail required for the edging on the countertop would increase the installation price for a porcelain slab.

Also, she suggested using Schluter edging (spelling?) if I am partially covering a wall; e.g., if I stop at the end of the shower.

Here is a link that might be useful: Neolith installation guide


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Thanks for the info. When you say Neolith "is not rated for structural integrity" what does that mean?

According to their web site, they warrant all thicknesses for countertops except the 3 and 5 mm, which believe me, you wouldn't want as a countertop because it is so thin.

Also, I think they already have the polished surfaces.

Below, installation and fabrication guide from the Size, manufacturer or Neolith.

Here is a link that might be useful: Installation and fabrication guide


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Ready for sticker shock in Baltimore? I got a call back from Granix today, company found on the Neolith website. Neolith installed as wall panels is $175 psf. To add mitering for a counter installation they are estimating $300 plus psf. Sheesh.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

LARemodel--that's great info! Thanks for posting the detailed info.

With respect to "it doesn't chip, it's not laminated" -- neither is granite, but it can chip. I guess I will wait to see when there actually is decently-sized installed base of kitchens and we see feedback.

I think--for me--waiting on this until the next time it's time to remodel will allow for 1) prices to drop from the stratosphere and 2) give them time to do some more R&D to make a less costly version that's countertop ready.

But it's a nice, reasonable, option for wall cladding.

If you end up doing it in your bathroom you will have to post pics. I still think it's looks great, even the faux stone one--and I usually don't like things that try to very closely imitate granites or marbles.

This post was edited by ChrisInSD on Fri, Jun 20, 14 at 0:34


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

I am in the early stages of planning my bathroom remodel - it may be several months before I have pics. Two years ago, I made the mistake of agreeing to start demolishing my kitchen before I had decided what was going in there. It was well over six months before I had a working kitchen.

To answer the question about Neolith's "structural integrity," I'm not a materials engineer, but my understanding of the Neolith product is that it is a ceramic veneer with a fiberglass mesh backing. Without the fiberglass, it would easily break, either in transportation, fabrication, or in the installation process. OTOH, Fiandre (Stone Peak) has developed a process to make thin porcelain slabs that meet strength tests without needing a fiberglass backing.

As thin porcelain slabs are a relatively new product for residential use, I still have a lot of unanswered questions. I don't know if there is an extra cost in preparing the walls and floor to be "flat" before installation. Conventional porcelain tiles are more forgiving in this respect.

I agree with many of you who prefer engineered materials that don't try to imitate nature. But if you look at the porcelain products currently on the market, most of them are inspired by other materials, such as marble, limestone, wood, slate, and stained concrete.

The house I grew up in had a Formica kitchen countertop in a pastel paisley pattern - I wonder if it's time to bring that back?

Here is a link that might be useful: Stone Peak Plane data sheet


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

Well, the way I understand the Neolith 3+3 or 5=3, etc, are laminated. The 12mm or 1 cm are not.
Also, the slabs come with or without fiberglass backing. For counters,they are used without fiberglass backing.
See below for what type to be used for what purpose.

Here is a link that might be useful: info sheet


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

So I went to check out the neolith slabs today. Overall I didn't like them and will not be choosing them for my countertop. I thought the Estatuario was the best of the bunch and may be a good trade off for some in terms of resilence and price. THere was also a brown one that looked ok and one that tried to mimic concrete (I think). I thought the other colors/types were pretty awful (but that is just one girl's opinion). I didn't like the texture of the material (even the ones that are not textured) and its certainly not cool to the touch. Its also kind of shiny, which is not the look I am going for and i think made it look cheap.
In terms of cost, they said that with fabrication it comes in around the same as lower priced stones (I'm in NYC metro area). They've sold it to a few people for kitchen counter uses and are convinced that in the next year they won't be able to keep the estatuario in stock. Guess we will see.

Good luck to you all in your kitchen countertop hunt...


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

West coast folks, can someone please provide the slab yard that stocks neolith estutario? The contact for the fabricator would also be great. Thank you.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

West coast where? It's a loooong coast. (-;

I can help if you're in the Portland/Vancouver area but not elsewhere.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

NorCal bay area here and All Natural Stone in Burlingame has Neolith.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

In Southern California, there's a slab yard in North Hollywood that carries Neolith.

I have not seen the Neolith. Instead, I have been considering Stone Peak Plane, which is available at Bedrosian's in Orange, CA and at Royal Stone in West LA.


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RE: All I Can Say About Neolith is WOW!!!

the website for neolith (the size) lists the distributors.


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