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Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Posted by marcolo (My Page) on
Mon, Nov 7, 11 at 20:30

As was suggested in the last thread, we're going to take turns launching new "Design Around This" threads. We've agreed, more or less, that the next few projects should be Colonial Revival; Tuscan Redux; and Frenchy/Old Worldy Something.

It's my turn now.

Last time we picked one element to design around. This time, I'm picking a house to design in: A middle-class colonial revival house built anytime between around 1920 and today. It's been one of the most quintessentially American house styles since the 1870s. Here are some examples:




Inside they were often furnished in the "Early American" style, like this:

Or in a pseudo Georgian style like this:

Or in any random style the current owner liked. These are, probably more than any other style, "regular" American houses.

Your mission: Using photos of design elements, create a design concept or "mood board" for a kitchen in a colonial revival house that is


  • Unique. Not the same old thing we see every day. Combine things in unexpected ways. Rethink what it means to be Colonial Revival. What is the point of that look? What feeling is it supposed to evoke? What else does it suggest to you? Maybe start by looking at the wider Colonial Revival movement in furniture and architecture. Or not, as you wish.

  • Cohesive. A complete scheme showing a bunch of different elements, like cabs, flooring, faucets.

  • Contextual. Make it fit and flow with the house style. Avoid creating something that looks like a stage set or something that fell off the back of a showroom truck. That does not mean it can't look newer than the house.

  • Revival, not period. In other words, not a room that looks exactly like it was built centuries before the house was. Something that was inspired by this look, not an actual slavish reproduction.

  • Realistic in budget. Design for your own budget, or maybe a little higher--not for some recently-deceased foreign dictator.

  • Transitional or modern. I debated this one. I am throwing it in here simply to egg you on to be more original. You can probably find a traditional version of this look available off the shelf with a three-second Google search. Just mix it up a little, is what I'm asking. You can certainly add traditional elements; just avoid using a whole kit.

REMEMBER TO INCLUDE:


  • Pictures, not just quick musings
  • A rationale--explain WHY you did what you did
  • ROUGHLY the era of the house you're imagining, if you think it's important; e.g., new build in TX, '20s house in the Northeast, etc.

Go.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

my mood board is a homage to the 1970s colonial revival I grew up in. It is my try at a modern spin of what my mom favored during that era. I start with a large table of reclaimed wood built by Jeff Soderberg. It is farm table like but it fits the primative colonial theme I am hoping to create.
Photobucket

the cabs are more for hinges, knobs and inset not color of wood. I would hope to match the reclaimed woods of the table for the cabs.
Photobucket

The counters would be pewter, I choose this material because I fondly remember my moms set of pewter colonial dishes.
Photobucket
I would also use brick in place of tile for a full wall backsplash and place a pizza oven in it, Kinda like the the one in the pewter pic above. The bricks would have a bit more clay red rather than yellows and browns with in them tho.
For floors I would use reclaimed wide plank wood but now I might have to much wood, but than again so did my mom's 1970s colonial too.
I am having trouble downloading pics tonight so, sorry but I will just verbally tell you the rest of the finishes. I Would like a farmhouse soapstone sink with a dark cast ironish faucet. And cliche lanterns for lighting.
I would add a grandfather clock to My room like this kitchen:)
Photobucket and a square braided rug.
Photobucket

Wow my kitchen mood board is quite sad and dull:( This is hard! How do you guys do it so quickly and well?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I'm imagining the suburban midwest version of a colonial house, built in about 2000. Here it is so you can imagine it, too!

Photobucket

Making it look "period" would just be silly in this neighborhood, so I tried to choose updated elements with a period vibe. Did that make any sense at all? I have no idea because I don't say things like that in real life.

I'm starting with white, inset, shaker-style cabinets for the kitchen perimeter. Not exactly unique, but I did it anyway. The island gets a different color, and it's Sherwin Williams granite peak. George Washington would have worn that color if he were really cool. The island gets beadboard for it's inset cabinet doors. All the countertops are statuary marble. The walls are painted a much paler shade of the island - Sherwin Williams quicksilver. I resisted the urge to paint them Revere Pewter! For the hardware, I tried pewter and ORB, but it wanted to be polished nickel. Do you like the cool wall-mount bridge faucet? The backsplash looks like beadboard, but it is porcelain tile. The floors are wide-plank hickory. The table and dining cabinet are walnut. Under the table is my favorite Dash and Albert indoor/outdoor rug.

So here it is. Does it work?

Photobucket


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I have a couple of ideas. This house, I picture as a new build in the South, where there seems to be slightly more trimwork than in the North but not as ornate as an old house. Although this could work as in an old house, too.

The idea here is that, instead of trashing the DR to make it part of the kitchen in a semi-open plan, I bring in traditional colonial DR elements into the kitchen. And just to pull out the rug from pal, I made it neutral! Ha.



I think this can be a pretty lush look but there's nothing high-end in price. You don't even need tile. The only expensive thing is the Bluestar I threw in for color, and I almost prefer it without the color anyway.


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asdf

UGH sorry.

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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Do they make Delft in beige tones like you've posted? I thought Delft was, by definition, bright blue ("delft blue", in fact). That could seriously clash with your mural and backsplash. Maybe I'm missing something... maybe you're OK with those colors together (being not-pal ... only maybe this means you've jumped to his/er side?)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

No, Delft is available in brown. That photo is from a manufacturer's site.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Ok tell the truth, did you make up this whole exercise because you wanted to show us the grisaille mural? It's wonderful. I love those tones that remind me of vintage postage.

Just like you cannot do fashion the second time around, I don't think you can do decor. Everyone hates their parents decor when they "grow up"and get to decorate themselves. So I think the geese will be a hard sell, as I would imagine the timing is such that a lot of people decorating today had that in Mom's kitchen.


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asdf

No, I found the grisaille after! What's so great is that it's paint, so it's pretty cheap and completely flexible.

The geese were the only image available in the brown. Other patterns are available.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

nobody likes their parents decor perhaps, but the white kitchen movement was fueled by wanting "gramma's kitchen" so our kids might do the colonial 70s theme with fond thoughts of their grandparents home, who knows?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I am at work and will post tonight. I don't know that people reject their mother's decor or dress unless it was topical trendy tacky

I know a number of people who "channel " their mother when it comes to dress and decor particularly if she had.taste.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I think a lot of people want their grandmother's kitchen. But I do think most people reject their parents' kitchen/home. If you grew up with a forest green kitchen with an oak table and a white tile insert, and spent years eating Cheerios there, my bet is that when you get your first place you will want to express yourself in a different direction. I think that is why 20somethings like MCM, but less 40 somethings do.

Pal, your Mom had great taste and, from what you have shared, was not terribly trendy. I knew you would take issue with my statement, but I stand by it. : )


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I too am having a beast of a time on this one. The 1970's caught me in the midst of pre- and adolescent angst, acne and alienation, so it's very difficult for me to re-envision it. But perhaps that's the intent of the entire exercise, eh?

The best I can do is Scando-Colonial, using BM's Color of the Year this year, Wythe Blue, as the basis for a red-white-blue scheme:


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I think, just like in behavior we all end up either rebelling or emulating our parents. I feel just as many people emulate as do reject. I have many of my parents pieces included in my decor so I am one who did emulate. Many of my 40 something friends do do MCM also. All be it they are my friends in the metro areas and often without children, not my mommy friends in the burbs, but it can go either way. many first home owners who want their grandmother's kitchen have grandparent who still have colonial kitchens. The white kitchens are their great grandmothers now.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Recapitulating 70's kitchens: shudder... the horror. Do they need to have those folding doors too? And the step-down split? Oh yuck ... and the smell? Oh, that bad smell of mold and other unmentionables.... I can't even look at the exterior of those houses without shuddering. Sorry....


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I sooo tried to do this exercise! I was having a hard time of it so I said to myself let's just start by finding something... anything I like and spring board off that. Zip! I couldn't find a light or a rug or anything I found remotely inspiring. Oh, I did find a modern version of a Windsor stool but that didn't help much. I did do some reading Marco so your exercise was not in vain. All I can think of is cabbage, I can even smell cabbage right now just thinking of this decor. Pewww, cabbage!


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Colonial Revival has never been particularly out of favor so it could relate to almost any decade of the 20th century.

There was a lot of good design in the 1970s but there does not seem to have been a lot of exposure to it. The building was typical of "high interested rate/high inflation" building --the materials and quality suffered.

Re grandmother vs. mother, I also forget that particularly of that generation although my parents were not quite old enough to be my grand parents--my dad is, I guess--I was a child of older parents. People always thought I was with my grandparents after I graduated from college or so, and even the last round of nursing home stays with my mother, people often referred to my mom as my grandmother. I guess if it's short enough, the gray in my hair doesn't really show.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Okay, this is my idea of a colonial revival kitchen...or at least what would be comfortable in that type of home.

These cabinets and hardware.

From Kitchen plans

This slate backsplash tile

From Kitchen plans

These beautiful green soapstone countertops

From Kitchen plans

This breakfast table and chairs...I even like the rug, with the soapstone countertops

From Kitchen plans

And these sconces

From Kitchen plans

I think this kitchen could work with black appliances, but the oil rubbed bronze would look cool with the backsplash...and the right shade of avacado green might even work with the soapstone. Not to be '70s', but I think those colors will become popular again :)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Well, I did colonial last time, so I'm going for a more eclectic look this time, albeit one that would fit in one of those houses where the rest of the rooms are much more traditional.

Cabs, layout and trim work:

Photobucket

More cabs (Crown Point pics):

Photobucket

Banquette seating:

Photobucket

Banquette and WT fabric (Brunschwig):

Photobucket

Versailles pattern white oak flooring:

Photobucket

Lavastone counters, probably in Safran:

Photobucket

Cabs painted C2 Kauai, which looks purple on the monitor and blue in the deck...

Photobucket

Walls painted in C2 Coconut, again, looks different on the monitor than the deck.

Photobucket

Campaign table:

Photobucket

Sink (Kohler):

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Faucet (Newport Brass, in gloss black):

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Lighting by Design Lush:

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Range hood (Modern Aire):

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I'm sure there a zillion other things I could include, but I'm designed out for now.

sandyponder


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Did anyone else notice, in Sandy's banquette photo, that there isn't enough room between the chairs and the table legs to actually sit there, or to get to the bench behind? (In no way should this be taken as a criticism of Sandy's vision; it's just a comment on the staging of the source photo.)

I'll see if I can find time to do my own design later.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

My concept is vernacular Colonial Revival, with more emphasis on the revival. My house is either a post-war house, or this could also be the first modern kitchen in a real 18th c. house which was being added as a back addition, piggybacked by a bathroom on all sorts of houses where I live in the 1960s during gentrification. I still think this would be an appropriate way to do this in 2011. The only thing that is not right off the shelf is the light fixture. There is also a runner but they are ubiquitous.

My overall concept is simple materials for a smallish eat-in kitchen, no full backsplash, and only a couple high end items, mixed with plainer stuff.

This sets the tone for the project:
Photobucket

Cabinet:Photobucket. Hardware:Photobucket

Laminate countertop:Photobucket

Backsplash behind range only: modern Delft tiles in the "Craft (Jobs) Tiles" series set as a splash.
PhotobucketPhotobucket
Big ticket range hood:Photobucket
Some butcher block:PhotobucketSink:Photobucket
Floor: Daltile Union Square:Photobucketwith runnerPhotobucket

And in the eating area to keep it from being too precious, modern furniture bases on older styles:

Photobucket Photobucket and maybe a wall of some paper:Photobucket


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I will overlook your stealing of a chair and some brick I was going to use in another treatment to say, wow, I love that color combination.

I want to point out that your mood board is what timeless actually looks like. I am pretty good at dating things, and if I walked into that kitchen, I'd have to look closely before picking a date between 1929 and 2011, with some of the elements possibly earlier.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Circuspeanut: What is the wallpaper you show in your post?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Well, I think one of the ways to do timeless is to use something that was used often and freely mix finishes, especially metal finishes. For most of the 20th century, it was a rare house that didn't have a shiny silver faucet in the kitchen. People had white sinks or stainless most of the time, too, no matter what everything else was. Copper or coppertone range hoods were omething I saw when I was little, but none of those people had a copper stove. The choices simply weren't there to match the way we do now.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

OK. This is the best I could come up w/ and I'm probably way off :)

cabinets. probably minus the odd arches in the glass doors, but not sure:
25728caeff4a

Pie safe will be used somewhere:
piechest

Counters like these:

Hardware:

Faucet


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Actually beagles the inside of the house your are building is mostly colonial revival in terms of the millwork.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

::: clearing throat :::

I'm designing for the second home, which I see as less formal. Really just because I want an excuse to use the brick-edged wooden floor. I think it is too rustic for the other homes.

I chose the chandy, which to me is evocative of a wagon wheel because of the rivets, and for the brick color. I think wallpaper has been banished for too long and would work well here, something Wm Morris but his lighter stuff.
I cant see a slick counter, and am so tired of the usual suspects. I chose 6" square tile. I wanted more of a butter color, this may be too strong with the celery cabs. Finally I liked the delicate lines of the windsor chairs.

Photobucket


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question

Really. I didn't know that (showing ignorance here). Not to hijack, but I am curious what makes my house colonial revival?


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RE:re Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Pal, your runner does such a great job of pulling the colors together. I really love those worn old rugs with the softened colors but i have trouble finding them.

PS HI Beagles -- ive seen that kitchen before. I remember liking it then, too!


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I'm in so far over my head here.... looking at all these different ideas... all I can think of is posting various pics of my own home and asking, "what's my style???" (My house is one of those dime-a-dozen, suburban center hall colonials built in the 80's) I **think** I tend to decorate comfy traditional in living areas, and not overdone/classic traditional in the more formal areas. (a leeetle bit fussy, but not much) who knows.

I guess I know what I like. I know what is comfortable for me. I certainly bow to picking things dh likes as well....

Perhaps when it's time for me to actually DO the kitchen I have planned in my head, I should post the pics of the rooms around my house - as important as having materials etc. that I like, perhaps even more important for me, is to have a kitchen that looks like it BELONGS there.

anyway. return to regular programming... just a tad sidebar from someone who is nearly all about function, enjoys form - but knows nothing...


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Beagles - would it seem more Georgian to you? Because colonial revival is basically neo-Georgian.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

mtnrdredux, I am seething with envy that you were able to identify and locate two elements I've been looking for to create my next mood board--a modern update to wagon-wheel chandeliers, and a new way to incorporate brick!

I've been looking for elements to reflect a modern Mad Men kitchen without relying too much on midcentury, and it's hard. There were some common features in a lot of colonial revival kitchens across the whole twentieth century: Lots of wood. Feminine details like scalloped edges. Brick. Slab doors. Wallpaper. Captains chairs. To me, these were the quintessential elements of the colonial revival as the "regular" American house, the one everybody had.


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RE: re Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I'm feeling very proud now and can go to sleep!

And did you have to mention Mad Men? I started watching Mad Men on my ipad last year. I cannot remember the last time i actually followed a show, let alone had a crush on an actor. But the design was such a hoot too. Plaid thermoses. Lanz nightgowns. Contact paper on the shelves! I am so glad to hear they are filming again.

I own the chairs below which really dont go on so many levels, but I love them. I think of them as my Mad Men chairs. My DH was sitting in one at the store while I was buying a sectional and he fell in love with the ergonomics. I envisioned them in Jon Hamm's office, not far from the credenza bar, and ...

Here is a link that might be useful: Mad Men madness


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I liked circuspeanut's red, white and blue motif and started to riff on that. Somewhere I went astray...

And I threw in some modern elements for Marcolo. Otherwise it would have been soapstone.






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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

ncamy, re. wallpaper: I so hate to confess, but I can't recall. It was googled a while back and I have no reference. If it jumps back at me I'll send you a quick note.

---

Cawaps, I love the vague "to the pillory with thee" feel of the hanging pot rack, perfect! I'm also glad someone threw in a colored range.

Although, come to think of it, a Bicentennial decor may be the only design scheme on earth that would actually justify those honkin' big red Wolf knobs.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

For Marcolo, modern updates to wagon wheel chandeliers (all with bicycle wheels).

This one uses plastic coat hangers as well:

Spoons:


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

OK, I know this is a very loose interpretation but I can't just give up. I started with this wall in pine (pretend) with no upper cabinets, just shelves. Pretend it has this chandelier and some type of window treatment out of this fabric.


I decided on avocado Formica countertops with a green salvaged avocado sink and this horse faucet because my inspiration house is out in the country.



I'm going to put this salvaged harvest gold tile behind the range and up to range hood "only". The rest of the walls will remain pine.



This is what the bottom cabinets look like, sort of a burgundy red. The floor is pine and I'm using these recycled knobs.






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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I am trying to put together another board related to this thread about Mad Men and Colonials but it's a busy week. And it's really a challenge to find things that evoke the feeling of that look without actually going totally midcentury, isn't it?

The thing is, it's not originally a midcentury look at all. This famous Early American look kitchen was designed by one of America's first interior designers during World War I. Let's see if this shows up.


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asdf

Of course.

Anway, find the pic here.

Here is a link that might be useful: Click on Pine Kitchen


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I purposely added the avocado and other colors for a spin. It's really almost impossible for me not to put a spin on certain styles or not think of re-purposing. My brain has been trained through garage sale buying for so long lol.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

marcolo, here's your Pine Kitchen. (You need to put into the URL everywhere the original has a blank space. Otherwise this fabulous c. 1996 GW forum software will choke on it. This one ferinstance is "blablah/Beauport/photographic-tour/Pine Kitchen/image"

Now that's some pine!


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percentagesigntwenty

oh ferpetesakes, it did it to me too, ignoring my code tags. Shades of Geocities, this place. Type this: everywhere there's a blank in the URL.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

OK--my knotty-pine, sorta midcentury Early American inspired kitchen.
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Photobucket


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Marco I really like those cabinets. I like those cabinets and color alot, have not seen that in any mags which makes them even more appealing.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Hey! I have washed turquoise beadboard in my glass cabinets!


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what?

Well I know you are dying to show it mt and I am dying to see it. So just post a little ole picture and lets have a looky. Maybe if its little Marco will be ok with it on this thread?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Just a peek--but no hijacking! And no 200 comments with kitchen reveal oohs and aahs!

Is anyone else going to take a stab, or should we open the discussion group? ;)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

You know I'd love to hijack with a big honkin' photo. Or seven. And paragraphs of extraneous details about my inspiration, all its iterations, the procural process, overseeing the craftsmen, installation, and then an inventory of which china items look best against my washed beadboard.

But lucky you photobucket is not working.

I am too tired to discuss but carry on!


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

19th c. hutch in the forthcoming sale at Freeman's Auction.

Photobucket

How do we discuss?

I think one thing we could do in a future "period" or "style" exercise is have the poster identify what items are period specific and what items are not. In this revival set, besides the obvious modern touches are Craftsman, Aesthetic, French, Edwardian designs or influences and that's fine, if you know that that's what you are doing. But sometimes I think people have a hard time putting things together because they don't know exactly what they are looking at, and what may separate what they find from something that they would Really like, if they knew how to look for it.

I have a design colleague who had a client become increasingly annoyed with him for showing her "all this furniture that is completely wrong". The problem was that she Thought she liked French 19th c. furniture and that's what she said, but what she really liked was English 19th c. furniture--she just didn't know it.


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RE:re Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

The mirror image scalloping is quite interesting on that hutch. I've either not seen or not noticed that detail before.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Palimpsest,

What I knew about Colonial Revival before this exercise was about nil (I'm on the west coast, and I don't think there is a Colonial Revival home in all of Oakland), and my knowledge has now only reached the Wikipedia level. So I, and probably many of our players, were not working from a great knowledge base of design history. I definitely don't "know what I'm doing."

I took Marcolo's excercise to be, what would I, as a modern homeowner, put in this house. He said: "Rethink what it means to be Colonial Revival. What is the point of that look? What feeling is it supposed to evoke? What else does it suggest to you? Maybe start by looking at the wider Colonial Revival movement in furniture and architecture. Or not, as you wish." I fell in the "or not" camp, except for the Wikipedia thing.

If the excercise is to do something truly period (and I didn't think this one was), I would probably bow out due to sheer ignorance.

I would appreciate some (gentle but honest) feedback from the design experts in the group on my own attempt. Both in terms of how the interpretation met the parameters of the exercise and in terms of do these elements hold together.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

How do we discuss?

Who, us? Same way we do in the other 66 pages of threads on this forum!

I think the identification idea is an excellent one.

So, to discuss--

First, I think anybody who wants a critique of their specific design should ask for one. Feel free to shoot away at mine.

Second, I can't get over the relative ease with which people can put together cohesive and context-sensitive design in these threads, contrasted with the fact that most people on this board never do it. I do think these threads will help, especially if new posters are directed and linked to them. But right at this moment, there are people on the forum clawing for help in design direction--and all they're actually thinking of doing is in infinitesimally small variation on the One True Kitchen. Which is probably going into a '70s raised ranch.

Third, I think it would help people design their spaces if they practiced basic principles of brainstorming and elimination. We see the same kitchen over and over partly because people never, ever take a moment to explore other options.

Finally, the other reason we usually see the same kitchens is because that's what's made. You can't buy a monel counter. It was no mean feat to find a modern light fixture that looks Early American (it's actually more modern looking when you can actually see it--so much for converting from Word to PDF to JPEG, but anyway). But Google "white kitchen" and you get jillions of hits.

This thread has got me thinking. I'm in a '20s colonial and really want a truly '20s kitchen. But it is sort of tempting to try some of these other themes.


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This IS easier

It's easy to put together a hypothetical design combination that you won't ever have to live with. There's no risk so it's easy to be daring. Committing to linking a photo is nothing like committing to installing red cabinets. I can put together 10 different design concepts if I want to, but I can only do my own kitchen once. Gotta get it right the first time--the fear factor is much higher.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

My classic 1970 "Colonial Ranch" came with cheap pine plywood cabinets stained walnut, cream Formica counters, an actual made by Hobart Kitchenaid dishwasher (almond), stainless cooktop and oven (yes from 1970) and blue wallpaper everywhere. Taking inspiration from that....

A modern interpretation of classic raised panel walnut cabinets in maple stained walnut for those on a budget, Formica Flax Gauze counters

Cream drop in sink with drainboard

Barn red island with walnut and cherry checkerboard butcherblock counters


Tropical Postcards Wallpaper, a couple of these copper semi flush lantern fixtures

Aged copper knobs and pulls

Bisque appliances, yes, they still make them,

In a twist on the classic cream vinyl floor---a cream cork floor

Cream painted gateleg table

Modern walnut Windsor chairs

Classic Brass Chandy

Instead of the classic braided rag rug, a horizontal Moroccan rag rug

This is attempted as a "budget" kitchen with a few splurges like the island counters and the floor. You can find a lot of these items on Craigslist now from homes being "updated". There was a gateleg table exactly like my example (unpainted) for $200 the other day, and a similar chandy went for $30. Rag rugs are great recycled elements that are inexpensive and durable. There was a whole kitchen of bisque appliances on Craigslist as well.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

BTW, this is the first I've had enought time to tackle this exercise, and I did it without looking at other's contributions until I did mine. It's interesting that many of us went with red as an inspiration color and used the simple lines of a wWindsor chair for seating. Loving the brass and darker metals as well as the wallpaper--all hallmarks of actual Colonial style.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I love this thread and have super enjoyed everyone's ideas;
but I just haven't had the time to participate.
If the thread stays open until the weekend,
I'm going to try to design a 1950s Colonial Revival kitchen around these "Dalloway" chairs:

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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I agree Cawaps; in design around this #1 I used Apple Jasper, which I would not commit to in real life--but mostly because I won't ever have that type of house.

But what I think Marcolo is talking about is that people agonize over choices and some of them still get it wrong (non-correlated neutrals) and a lot of them end up with the safest possible choice, which could have been made in a day or so.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I totally agree that we are limited by what is available to buy (and what our local contractors know how to do). I really wanted to use a light turquoise blue linen formica in my new kitchen. I particularly loved the idea of pairing it with other very high end elements. But I looked and looked and it is not made. I could have had i custom made for some absurd price. Meaning more than hand hewn cherry.

Trends are insidious. People who make their living selling us stuff are constantly tweaking, conspiring to make anything we already own look bad. Even when you think you are choosing timeless, in short order you see a new riff on it.

As far as the " infinitesimally small variation on the One True Kitchen", i give everyone a pass. Marketers spend a lot of time and money making us want THAT particular kitchen, and surprise, we do. And so do a lot of our friends and potential homebuyers. You can amuse yourself all you want with more creative things, but with rare exceptions it won't get you the "wow" a lot of people want. Personally i like to have a home where some people might say "what was she thinking" rather than one that is pure copycat. But I don't know that a lot of folks feel that way.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Good design is the only safe choice. It's the one and only thing that endures and looks good after trends pass. Someone recently linked to messages from a few years ago where posters were advised to stick with a "safe" and "classic" and "timeless" backsplash--tumbled marble. Ooops. In the early zeroes, at the beginning of the boom, the classic flip kitchen was Pergranteel--light maples cabs, polished AB granite, Pergo floors, stainless appliances. That look became passe before the boom was even over; it literally took just a couple of years. In looking at houses and apartments a couple of years ago, I saw many kitchens done in medium wood tones and cheap beige tiles of a few years ago; the primary feeling wasn't "neutral" so much as sad.

The point I'm making is good design is an imperative, whether your color scheme is bold or neutral. And neutral does not offer an easy alternative to good design.

Second, I agree, it's easy and painless to put together these boards. So why don't people do it? It costs nothing to explore options. Every creative endeavor starts with brainstorming--playing with all sorts of ideas, no holds barred, then eliminating those that don't work. But instead of doing it, people become paralyzed by fear before they even try to imagine the possibilities.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I think never before in history have so many of us been so contradictory. Somehow or another we have been programmed to be sooo kind and considerate as to decorate for some unknown person who may buy our house in the future. Yet, aren't we supposed to be the me me me generation? Its funny how although people were flying high feeling real estate rich in the mid 2000's the color schemes were closer to the 30's depression era. And, now that we are feeling the bad result of the flying high days we want more and more color. It's the opposite of what has happened in history.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Francoise47's chairs would look great in Marcolo's kitchen from Wednesday at 19:47.

I've got a notion for the next Design Around This thread, based on a specific material. Is anyone slated to pick the next topic?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I think pal had mentioned alternating between materials and styles as subjects. I think it's best if the materials aren't completely unrealistic and out there, though they certainly should be off the beaten path for the endless same same mainstream. pal? Thoughts?

Also we do need to make sure that before the game eventually peters out, we do get to Tuscan and old world, since those are things people struggle to update. But that doesn't necessarily mean they have to be the next installment.

What about critiquing these boards? I'm asking for comments and debate on mine right now. Anyone else?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Marco, I still love your cabinets but am open to you critiquing mine...you can be harch if you want to :)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Comments on Marcolo's board,s, 1 and 2.

Board 1
Unique. - i thought the mural was unique. It also takes advantage of new technology, a plus. I like the overall palette, but it is not a unique palette, it is today's most popular palette.
Cohesive. Yes
Contextual. Yes
Revival, Yes
Realistic in budget. Appears to be so

Board 2
Unique. - I dont think the chairs work -- they can be the "kick",but I just feel they are out of place. The color palette, a watered down tribute to HoJo, I like. Hermes has rehabilitated orange. Not sure about two papers AND a fabric. I like the floral with plaid but its a little Buatta
Cohesive. Yes
Contextual. Yes
Revival, Yes
Realistic in budget.Those cabs would be very pricey. Custom, and then with a special finish. The formica counters would offset, but I cannot imagine someone putting formica on such pricey cabs. Problem w formica is it looks like an office pantry.

I love board 1. I really liked the cabs and floral wall paper in board 2.


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asdf

mtnrdedux,

Board 1. You are 100% right that the palette is not unique. I started off in a different direction, originally looking for regular mural wallpaper and found that piece of genius, so I pivoted.

If I may be so bold, though, I think that board shows a better way to use neutrals than we often see in kitchens. Most people not only choose neutral colors, but make the most tight-***ed decisions about every material at every step. The most conservative countertops. The most been-there-done-that light fixtures. Then they return to the board asking how to add life to their dull spaces.

This use of neutral falls into "it's a cheap trick but it works" category. The style of the mural and the full commitment to neo Georgian is a bit out of the mainstream, and can look a little grandmotherly. Here a neutral palette is almost a just-add-water way to freshen it and pull it together. At least, that was my intention.

Board 2. "watered-down HoJo" LOL!

Cabs like that are available at Amish Loft and a few other places. I don't think they are top of the line price wise. I think the barn-y look is more common in some parts of the country.

I'm crestfallen you don't like my chairs! They remind me of chairs my mom had, albeit in traditional captain's style, pulled up around a wood-grain formica-topped table! I think adding more modern, eclectic items might help. Right now the chandelier (which does look more modern up close) and the wallpaper are the two punches of dissonance. I think the room needs more.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Mtnredux, right now if you want an interesting non-natural look laminate or vinyl flooring you are really limited, or out-of-luck. The prospects are improving with some linen-look ceramic and vinyl fabric look tiles becoming more available, and some fabric and fiber look laminates:
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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Feel free to critique mine. ;) I promise my feelings won't be hurt when you tell me it's low on the unique scale. I already know that. I'll blame it on the lateness of the hour after the longness of the day. However, I also know it will be high on the "use of budget" scale, because that's a lot of what my design style is about.

I think my island counter tries too hard and fails. It should have been a solid wood. I like the wallpaper and rug for the pattern and color even though it's not perfectly on pitch and is a little flat in creativity. And I LOVE the chandy, table and chairs, no matter what anyone says about them! :)

My favorite thing in the whole thread is the plastic coat hanger chandelier. That is SO outside of the box in a great way!


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Hello, can someone critique my kitchen? I'm trying to learn something here lol. I know it's a very loose interpretation but I would like help explaining what it was I did or didn't do. I had a hard time of it because I kept smelling cabbage. So, I did a loose interpretation of Aunt Jane's kitchen (smelled of cabbage and rutabagas). Hers was a sort of colonial but she had one of those double decker ranges with connected oven or micro on top (?) What year did microwaves show up in kitchens? Anyway, hers was that browny red color. This was in the late sixties early seventies and was a mix of time frame colonial style furniture. I tried to take that idea and give it some style in a sort of Ellie May Clampet buys her first country home for her and her critters and does it up real fancy like.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Pal's kitchen.

Unique. - I like what i would call "distressed delft". It takes the current distressed fad and applies it to a style that is out of date. Together, they work. I also like the lighter feel achieved with the marimekkoesque wallpaper and blonde wood
Cohesive. I liked the way you brought red blue and yellow together.
Contextual. Yes
Revival, Yes. The floor is perfect, and where did you find the chandy? I havent seen that look in so long but it is spot on with that american eagle, fife and drum look.
Realistic in budget. I dont think you will find that rug at Homegoods. Otherwise, yes.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I'm not retyping the post the forum ate until it proves this one goes through.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Here is a stab at a somewhat fusty Colonial Revival kitchen
for a house built in the 1920.
It has a few modern, popish interpretations of Colonial Revival
(such as the colorful rag rug from Dash and Albert
and the bright yellow "Dalloway" chair from Anthropologie.)

The Dalloway chair was actually the inspiration.
I wanted a warm and inviting kitchen that Clarissa Dalloway
might have felt comfortable in in the 1920s.

The trestle table is a reproduction made by D.R. Dimes.
At 60" by 34" it would be perfect for the middle of the kitchen,
replacing an island which might look out of place in this kitchen.

The lights are from the Preservation Station website and are
antique Lightolier pendants selling for 475 dollars for the pair.

I'd like the cabinets to be a warm, buttercream yellow painted wood
(paler than the Dalloway chair).
The little inset picture of the kitchen with the yellow cabinets is meant to show the feel I'm trying to achieve.
(Plus, I always loved that kitchen.)
But I would swap the table for the island.

I threw in the Ikea white Stat cabinets as a second best, low cost alternative to painted wood.
They could be spray lacquered a pale yellow.

A board and batten treatment on the walls would look nice.
Soapstone or wood counters.

The turkey napkins -- yes, a "colonial" gimmick --
are from the British company Thornback and Peel.

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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Jterrilynn- IMHO, and it's just my opinion...neutrals have been so popular for three reasons.

First, as you said, the housing boom. Our homes became investments and even quick cash flips, not necessarily places where we planned to put down roots for decades. Between career changes and skyrocketing home prices, it was 'safer' to decorate so that the house could be put on the market, at a moment's notice. So...it needs to appeal to as many people, as possible.

Second, for some reason I think a lot of people have become overly concerned about what everyone else thinks about their choices. Keeping up with the Joneses takes on a whole new meaning when the neighborhood and type of home is not enough...now the insides need to be 'right' too. No room for independent thought or crazy ideas, since others might not understand or appreciate these choices. I know some will disagree with me, but as I said, this is just my opinion.

Third, many people just don't feel confident with their design choices. Partly because of reason #2 and partly because of all the home decorating shows...and the vast number of choices that are available. They seem to be overwhelming, until you realize you still can't find many things you're looking for, if you do decide to go outside the norm. Also, as I believe Marcolo stated...just try to google something that hasn't been popular in the last few years. It's almost impossible to come up with different ideas, unless you're willing to leave the computer and go to the library and do some additional research.

As for my kitchen, feel free to comment...but I actually would like to know what you thought about the plum AGA in the other post :)


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Oops!

Yikes! I'd like to apologize for not taking the time to proofread more carefully! That should NOT say 'neutrals are so popular for three reasons'...it should say 'designing to please others is so popular for three reasons'! My point was about why people design to please others...so sorry to all those who love neutrals.

Neutrals are an obvious choice when you're designing for mass appeal, but that doesn't mean everyone who likes neutrals does so for that reason. I really should drink caffeine, BEFORE I decide to type a rant (said with cup of tea now in hand).


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I wrote a long post for jterrilynn but it was eaten.

Shorter: I'm having trouble reconciling the delicate, feminine chandelier with the bold high contrast color blocks of the tile, cabs, counter and wood. Balancing feminine and masculine in the same room is great. But I'm seeing those two elements as things that should be spotlighted, almost like rococo paintings in an ultramodern art gallery, unless you're going whole hog girly.

francoise, I like the way those elements say colonial revival but they are not originally kitchen elements.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Thanks Marco, that chandelier was bugging me a bit for the mix as well. In my mind I was thinking it could work if the harvest gold yellow tile just looked sort of like another texture on the yellow pine walls...kind of blending in of the same the color family so the white with red light would stand out in a good way when mixed with the curtains done in the (to me) more feminine fabric. I should have added some accessories in white on the lower half for further blending. I'm going to keep taking risks on mixing in these exercises though and am prepared to take the heat. In order to be original with wild spins on things I've much to learn but I think I can do it.

Lavender, I'm no good at critiquing but I do love the eggplant color.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Oh, that aubergine was fabulous.

YES, take wild leaps, jterrilynn. This is supposed to be an initial step--brainstorm, then eliminate and edit. You're doing the right thing!

I didn't dislike the chandelier or fabric one bit. But they seemed to represent a competing vision from the other elements. Actually trying to resurrect 70s colors and tiles is already a big, bold, attention getting move, and doing it with big contrasting color blocks threatens to crush little delicate patterns like that.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Marco, now there's a good idea for a topic! An exercise in mixing feminine, masculine and color blocks. Now you have me thinking, I should have painted the ceiling a color in my post. This is what I do to myself, I always think there is some way to make something work and I nearly go nuts trying to solve the puzzle without taking out the thing that isn't right.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I really like the fixtures in Francoise's scheme.

Mtnredux, the tole lamp is French 1920s and @ 1st Dibs. It's $1500 there, but I think you could get something by following eBay. My parents' kitchen has a tole chandelier with one large metal shade, more like a bouillotte, and it came copper painted, got customized in black and white and further updated in green and white, so this is something that although you don't see it a lot, they are out there and you can paint them to suit.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I'm getting a serious crisis of vision about my remodel. I was extremely committed to true '20s, touches of very early Deco (more delicate than '30s Deco). However, these sorts of folksy kitchens are also extremely authentic for the '20s, and they've giving me pause.

Looking back at some of these designs, I think anachronism is really important. I can't think of any example of any room done in earlier decades that still reads as timeless that doesn't have some--not all, but some--antiques.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Pal,

Thanks for the info about the tole lamp. I love 1st dibs, but you sure do pay up for for being "1st'.

My house is pretty much done so I have abandoned my hunt for laminate counters. I wouldnt want laminate floors in my kitchen because it has a five openings into other rooms, all but one of which is wide plank so we used it in the kitchen too.

Marcolo,
I don't think the neutral kitchen crowd does come hear to complain and ask for how to add color. I think they love their kitchens and their kitchens are loved, for the most part.

Your are rethinking your vision for a real life kitchen? Or this exercise? I did not know you had a kitchen. I thought you were just a roving advisor, hired by the people advertising right over there -------> And up there ^
In fact, I thought you might be a few different people, a whole staff, thrown in here to keep us going, but kept in a sort of design biosphere so that we can always hear from you, 24/7.

Here is a link that might be useful: the counters i wanted


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Those were countertop materials I posted. The third one would have been close to the right color, the first one the right...density, I think.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

mtnrdredux,

Slightly off topic, I love your theory about Marcolo.
Perhaps this thread, linked below about his kitchen, was just meant to throw us all off?!
I've often wondered how many people on GW have multiple personas on GW.
Hmmm... food for thought.

Anyway, tt was a fun thread back in 2010 and it had the feel of verisimilitude.
So much so that I have been wondering all these months how Marcolo's 1920s kitchen plans were evolving.

Here is a link that might be useful: Marcolo's 1920s kitchen design challenge


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Boo all the images are gone!


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who are you

MT, I always thought you were really Michelle Obama lol.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Gee, I thought this thread had a very good vibe going.

Anyone who seems to have read so many of my posts really ought to know my story already. This forum has great advice but sometimes you really have to have a strong tolerance for meowing.


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will the real marco please stand up please stand up

Now marcolo it's all good! Like decorating sometimes there just has to be a bit of jesting for fun.


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RE: who are you?

Part time curmudgeon part-time go-go dancer? Or is that me?

Or maybe more like Dawn Davenport:
Photobucket
"I'm a liar, a thief, and a real 5h!tkicker."

Anyway, what's next? Something a bit more restricted or structured?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

No, Marcolo, I actually literally meant that I did not know you were redoing a kitchen. I think it must have been a long time since you talked about your plans. I do remember you saying things like "ive always wanted to do a such and such kitchen" (chinoisereie, was one). But I had no idea you were working on plans.

I went back to the link, and alas, no more pictures!

Have you posted before about a mood board for the 20s deco kitchen? That sounds very interesting.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

oooh, that was worth revisiting, if only for the best. gardenweb. picture. ever:


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dead

Haha, pal you can't be he's dead.


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RE: Leavin' on a Jet Plane.

Hey, I will be at a meeting for 5 days starting tomorrow, and I am not taking my laptop. I may be able to check in but I won't be able to play :( Don't do anything fun until I get back :P


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I loved the Kitchen Hoplite. If anyone knows where to order one online, please link.

mtnrdredux, I've told my tale of woe a few times. Short version: We thought we'd be able to start our kitchen reno even before moving in. Reality intruded, and we've been throwing money at it in multiple unexpected $10K chunks ever since. I now fear my kitchen is unfixable in its footprint without a bumpout, but I'm not sure my house will support the expense of an addition. I have stumped the very best, including buehl and johnliu.

Dammit, pal! Why didn't you tell us earlier you were leaving? We need your guidance in choosing the next project.

And how did you ever get that picture of me on a Sunday morning?

I do want to point out that was the exact getup my mother adopted for bedtime to preserve her '60s up-do when I was little. I am the youngest in my family. Figure it out.


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RE: re Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Pal.

You mean next for this thread? Should we stick with Marcolo's paradigm about how to discuss them (eh uniqueness, cohesiveness, etc).

Francoise, since I dont have to scroll up too far:
Unique. - I am very happy about your table and banishment of the island. It is refreshing. I would have done that but since I had a mega galley I couldnt really go that direction. I also like the table with those chairs. It makes me look back at the table Pal put with the Dollaways, and now that table looks like mdf bases for those BedBathnBeyond sidetables people cover over? The rug is also a great choice. Kitchens need more rugs, and I'm all about D&A. I would like the lights better without the pasties/tassels. I love the napkins and am going forthwith to look that co. up.
Cohesive. Yes
Contextual. Yes
Revival, Yes
Realistic in budget. I suppose so.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Ok pal, but it looks like you are going to miss out on Marco's S&M outfits.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Oh no, Pal. We need to wait then. We need to be fully staffed for this.

Ok, Marcolo, I don't think I knew that. And I know I never saw that layout before!


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RE: hoplite

Is that for towels, like the ever popular kitchen pig?

Scale may be wrong.

But I think it would be a great image for laser cut tumbled marble backsplash.


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asdf

I had such high hopes for this thread, and yet it all ended with me looking at Divine's high school picture on Wikipedia while rewatching "I'm So Beautiful" on Youtube.

Such are the best-laid schemes of mice and men.


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RE: rere Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Hey, I did my part. I read your instructions contributed, and then commented on four other mood boards using your criteria.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

No, you were well-behaved. Then pal had to post that damn picture. Memory lane has many on-ramps.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I've never posted anything like this. So, bear with me. The house I'm thinking of is probably more recent than others. Maybe even closer to the scary 70's center halls that I'm very used to seeing. I live in the midwest. Most of the houses in my neighborhood are this style. I'm a middle 30s stay at home mom on a budget. I want to update my home and not have the chickens or farm animals on my walls. There are tons and tons of trees in my neighborhood. So, green is prevalent in my situation.

I'm showing the kitchen so you can see the dark gray next to the white tops. I know. Gray. But, I picked a heritage color from BM. Been around forever and has a green undertone. The lighter gray is revere pewter for the walls.

I'm pulling my scenario mostly from a fabric. It's close to a fabric that I have with the same colors. It's more of an oriental than a floral. But, I would use hot house in a red hot minute. I'm just too lazy to photo my fabric. But, I have been considering this fabric forever. Was thinking the extra seating would be in this. And, the shade in the kitchen.

Cabs: raised painted, uppers in pointing, lowers in chelsea gray or pigeon by FB.

Tiles: Cheap, cheap anne sacks- nine dollars a sf. Not the super small mosaic or the normal subway. I think that they are three inches long. Really want to do a herringbone subway pattern, but was trying to bring a little more color.

Countertops: corian (yes. corian) in cameo white. I like the soft and not shiny look to it.

Finishes: are in polished nickel as I'm trying to bounce light which seems to be nil in homes like these. The chandelier's shades are glass. Not in love with those. Was thinking more traditional silk or something like that.

Curtains: Could be ivory or linen with the orange trim. (must have orange trim as I'm trying to pull in the orange of the red oak floors that everyone has here.) And, they have to the valance.

Chairs: Must have queen anne around here. Of course, the green isn't perfect. But, I want something similar, but probably skinnier and taller... with the nailhead trim. This would be the two captain chairs.

The tall hutch is more farmhouse. But, I love the height. And, the color is right for the dark, dark trim you see around here. I'm trying to honor that color. Mind you, I would want the trim and the moulding in pointing still.

I know that my scenario is more in depth than the other posters. Probably, since this is similar to what I'm doing with my home. It's about 2:00 here. Haven't figured out how to post this board. So, you'll have to click on the link. :) Oops, I realized I forgot to find a pull and I wanted to paint the interior doors a glossy black or the chelsea gray. Sorry about that.

I was trying not to be the zig zag rug blogger in my kitchen. But, it definitely leans more that way could be my age. BTW, I do like zig zag rugs. But, was trying to be more traditional.

Thanks!

Here is a link that might be useful: Colonial


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Here you go.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Marcolo- No chance of opening the kitchen to another room?

Kimiko- I like your kitchen colors a lot...just wondering if an antique brass would work better than the chrome/nickel? I love that silver tray...there should be one in every kitchen :)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Celerie Kembel's "Hot House Flowers" is not Asian, though it sort of looks that way. It's a Jacobean print, which was originally based on 17th century crewel work. However it is a very classic traditional print. It actually has a bit more green than you can see in the little thumbnail.

It actually comes in a green colorway.

I would also lean toward brass in that concept.

Lavender, no, no opening up here--wouldn't help and I wouldn't like it. We have more unplanned big projects to tackle before the kitchen, unfortunately, but I hope to start talking to an architect over the next few months, unless the economy tanks again!


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Marcolo- What if we did 1920s kitchens, while Palimpsest is gone? There are so many possiblities, it might be really fun! Maybe choose a style, show some pictures of the architecture and design elements that we're choosing...and then make the kitchen board. You've already named two styles and I can think of another one. What do you think?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Well if we are making pitches for the next topic, the material I had in mind to design around was Marmoleum Asian Tiger.

My impression is that a lot of people like it, but they don't know how to use it.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Marcolo: The fabric I have is more Asian. The hot house has a similar color value. I was too lazy to actually photograph what I have. I do love that fabric. Still can't decide if that is what I want. Love both colorways.

Lass: Thank you. I was thinking of the brass originally. I think it would pull out the orange nicely. And, it would warm up the gray. I do think that would be more appropriate for a colonial. Thanks for the suggestion!

Here is a link that might be useful: oxide


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Kimiko- I really like antique brass with silver...and somtimes a little copper. It's such a pretty combination...and I think silver is much warmer than the nickel and chrome. It seems to have more of a glow to it, but maybe that's all the polishing :)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Does anyone else want to weigh in on '20s kitchens vs. the Asian Tiger vs. something else?

I have a couple of concerns. I really want these to be applicable to real projects someone might do. Do we really think the Asian Tiger is a potentially popular product?

Second--My worry is that for '20s kitchens we'll just get people posting the typical vintage white kitchen look. Some have already done that, and we don't want people to just link to their finished kitchens! We could try to emphasize the post-sanitary (white cabs, white subway) look that started to become popular in the mid-20s. See below for what I mean.

We should also urge people to update the look somehow.

Thoughts?

Here is a link that might be useful: Be sure to check Gallery 1 AND Gallery 2


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I doubt the Asian Tiger will become a main stream popular product, but I'd enjoy seeing how people might make it work in a kitchen.

I'd still vote for the updated '20s kitchen though. I'm thoroughly enjoying these threads, but not brave enough to pull something together yet.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

This is my busiest season so I'm very late to this party, but I did want to contribute. My pretend 1950's Colonial Revival is a young couple's first home, and they've broken the bank getting into this house so their budget is small. It has a typical galley kitchen with an eat in area at one end, and was updated some time in the 80's with oak cabinets and white appliances.

Photobucket

Their design inspiration is an old sampler that was handed down from the wife's great-great-great-grandmother.
Photobucket

So they rip up the vinyl and paint their subfloor in a vibrant mustard yellow sampler pattern

They paint the cabinetry that bluey green and use a couple of punched tin pieces in place of some of the panels & put plain brass knobs and pulls on it.

Buy a plain Formica Travertine laminate counter from Lowes and put a white cast iron vintage sink from the architectural salvage store on top and pick up a plain chrome Moen faucet while they are at the box store.

Their splurges are buying two new punched tin light fixtures to replace the central fluorescent and the bird and vine wallpaper for the small amount of wall in the breakfast area and above the backsplash of the laminate counter. They find a vintage clear glass and harvest gold pendant for over the sink and a vintage brass chandelier on craigslist for over their vintage brass "pineapple" table that they already own. They build a small painted teal banquette into the corner and use the various fabrics on the bottom for pillows along with two ladder back chairs that they paint teal and cover with the yellow gingham. Of course when they are antiquing, they pick up those canisters and the phone and a few other 70's accessories in that harvest gold.

Of course, they keep the white appliances for now, but this will be their "facelift" for the moment until they can afford a more thorough remodel.

Photobucket

I just wanted o show that you don't have to spend a lot of money to achieve a cohesive design. Nor do you have to rip out and replace everything that currently exists. Paint is cheap, and cabinets do not always need to be painted white to "update" a kitchen.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Marcolo- Thanks for the link! It will be so much fun to look through these, this afternoon :)

Maybe we could state...there will be no 'one true kitchen' examples (LOL) but something that would be functional for today, but work with the style of a home, built in the 1920s? The romantic revival styles, the early art deco, isn't prairie style part of that too?

I think with romatic revival, you would have Colonial, English/Tudor, Storybook, French/Norman, Spanish, Egyptian, etc. to choose from. The white kitchens and marble are more Edwardian, aren't they? I'm no expert, but they don't seem to be 1920's kitchens. The exposure to Europe, after WWI, the new technologies, the reaction to Victorian architecture...there were so many influences...and the fact that a very large number of homes were built in the 1920s!


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Nice

LWO- That's the kind of kitchen project I wish we saw more of on the forum and on TV! What a great way to work with what you have and still update a kitchen for your family. I love that the sampler is the inspiration for the kitchen. I also really like the colors and fabrics you've chosen, and the no fuss finishes...along with the fun flea market finds. Great kitchen :)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Could we do an updated 1920's kitchen with the constraint that the new cook wants to avoid white cabinets? (That's me, for example, but I promise not to post any ego shots of my OKM.)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I am game for a post-hygeinic 20s kitchen with a twist. Should we have a deadline? 3 days?

Also, I think we need to have a rule. I think, if I scroll back, some people have posted a mood board and not gotten a comment. I think anyone who goes to the trouble of posting one deserves at least one comment. Maybe in the format Marcolo suggested and I used, or some other. Also, unlike a FK post, i think its fine to be critical.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Sounds fun, but I feel like I've been given a homework assignment and I haven't paid enough attention to the prof this semester. Three days is plenty of time to cram though - perhaps too much?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Wow, LWO!! That is fantastic. You've given a lot for us to talk about. I was staring at samplers this week trying to figure out how to work them in--your idea is pure genius. Someone who updated a kitchen that way might never get around to a full renovation.

Lavender, every word is spot on. The One True Kitchen is very specifically Edwardian in inspiration, sometimes veering into a bit of Victorian butler pantry. In the '20s, color and prettiness came in, and there was a lot of interest in European design brought home to the farm by doughboys who had seen Paree.

Circus, I agree on the no white kitchens. What about no subways? We probably should also exclude straight-out craftsman, too. Those are very easy to just cut and paste, because there are so many gorgeous examples on the Web.

Mtnrededux, yes, we should write the rules to say, everybody deserves a comment, and nobody should feel slighted by criticism, right up front.

Don't know about the deadline, though. People may have busy schedules.

Who wants to write up the post? I don't mind doing it again if people can wait for the weekend, but at the same time I have no desire to take over like Reese Witherspoon in Election. We do have to specify the Rules and point to that website as homework.


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White cabinetry

I don't know if we should exclude white cabinetry, since there are some pretty examples, in the 1920's kitchen link. Maybe challenge people that if they use white cabinetry...they better bring in color with their floors, appliances, tiles, trim, etc.?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

White cabs are certainly 100% authentic to the '20s. But I guarantee if we allow them, we'll get bunch of standard white kitchens with a "pop" of color.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I don't think you can outright ban subways. My understanding of tile history is that the reason subway tile and 4x4 tile dominated wall applications in the early part of the century was because they didn't have adhesives adequate for larger tile. If you take out subways, you are really limiting people's choices with regard to period-appropriate tile.

I'm all for excluding white cabinetry, though.

I may put Asian Tiger in my 20's kitchen, if you think it is too far out for its own thread. If we ever decide to do one around it, I'd be ready.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Isn't that where the 'critique my kitchen' comes into play? I mean, if someone does that...I don't think they shouldn't expect many kind comments about their choices.

Also, should we pick an exterior shot of our 1920's style home and maybe a quick explanation of the space? I really like the way LWO did the post, above. There was a 'family story' to go with the story board :)


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I wouldn't ban anything. Just make it clear what we are looking for.

I put three days because I wanted to give people MORE time. It felt like there was a race to answer. But I guess now that I look at it, this has been up 4 days already.


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I suppose I can simply express a very dim view of white. Perhaps ban a scheme that's completely white--a white hutch, or white doors with a stencil pattern might be OK.

Subways, I'm not sure about. They stopped being used much past the mid-20s and did not reappear in any significant way until this century. People really need to wake up from this delusion that subways have always been timeless and classic and used in kitchens every year from 1900 til today. And frankly, whether they've been used or not, who needs an exercise like this to see more of them?


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

I am very late to this party, work sure does get in the way of fun, real and virtual. Anyway, take this as carte blanche to critique anything I post, ever, on any topic, the only way we learn is to have different points of view heard.

And I have to confess that, as usual, I didn't read the directions well, I didn't keep budget in mind and I didn't do a real colonial revival, oops. Selfishly, I used elements that I would have used in my own kitchen had I the funds; Crown Point cabs, lavastone counters, over the top lighting and fabrics that I'm sure are in or close to 3 digits a square yard. I also used things that I thought were a contemporary take on colonial revival, albeit without really researching CR at all, I guess that would have been too much like work.

Love the Asian Tiger marmo, great colors and feel.

sandyponder


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RE: Design Around This #2: Colonial Revived

Before this thread ends, I just want to thank the contestants. Especially Marcolo, who inspired me with the Corian Thyme. I loved how the counters looked with that window view enough to want to try to create a color board using it for my eventual kitchen. Maybe even with the grays.

I also want to thank Marcolo for the articulation about people here who are "clawing for help in design direction--and all they're actually thinking of doing is in infinitesimally small variation on the One True Kitchen. Which is probably going into a '70s raised ranch". In my case, it's not a raised ranch. It's just a regular old tiny ranch. And I appreciate all the help I can get.


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