Return to the Kitchens Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Posted by palimpsest (My Page) on
Sat, Nov 5, 11 at 20:03

Here is an element to design around. Let's come up with some SCHEMES first, not just additional single elements.

Apple Jasper
Photobucket


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

The first color I think of when I see this is maroonish plum. And a lot of clear glass. and leather, wrought iron, stone to compliment the rocky feel of the, what is that anyway?


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

It makes me think "Bali"

Here is a link that might be useful: nice spot


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Just for cab color. Not quite what I'm picturing but sort of:

Farrow & Ball "String"

I'm rushing. I have no idea why I feel like I'm in a race!


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

:) Take your time :)


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Can I mix it with this stuff?


 o
asdf

Fascinated by the plum idea! I'm wondering if this could also work in a (shudder) "old world" scheme?


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I have some ideas:
Sink: a carved block of this stone. Also, a vent hood, glass type, except the glass is a slab of the same stone. Cabinets, quartersawn ash slab, amber stain, matte varnish. Backsplash, venetian glass mirrors. Flooring, tile linen finish 18"x12" semi-glossy, with black onyx border 6" at cabinets/edges. Countertops, warm botticino marble 2.5" thick, polished top, rock-faced edges.
Range, a smaller AGA with a tobacco sunburst finish (like a vintage guitar) dark bronze hardware all around, with worn (lighter) highlights and 25% verdigris patina.
I see a art deco with the sharply-defined edges removed.
Why didn't you pick malachite?
Casey


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I'm not sophisticated enough to do what you all are doing so I'll just say - MCM set in the edge of a forest/urban area with a hint of the sky showing, with the main living area facing east and the kitchen facing south.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Inspired by mntnrdx's Bali comment.

Floor:

Yes, these are tiles.

A faucet like this--can't find the kitchen version right now. Although you could almost set it right into the counter like a little apron-front prep sink.

Pendant:

Hey, step it up, people. Pictures required!


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I see something very femme and '30's, not a darker plum but a softer, grayer orchid. Would the cabinetry be black?


 o
asdf

Sorry, screwed up the tile picture.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Hold yer horses, marcolo, some of us got slow typin' fingers at the moment (sliced open a knuckle while creating huge cutout eyeballs for my upstairs windows last Monday) --

But now that I see your pictures, we MUST have your pendants.

I'm feeling jaded glam, that green jasper in my mind's eye with smoked black martini glasses strewn on it. All empty, and some tipped over.


 o
sorry

No tile joy yet, my friend. Isn't that the lady with the cat's pawprint tiles?


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

It reminds me of a stone patio


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I think the URL doesn't play well with the forum's 1995 software. It's the second one down.
Not sure how you'd actually apply it. But in general I see a leaf pattern that is somehow striking and unique.

Hey! I took touch-typing in HS baby!

BTW pal can we get a linkable pic of that stone? As the thread grows it's hard to see all the elements in context unless you want to be supernerdy like circus. ;-p

Speaking of whom, it's interesting you went with a mauve. I was picturing a deep, deep plum.


 o
asdf

Yowza! OMG jterrilin, those pendants with those cabinets over that stone!


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Here's a version of mine;

In order: Walls/Uppers; Backsplash; Counters/hardware; Base cabinets; Floor; Fabrics and fixture.
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucket
Photobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Pal, is that a sort of a 70's eighties mix? It's hard for me to think in greens. I hope you do more of these little creative tests. We are going to down size in a year and I want to practice for my little 60's Florida house with a tiny yard. I want to do something completly different to what I have had to mix and go with in the house I have now.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I was just pulling from the Concetto, with no particular period reference in mind. The paint is Farrow and Ball Setting Plaster, the Silestone is Gedatsu, the cabinet is Walnut, the flooring is Ann Sacks Hacienda Concrete tile in Ocean Green, and the fabrics are from Donghia. The green fabric is actually made from shed Peacock Feathers, woven only by two families in India, $$$$ I am assuming. The knob is current, from P E Guerin, and the pendant is from 2011 also.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

This is fun to watch and see it evolve!


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Love it! Maybe this over the dining table.


 o
RE: chandelier

Is that Dale Chihuly?


 o
asdf

Yes. Ever see a whole exhibit? It's enough to make you forgive his assembly-line fabrication methods.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

or in this finish (floor)behind the aubergine La Cornue with the brushed brass accentsCan't find cabinet finish I'm seeking, slightly grayer than this, similar design, ignore red part


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Blarghhh. These images didn't spread out like this when first previewed! Sconces came from 1st Dibs searches for "Murano glass sconces," after "moonstone" and "pearl" failed. Sink and faucets from Rocky Mountain Hardware solid bronze series in light patina. Paint samples all from Farrow and Ball: Radicchio, Stony Ground, Brinjal. Aubergine La Cornue stove with burnished brass accents refused to copy. Cabinets from Smallbone. Found the style I wanted, but I wanted a much toned down, somewhat grayed finish. Floor some sort of black Belgian stone. Backsplash (possibly) a Michael Smith bronze. Was posting while others were--also looked for Murano and Chihuly chandeliers and purple contemporary cased crystal old fashioned glasses. Nothing quite shaped like I wanted. Interesting that everyone seemed to think the Concetto suggested bronzey finishes.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Since Dale Chihuly only has one eye, other people have to do the work since you need good depth perception to blow glass.
But to me it starts to beg the question whether its really his "work." Plenty of people have artistic visions that they don't or can't execute...he is surrounded by people who can make it happen. If I have an idea, but someone else makes it, whose work is it? Isn't it at least collaborative?


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Does it really matter how Dale Chihuly's work gets accomplished? It's his vision and none of it would have happened without him. Perhaps because of him there are many more glass artists that were inspired and taught by him. We saw the exhibition in Boston and it was breath taking.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Yes, it was breathtaking, and yes, it matters very much how his work gets accomplished. His studio is not made up of monkeys but artists in their own right, and without their handiwork his objects would be nothing.

I've been looking for a sort of abstract banana leaf tile that I've seen, but can't find it. Grr!


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Perhaps you could have an artist fabricate it for you? Hugs.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Questions:
1) Where do you guys get all of these images?
2) How do you archive them?
3) Then, do you photoshop these elements into an image to post?
4) Is Photoshop how you get things to over lay, like Circuspeanut's post near the beginning?

I might want to play this game but I need more technical help. I know how to use photoshop but unfortunately on my current computer I can't load my ancient edition.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I save them in Photobucket and resize them. I don't photoshop. I do Google searches but I also have a mental Rolodex when it comes to this stuff and I can find it.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Aha! You don't have to execute it, it can be "conceptual art".
Just saw a Sol Lewitt show at the Mass MOCA and he is the "architect" of this art movement.

Since I have zero skills with my hands, I love the idea that an artist can be the idea generator with no execution ... .how cushy!

Here is a link that might be useful: is it art?


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I don't even bother w Photobucket for photos that are already on the Web. Just link them from their original site, per the instructions in the "Read me" posts.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Here is my INORGANIC version. To some this may be a cop out but the execution of fully correlated neutrals or whites is actually rather difficult.

Again as the backsplash, because I think it deserves vertical exposure:
Photobucket
SUPERWHITE WALLS:
Photobucket
WHITE LACQUER CABINETS WITH WHITE ZEUS EXTREME SILESTONE:
Photobucket
WHITE KERLITE FLOORS:
Photobucket

RICHARD SHULTZ PETAL TABLE, with WHITE LEATHER CHAIRS
PhotobucketPhotobucket

And just to refer back, a MALACHITE WOOL RUG by TONY DUQUETTE, and a GREEN REGENCY-PERIOD FIXTURE
PhotobucketPhotobucket


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Love the plum and Asian inspired looks posted, but for something completely different, I went all colonial, or, perhaps "fauxlonial", cuz it's hard to have authenticity 250 or so years later.

I'm not a fan of colonial per se, I grew up in NNE in the 60's and 70's, and a lot of the decorating was heavy duty colonial. The apple jasper that palimpsest posted vaguely resembles a cocktail table top that one of our neighbors had (same chunky look, but in beige IIRC) and they had a colonial LR, so I thought, WHT, let's see what happens.

Original stone, used for counters in our fauxlonial kitchen:

Photobucket

Wood-Mode Hancock raised panel cabs, in as Early American finish as I could find:

Photobucket

Cab knobs:

Photobucket

Window treatment fabric:

Photobucket

Backsplash, Vermont/NY unfading green slate:

Photobucket

Flooring, antique brick:

Photobucket

Hubbardton Forge Chandelier in wrought iron:

Photobucket

Range Hood (which may not really blend, but I like it a lot):

Photobucket

Brass Faucet:

Photobucket

Apron sink in biscuit:

Photobucket

Flame stitch fabric for upholstered, high backed, dining table "sofas" (sorry, I don't know what to call them):

Photobucket

Fireplace the dining table is in front of:

Photobucket

sandyponder


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I used Photoshop and just dumped images onto a transparent background. I use it a lot in other contexts, but it's not hard to get the basics down quickly.
You can download a trial version of the latest Photoshop here. It's kind of a memory hog, though, so if your computer is limited you could try Photoshop Elements instead.

Also, it's pretty easy to make a page with pictures in any word processing program you're comfortable with, like Microsoft Word. Save it as a jpg file and upload it to a free image host, like imgur.com or tinypic.com. Then link it on your post here.



If an image is too huge after you preview it here, a common problem, you don't have to fiddle with the image at all! You can modify how it displays straight from your forum post by changing the code thusly:

If the code you've pasted is:

<img src="http://blahblah.com/greatimage.jpg" />
add this:
<img width="400px" src="http://blahblah.com/greatimage.jpg" />
I've used "400px" as an example; it could be up to about 1000px and still be OK for the forum; anything wider than that will stretch the page unpleasantly for some readers with smaller screens (plus take up lots of loading time).
You don't have to specify a height - it will scale proportionately, automagically!


Images found on the internet are generally copyrighted; I take some liberties when copying them for display here, since this is not a commercial venue.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Thanks very much for the information on technical aspects of posting. I used to be a photoshop pro but its been years. I will give it another go once I get another computer. this computer im on wont even let me download a trial version of PS. Oh well DH says he's going to get me a laptop so I say YES make it a MAC ;) probably a pc though, due to cost.

Palimpsest I think the vertical version of the stone is perfect. It looks like a colored version of Chinese hill paintings. I understand that those VERY vertical hills that are in China are composed of Loess. Loess is a wind formation of very fine soil. Loess has a few very interesting properties. I understand the only other place on the planet that loess is formed into these large hills is in western Iowa, the Loess Hills. Though I suppose not as tall. The Loess Hills in Iowa are charming but not dramatic.

But I digress. I love the vertical format.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

NO FAIR!!!! I say it's spinich, and I say the hell with it.

When I sought the Apple Jasper on the Concetto site, I found not only the image palimsest posted but also what purports to be the stone installed, albeit as a floor. In the latter scale, it looks muddier, busier, and less subtle than the lovely paisleyish teals to nile green to greenish greige in the original photo.

To me, it really makes a difference, and I wonder if anyone knows of another photo of it actually installed.

Given the original challenge, I would go with slightly greenish pale gray cabinets, gunmetal appliances, dark wood floors, some kind of muted off-white matte glass backsplash, and the coppery accents marcolo posted. The other, minus the apparent luminosity of the close-up, is so busy as to be sick-making, and I would paint it black.

Here is a link that might be useful: Product installed


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Can one of you kindly define "scheme" vs "single design element" and what that means to your design process?
I'm fascinated!


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

OK, using pal's idea of the granite as a backsplash.

Countertop: Resined or waxed brass.


Cabinets: Bamboo.

"Wallpaper"--This guy does huge nature murals. I think Candace Olsen used him, and I'm picturing this used the way she did--covering invisible pantry doors along one wall, maybe.

Kitchen table (this also comes in a more Saarinen shape but couldn't find it with a brass base).

There are several pendants that could work.


This is actually woven brass wire.

Integral sink with something like this in ORB:

Yes, we could be into Disney territory with the mural and the bamboo wood. Could depend on the space.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I saw that too, it looks bad in that picture.

But I never had to say it was something that was easy :) All of the Concetto offerings--except the white and pink quartzes perhaps--walk a tightrope I think--in the wrong hands they could be really lethal.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Cripes, let's try that countertop again.


 o
qwrge

UGHH. Why does it display perfectly in preview and not at all in a post?

Look at it here,

I had never heard of brass countertops til this very day.


 o
RE: Concetto

I meant the Concetto looked bad in one picture on the site.

BalTra, I meant for people to conceptualize a good part of the room, meaning finishes for floors, cabinets, etc., rather than finding something like an individual cabinet knob that would look cool with the Jasper.

First as a part of the game to get the ball rolling, because individual pieces or elements can always be changed and added but second, I think the CONCEPT is the important part of the process --finding elements to fit the IDEA is a more cohesive way to design.

I think a lot of people design by the seat of the pants method..."hey I like this!" hey, I like that!" Hey, and this!" ...."Hmm, now to make it all work together".


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Wow, I kind of completely overlooked the most traditional way to use a high-impact stone.

First, open this in a new window to set the mood.

We'll use this as a, um, backsplash again, but set in an inlay sort of like this:

But of course not those colors. Here's the mix:



with line trim of this, perhaps.

Cabinets are white but sort of in this style (but more baroque rather than neoclassical, I think):

with this kind of, um, "glazing" lol:

Perhaps for the prep sink, if unavailable as kitchen faucets.

Counters would be in the calacatta, perhaps contrasted with the emparador on different runs.

Instead of pendants, a pair of these would be permanently anchored to the island:

Breakfast setee (would need to be gilded of course).

A traditional baroque chandelier would be perfect, of course, but we could shake it up with this modern thing over the setee (finish gilded again):

These could also be charming if playful choices for a separate breakfast nook.

The range of course:

Perhaps the hood should be a nice baldequin, topped like this:

Or, if it's a flat-topped mantel style, we could find something like this to perch up top.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I think this would serve as a potfiller:

Photobucket

In all seriousness, I think for the next round we should design around something that is simple, sturdy but still interesting, we can alternate between that and the baroque, but no-holds-barred actually gets easier at some point because there are no limitations. I think it will keep us on our toes to alternate.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Marcolo, you keep linking images that have no image file on them. (Ditto the pages you're linking - you're cutting something off in the code you're pasting. If the file has blank spots in its name, fill them with " " or this old forum software won't be able to store them properly; your browser can read them just fine, but they'll get garbled once they're saved into the GW database and regurgitated.)

Here's the waxed brass countertop; I looked into this but brass is very pricey and not DIY-able without welding tools.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I think variety is good. And my last "mood board" was in fun, but really, most of the designs posted here are eminently do-able. They definitely show how many directions are possible starting with just a single piece--other than bland, boring and discordant, with a "pop."

Ironically, or perhaps tragically, there are several threads in the top few pages right now that feature:

1. Finished kitchens cobbled together by pointing and saying, "I want that!" no matter how badly it all works together

2. Kitchen projects in process that are proceeding in the exact same way

3. Other projects where the OP says, "I want neutral, I'll wait to pick out everything later."

You have your work cut out for you.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Interesting pedagogical strategy, palimpsest. The only problem is that it is driving us all deeper into our fantasy (or nightmare) lives, and giving us precious little in terms of skills for real world problem solving. (Actually, we are also learning to put together ostensibly compatible collections of surfaces, but that's less fun than the nightmare extravaganzas.)

If you dare, why not give us the challenge of a real space -- not a forum member's before kitchen space or anything in which any of us would be emotionally invested. Just a challenging space for approaches as to how it might be made better by planning and design and working with the "givens," rather than tchotchkes.

Posted today is a great example of inspired reworking of an unpromising space. I am awed. But for your purposes, palimpsest, I think you could give us a photo from an unidentified real estate listing and say "Design Around This." Then we might learn something we can run with.

Here is a link that might be useful: SusieQusie's before and after


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Did you ever see this kitchen in House Beautiful? There's a reclaimed brass--or was it bronze--counter top on the bar. The homeowners say it's impractical, but I sure do like it. (I also like the tiles, but they're discontinued.)


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Circus, thanks, that must be the issue--the blank spaces.

How much are those brass countertops? I can find FAQs and pros/cons for lots of other materials, but not for brass.

For the purpose of this exercise, I'm not sure whether the practicality of one single element really matters. The issue is that people are renovating kitchens with no central idea to guide them. You did have one--vintage. Plus colors that came from your old stove and such. But most people seem to proceeding through their project by making random moves at each decision point.

And if they ever choose a single element that does have strong visual impact, now the GW conventional wisdom is that everything else in the room has to be less interesting than a dial tone. Not true.

For all the garbage shows on HGTV (which I just finished trashing in another thread), there was one tip I thought useful--name your concept. "Midcentury tropical." "Baroque fantasy." Or whatever. Sometimes that helps people stay focused.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Starting with the Apple Jasper...

From Kitchen plans

This Aga...

From Kitchen plans

The cabinets on the upper picture...with the copper sink and cool accent around the pass through.

From Kitchen plans

And this accent tile...which I really like :)

From Kitchen plans


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I am not 100% sure what you are asking for, but I think for the most part the space planning aspects of the kitchen are well-covered.

In a stylistic sense in terms of concept development, sure, I think that could be a discussion. I think there is a discussion that could take place in more depth about neutrals and undertones, and color fatigue vs. visual fatigue.

There could also be a discussion of working with a particular existing element --or a more "available" element.
Like an oak door...

The only issue I see is that it could be a certain amount of preaching to the choir, because I am not sure the people who don't get it delve into these discussions, and maybe they don't want to get it either. Sometimes I think granite vs.___and stainless vs.___ conversations could go the way of conversations of politics and religion, something one just doesn't discuss.


 o
asdf

If you're going to make us design around an orange '80s cathedral arch door we better all start drinking now.


 o
Other kitchen options

Palimpsest- I'd like to see examples of kitchens that are unique and unusual. Still well designed and fuctional, but with features you don't see in the majority of the kitchen magazines. I'm so tired of seeing white kitchens, with marble and wood countertops...or soapstone...or green cabinets with granite...and the occasional wood kitchen with marble or granite.

This doesn't mean I don't think they're pretty, because I like white cabinets and want to use some wood and marble on my island countertop...I'd just like to see something different! There must be some other, more colorful choices...that are still beautiful and stylish, without going overboard.

Did anyone see BalTra's inspiration kitchen? I like the turquoise and orange with the wood! Here's a link :)

Here is a link that might be useful: Link to Houzz kitchen


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I like it, Lavender!

"If you're going to make us design around an orange '80s cathedral arch door we better all start drinking now."

But marcolo, that's the real challenge, no? Yes, I had a solid scheme in my head, and I'm one of those irritating people who don't ask for design advice, but have I ever shown you a 'before' of my kitchen as it was when I purchased the house?

And that doesn't include the scary stove wall. Hey! We could use my "before" kitchen, if you'd like, to be sure not to offend anyone. I know what I did with it, but it would be interesting to see what others would do with it.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I don't see the value in that. People don't really "design around" '80s oak doors very often. They paint them, stain them, or demo them. If they leave them alone, they are only looking for a few niceties from Target to tart them up.

In terms of starting with a building, rather than an object or a finish, the only value I see is starting with a house rather than a kitchen--to illustrate different directions people can go in yet still maintain some sense of context. And I don't mean picking a particularly ugly house on purpose, just a regular house. However, I think that is somewhat dangerous territory due to the solipsism epidemic, which leads people to force their way to the spotlight howling with faux outrage because someone doesn't like a house that's sorta, kinda like theirs, except ten states away and twenty years newer, but still. I think it's safer to start with a piece of tile, or a sink.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

For organization, how about voting after discussion on basic elements and building a design that way?

I see that luscious stone bringing a similar green outdoors into a modern kitchen with plain slab dark wood cabinets. Simple, rather masculine, modern Craftsman with strong wood beams above, plain surfaces and sheets of glass elsewhere. Fine wood, low gloss, little grain pattern. Flooring continues outside.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Circuspeanut- Thanks! I love that Aga :)

Your before kitchen has some beautiful elements! The trim around the windows and doorway is what I want in my farmhouse kitchen. There are a few older windows, with that trim, but most of it was 'updated' in the 1950's...with that skinny trim :(

I like the idea of the open shelves and the paneling/beadboard backsplash, too. Of course, that may completely be the wrong style for what you envision in your 'after' kitchen, but I'm saving this photo, to show my GC...not only for the trim, but the windows, too!

Marcolo- Maybe the orange 80s cathedral arch could work with BalTra's inspiration kitchen? It's probably the wrong style, but the orange would work! I think a 'beverage of choice' would make these posts even more fun! :)


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Lavender, here's what that same view looks like now, more or less. The window trim is nice, and about all that I wanted to keep:


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

All cathedral arches, and all oak, are not the same:-)
Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

I agree, though, starting with a before that even vaguely resembles something that someone might have, critiquing it and changing it is just bound to bring out: people thinking is is about their kitchen, people criticizing us of elitism, and at least one person who thinks they know someone who defaulted on a house like that & who is now homeless and would love to have it back. I am not up for that right now.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

What do you suggest we do next?

Although first, maybe a wrap-up is in order (not to cut off anyone else who still has ideas to show). I was going to make a couple of comments about the vignettes, but really, it all boils down to a simple question: This isn't that hard to do. Why don't people do it?


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

It IS hard to do for a lot of people. I had someone pick a cabinet because she liked the NAME of the finish. Didn't like the doorstyles or the color of the finish all that much, it turned out, but that took some digging.

Feel free to wrap up and then at this point I would say pick another starting element, but maybe this time it should be something more downmarket than $$$ a square foot. Or, pick a CONCEPT a la HGTV like you were saying and see how it plays out. We could try it at different price points or something.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Circuspeanut- Your 'after' kitchen is so pretty! The tile is amazing...you should post more pics :)

Palimpsest and Marcolo- I think it is difficult for some people, either because they're not comfortable with color or they're just afraid of making the wrong choice. It seems pretty easy to me...stick with pastels, jewel tones, grayed tones or clear neutrals. I think the 'muddy neutrals' are when people can get into the most trouble, because of the different undertones of gray, yellow, pink, etc.

As for naming your concept, I think that's a great idea! I do that all the time and it does help me stay focused. In fact, I do that with my gardens, too :)


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

A thought for a "concept," feel free to disregard :) How about "Tuscan" or "French" or "French baroque" or "old world" or something that everyone picks on all the time. I'd like to see how the GW design masters would do a non-Disney/non-olive garden version of a very distinct and "overdone" kitchen style.

I find this thread fascinating, and I find it interesting to think about why people don't do things more like this. For one thing, I think it's very hard to push yourself to do something without any kind of guidance or "inspiration pics" to guide you. I didn't contribute here because I really had no idea where to even start looking with this one or to conceptualize because it is outside of my comfort zone as far as design.

I think anything that steps too far outside of the mainstream is going to be risky and people are going to be reluctant to make a big investment in it, especially when it's likely to draw criticism from other people when it doesn't look like the kitchen design magazine or house beautiful or HGTV tells it to. Even if you love what you are doing, it is hard not to second guess when a lot of people tell you it's wrong or tacky or whatever.

Also, I would like to speak up in defense of cathedral arch doors. Thank you :)


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

OK. Let's pick a concept. I'd like it to be applicable to a reasonable number of people. But I am in 100% agreement with lavender that it's only interesting doing something unique.

What about "Uptown Phony Colonie?" A lot of people live in pseudo-colonial houses in suburbia. I'd like to see something other than completely unrelated RH or PB phony rusticism. Something more elegant, more hip, more unusual, more modern--yet still in some way relating to colonial revival architecture even in its tract home variety.


 o
asdf

Beagles, we cross-posted.

First, it is hilarious to me to hear you say this is "outside your comfort zone." Hon, blue and yellow rococo molding?? You're braver than you let on!

Second, I think both of those ideas are excellent. They represent the other directions that people go in, sometimes affected by their house style (picture FL or CA tile roofed houses with Tuscan kitchens) and sometimes in sheer blind obliviousness to it. I actually thought colonial and old world, of some sort, ought to be the top two on our list.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

And how about if we have a day or so to rest and ponder.

I did Apple Jasper on crack kitchen design this weekend.


 o
design...

LOL Marcolo, I can be brave. I just don't know where to start unless I have something I can take a derivative approach to. Like starting w/ a rococco baroque and trying to do a different twist. I've just never started with a material and gone with it without first deciding on a "theme" in my head. (Although no one would probably guess just by looking, I did this even in the bathrooms at my house, with each one inspired by the elements of earth, wind, water and fire).

I think old world, colonial, any of those styles would all be especially interesting because they have been "done" so much and become so clearly defined. It makes it both easier and harder to do a derivative version that is recognized as in the style of, but that isn't just another cliche.


 o
RE: Design #2

Would you like to set some parameters, or not?


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

If we're doing a french style, we could start w/ this hood as our element maybe:

Or "old world"


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

" I think it is difficult for some people, either because they're not comfortable with color or they're just afraid of making the wrong choice. "

I think this sums up a lot of the ho-hum "neutral" kitchens that get made. (NOTE: I'm talking about the ho-hum ones, not the well done neutral GW kitchens). There is a prevalent misconception that neutrals are safe (not to mention classic and timeless), if you can't identify a real coordinating colour. Those incapable of identifying the undertones present really really ought to consult a local professional, not a bunch of well meaning strangers with variable computer hardware.

So, I have a problem in practical terms, with finding fabulous elements on the internet. Actually, two problems. First, can you ever find the same item (tile, granite, flooring, whatever) to buy at a price that fits your budget? And second, if you can find it, is it the same colour in real life as you thought it looked like on your monitor? I'm always blown away that folks ask for paint colour advice here on the forum, when no one can actually get an accurate view of the coordinating features already present in their kitchens. I've tried a few times to give advice for choosing colour, but folks want a COLOUR (also a brand and name/#), not a strategy for decision making.

I'm a quilter, and work in a quilt shop. I have no trouble putting colours, patterns and textures together, and although my husband initially went apoplectic when I suggested that designing a kitchen was just like making a quilt, he quickly backed off and let me get on with our kitchen - he likes what we ended up with.

I guess where I'm going with all this is, I can't play along with these admittedly fascinating theoretical games, because I just can't "shop" for anything of colour on the internet.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Cooksnews- I know exactly what you mean. When I scan a picture, my monitor is not even close. The greens and blues seem to change, once they've been scanned...especially from magazine photos.

My grandmother was an excellent seamstress and could design clothes, too. I learned a lot helping her and seeing how colors work, together.

I think the prettiest rooms are a mixture of one or two neutrals (maybe creamy white cabinets and wood floors) mixed with a metal or two and some color! A little color can bring a lot of personality to what would other wise be a bland, neutral space.

Beagles- You are my go-to color person! I love all the blue in your home...and that you're not afraid to decorate with what you love! :)


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I am late to this party because I had software issues with making my mood board, so please indulge me belatedly.
I have to admit, I did go neutral on the bs, but I really did not want to compete with the star of the show.
Photobucket
Photobucket


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Beagles- I think old world would be a good topic. How about something that would actually work with this home, wisteria and all? :)

From Lavender Lass farmhouse pictures


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Dianolo, you're entitled to be late if you're going to bring that stuff with you! Where did you ever find cabinets like that?

cooksnews, your observations are spot on but I don't see how it's a problem for our exercise here. This is just a proof of concept. If it were a real kitchen, this is exactly what you'd do to start, but of course you'd bring home samples to look at and try out.

beagles, I think my issue with those hoods is they already assume and accept a certain definition of a concept. They equate French with Disney American French. That seems to skip ahead and remove the point of the exercise, too--it's all over but the roosters.

Yes, I think we should have parameters. First, I would prefer to pick an example of the kind of house people really live in, just to set context--I don't care what kind, just nothing too rare, like a Carpenter Gothic. It can be a modern development or one of the more everyday types of old houses, though probably nothing too distinctive: a really iconic craftsman house is going to give us a standard craftsman kitchen. Then pick a theme, element and name, and go from there. It should be a 99% kitchen, not a 1% kitchen, as well. That obviously still includes a range of budgets.

So we could pick a generic modern colonial; a pseudo Spanishy house, like current CA or FL or AZ tract home; or one of those sorta craftsman but really just generic 1910-1930 ish homes; or a generic ranch.

And then we could do one of these (these are just to spark ideas):

- Uptown Phonie Colonie
- Tuscan Redux
- Louis MMXV (that's 2015, clever, huh?)

We might also need to mandate one particular material or object.

pal?


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Those cabinets are made with reclaimed wood. It is a lot easier to design with no budget in mind ;)
I was able to pull together a full kitchen concept with minimal searching. I guess if one has unlimited funds, you just pick what you want and say "I'll take it".
IRL - I agonized every every choice and can't begin to count how much time I spent on each element. Some looks are also easier to pull off than others. Materials are mostly made in the earthy colors these days and while none of the ones I picked for this exercise were too mainstream, I still had plenty to choose from to complete my picks. It is a lot harder to find the right shade/size/shape of lavender tile than something more neutral at an affordable price.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Here is what I suggest, but I think Marcolo should pick the final project:

A "typical" house, yes. And the kitchen design should feel appropriate to the house, so...

The "colonial" or "old world" etc., should be revival or redux, since doing something too purely authentic would not fit in most houses. No cracked beams and sagging ceilings.

I feel like doing either the colonial revival or the tuscan this time, because they were the first thrown out by people.

How about no central object or finish for this one?

So Marcolo, pick the type of house, general size etc., the style and any other general parameters. Next time someone else can choose, and we can pick a central material or mix it up a bit each round. (I think a good project would be a 'different neutrals and granite kitchen' or a 'one true kitchen version two', for example.

Shoot for something educational in the process. A "why" or "how" with your choices would be good too.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I'll work on the new "assignment" after work! I agree, no finish provided.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Oh darn...ok I'll still play with a regular house. I will give another try with going crazy in this post though because I decided I wanted a glassed over water floor in the inspiration kitchen. And although poplar wood is not real hardy for dings I love the wood with all it's color variants from green shades to dark eggplant mixed in. Sorry couldn't find hardware to go with the cabinets. I do love the lighting though.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Where on earth did you find those light fixtures? And I recognize that inset green and yellow panel from my own Googling, but I can't remember what it is!


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

You know, for that watery scheme, jterrilynn, how about the simplest of glass knobs?



 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I really like that lighting and whatever that gold/green is.

The "regular house" is next time :)


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

circuspeanut, that is sort of what I was looking for except I wanted something in a deep coral color set in brass or pewter. Its in my head but I coulnd't find it. I also could not find a natural stained example of poplar wood which shows its cool colors with some hints of green and dark. And, I wanted a faucet of something that looked like it was peeing when turned on, its in my head but I could not find that either. I need "people" lol.
Pal and Marco, the emerald and gold is wall paper.


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

(Lest you think I never work, I've been utterly bedridden by an extremely lethal cold/flu thing, so have plenty of time for random googling at the moment -- )


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

I'm late AND have nothing to offer, other than my thanks for this very entertaining and edifying thread, not to mention the promise of more to come.

I've been distracted by real life, so no time or brainpower to devote to this, but oh nice to pop in and read...

I agree with dianolo that it's fun and easy to design when the sky's the limit. And also when one doesn't have to worry about liking the end result in five or 10 years' time! Actually, I think an exercise like this for most people who are planning a new kitchen, *before* they start on the real kitchen, might be relaxing and liberating AND give them an idea of where they really might want to take their kitchen, before getting boxed in by neutrals and one-true-you-know-whats...

Thanks, all,

Becky


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Who knew green demolitions would have the kitchen for this?

http://www.greendemolitions.com/spazzigourmet.html

Here is a link that might be useful: kitchen


 o
RE: As suggested: Design Around This, #1

Are we still going to get feedback, from Marcolo and Palimpsest? Some of these groupings are really beautiful :)


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Kitchens Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here