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Caesarstone STAINING!!

Posted by jenos (My Page) on
Wed, Nov 5, 08 at 13:03

I have Caesarstone Baja in my kitchen and it is staining---odd, shadow-looking stains. I don't know what's causing these stains, but I keep fruit in the areas where the stains are located. Does anyone else have this problem?
Please help!
Thank you!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I'm bumping this up in case it got missed.

Have you tried moving the fruit to see if it happens again? What kind of fruit? The Baja doesn't come in a honed finish, so that is not to blame.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

Our silestone is 7 yrs old, and I have a couple spots like you describe. They are in areas that don't get much use, so I can't figure out what caused them. They aren't really very obvious --has to be just the right light, and you have to bend down to see them. So, actually, doesn't really bother me.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

My point completely! I hear so many people say: I want Caesar Stone because it doesn't stain like granite! LOL! Right! Research : best advise. A lady told me one day: "oh-you can put bleach on it: I like using bleach" get formica! Certified sales rep: you are able to call Caesar Stone yourself: said NO BLEACH.
Natural stone can stain. Period. My advise: keep Caesar Stone sealed and use "safe" cleaners only VOC compliant solvents for natural stone surfaces; cheaper than replacing stained surfaces. Fruit could stain Caesar Stone and granite as well. Call Caesar Stone customer service ask them.
Hope that helps....


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I checked their website and this is what it says:

Care & Maintenance
"Its hard, nonporous surface makes CaesarStone simple to clean. In most cases, soap and water or a mild detergent is all that is required to maintain its luster. If necessary, a non-abrasive cleanser such as Soft Scrub Liquid Gel with Bleach or Comet Soft Cleanser Cream With Bleach can be used along with a non-scratch or delicate scrub pad such as blue Scotch-Brite sponge."

"Are there any chemicals or cleaners to avoid using?
Avoid exposing CaesarStone to chemicals with high alkaline or PH level, such as oven grill cleaners, floor strippers, toilet bowl cleaners, oil soaps, tarnish removers, furniture cleaners and drain products."


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

OH MY GOSH!!! I'm so happy! I took soft scrub (the regular kind) with bleach and it removed ALL stains---even a water mark ring (not sure what it was, but that's what it looked like). Thank you for your help!

And, with all due respect, I chose Caesarstone not because it doesn't stain like granite, I chose it because it doesn't look like granite, I wanted a different look, cleaner and more uniform.

Thanks again!


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

OK so here's another thing: I have a sample of Espresso C-Stone and I tried cutting an apple on it and I have scratch marks from the cuts! I am "shocked" (as the commander was 'shocked' in Casablanca about gambling going on at Rick's Place) about the scratch marks. Actually, "disappointed" is a better word - I thought this stuff was supposed to be bullet-proof. Apparently, it is not.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I was told not to cut on my caesarstone and I know for a fact my installers scratched the edge of my island by not protecting it during delivery, they replaced the island because of that scratch. After 4 months of use, I only see 2 small scratches on the edge of my island, near the sink edge, no bigger than a quarter inch long piece of white thread. My caesarstone is ginger, a color similar to blue lagos, pretty even, only a few specks here and there.

I picked my caesarstone for it's shiny uniform look, it shows everything but cleans very easily.

I used to have eucalyptus granite and I cut on it all the time; but all the specks and spots would have hidden any marks. I also had nero impala granite, and it scratched near the sink, I could not figure out how it got there.

I'm glad your stains came out, I was going to recommend the creme cleanser, I haven't had to use it on mine yet.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I have caesarstone snow and it sure does stain. I can't put a cup of tea on it. If I leave a ring it leaves a brown shadowy mark. I have had ceasarstone rep out and they consider this acceptable. I don't. This is not stain resistant as advertised. They also advertise their cleanser as being able to remove tea and coffee. It does not. I am tearing my hear out. I should have got laminex. It is cheaper and cleans wonderfully.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

WOW. Wish I had read this earlier. Tonight is the first night we have used our new kitchen island (Ceasarstone "Pure White") and the first thing we noticed (about 5 minutes after uncorking a bottle of wine) is that the wine bottle and one glass both left a rim stain. We immediately wiped it. Stain still there. Sprayed on the cleanser left by the installer and it took the stain down to a faint shadow, but it's still there. Also the dirt left by the plumber and a scratch on the counter.....my designer recommended this product and color to me and she knows we USE our kitchen, have two teenagers who cook and that we entertain a lot. Feeling really bummed. I'm not too type A :) but this is gonna drive me to distraction. If you haven't bought this stuff yet, don't. I opted against granite because I wanted a more uniform look. I don't like the ceasarstone with the streaks and fake granite look. Should have stuck with granite.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

Any of the quartz countertop materials can be scratched. The problem is that approx. 30% of the material making up the surface is resin which is easily scratched. The quartz inclusions are very hard but they make up only a portion of the material.

quartz manufacturers like to advertise "90 some percent pure quartz" but they don't tell you the 90+% is based on WEIGHT, not volume. (last time I checked a bucket of rocks weighted considerably more than a bucket of glue)

quartz tops are still quite durable compared to all other countertop options except most "granites". A local stone supplier has a showroom sample with a piece of black quartz glued to a piece of black granite. Customers are encouraged to take a large knife and scratch the edge. After many passes with the knife the greater scratch resistance of the granite becomes obvious.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

One post, same day as joining, reviving a FIVE YEAR OLD thread, concluding "should've stuck with granite." All a coincidence, I'm sure.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

OK, it sounds suspicious, but what's the scoop? Does a light Cesarstone stain and scratch easily?


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I have Silestone Yukon Blanco, another very light quartz, and it did stain when I left a cardboard box of blackberries on it for several hours. There was a definite dark shadow where the blackberry juice had been. After reading the website, I rubbed a little softscrub on it, and the stain disappeared instantly. I've had the counters almost a year now, and haven't noticed any chips or scratches, and I don't baby them.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I think the bigger concern here is the apparently careless waste of wine that is happening in MLDean's household. That stuff is precious! Who is spilling it out of bottles and glasses?

In other words, I'm with Marcolo on this one.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

First MLDean said he/she liked the Caesarstone for the more uniform look, then said that he/she didn't like it for its "fake granite" look.

We have a light colored Caesarstone, and all of our wine, berry and tomato stains have scrubbed out very easily with dish soap. Even stains that have sat all night or longer, much less 5 minutes.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

There are a number of Caesarstone counters at our local Ikea and I did notice discoloration in a few of them. They couldn't possibly be related to staining since I am certain no one is drinking wine on the Ikea displays. I thought perhaps it was light-related but there is no sunlight even close. I just thought that the discoloration was odd.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I have had honed caeserstone champagne limestone color for five years. It is a fairly light beige color and I have it in my mud room, my kitchen and my guest bathroom countertop and my butler's pantry. Cooking is my most favorite thing in the whole world and I have two boys and a husband who are in my kitchen all the time doing things on my countertops. All of mine look practically brand-new, I have a couple of tiny chips on the edge of my kitchen counter around the sink and that is from banging it with it pots and pans. I have spilled red wine on it and had rings from wineglasses left on it overnight, I put a little soft scrub with bleach on the area let it sit a couple minutes scrub it a little tiny bit and it is completely gone. I would not hesitate to get it again in a heartbeat. We have done art projects with glue, we have gotten construction paper wet where the dye transfers and I have actually chopped directly on my countertop a big no-no, I know but it occasionally happens. Everything comes out completely with a little soft scrub with bleach.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I was bummed when several people in a row looked at my Silestone and declared that they couldn't tell it wasn't granite. I think they were trying to be nice, but I didn't want granite! So far it has happily survived red wine, raspberries and coffee as well as a whack that dented my favorite stock pot.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

@oldryder said "approx. 30% of the material making up the surface is resin"

That is a lie, and a lie that is easily disproved by using a magnifying glass to inspect the surface of the quartz.

The poster of that claim goes on to repeat an old myth about volume vs. weight that I debunked a long time ago (content copied here to save everyone time):

@HollySprings said "Quartz composite countertops are mostly resin, not mostly quartz."

I have seen this claim multiple times on these forums. IT IS NOT TRUE. Simple calculations show that Quartz countertops are well over 80% Quartz by volume.

Density of quartz = ~2.6 g/cc
Density of acrylic resin = ~1.0 g/cc (the same as water)

If the material is 93% by weight quartz + 7% by weight resin, in 1g of material we would have 0.93g quartz and 0.07g resin.

Volume of 0.93g quartz = 0.93 / 2.6 = 0.36cc
Volume of 0.07g resin = 0.07 / 1.0 = 0.07cc

So 1g of material has a volume of 0.36 + 0.07 = 0.43cc

Percentage of quartz by volume = 0.36 / 0.43 = 84%
Percentage of resin by volume = 0.07 / 0.43 = 16%

It is obvious that quartz countertops are mostly quartz regardless of whether you measure weight or volume. For quartz countertops to be more than half resin, quartz would have to be about as dense as depleted uranium.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

My wife laid her computer mouse on the Caesarstone. One day we heard an electrical pop, looked all around at the appliances, etc., but couldn't smell or see anything suspicious. A few days later I picked up the mouse and, OMG! The battery in the mouse had exploded, leaked out onto the counter top and now I have a 4-inch x 1/4 inch white stripe on the Caesarstone. Is there any way to fix this? I have tried scrubbing to no avail. Any help will be greatly appreciated.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

Call a granite fabricator and see if they can come and polish it out....


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

A quartz surface will lose its sheen when polished, so expect to see the repaired area as a dull spot, especially if it's in the path of natural or artificial lighting. Resins won't polish out like granite.


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I am a fabricator.

"@oldryder said "approx. 30% of the material making up the surface is resin. That is a lie."

That turns out not to be the case. The actual percentage is subject to debate and may vary by brand and color but the fact that the percentage of quartz advertised refers to weight came from a product rep of one of the major quartz suppliers.

(for example, since the quartz is not colored by the dye additives used in the manufacturing process it is reasonable to assume that solid colors with no grain have a larger percentage of resin.)

I stand by the assertion that a bucket of rocks weighs more than a bucket of glue.

Regardless of the specific percentages involved the resin component of the surface of a quartz countertop is susceptible to scratching and can be easily scratched by a kitchen knife. The greater the percentage of the surface thats resin the more prone to scratching the surface will be.

In an installation training class given by a major quartz manufacturer they taught a specific procedure to hide a scratch.
(filling the scratch with crazy glue and then razor blade-ing off the excess.)


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

I am a fabricator.

"@oldryder said "approx. 30% of the material making up the surface is resin. That is a lie."

That turns out not to be the case. The actual percentage is subject to debate and may vary by brand and color but the fact that the percentage of quartz advertised refers to weight came from a product rep of one of the major quartz suppliers.

(for example, since the quartz is not colored by the dye additives used in the manufacturing process it is reasonable to assume that solid colors with no grain have a larger percentage of resin.)

I stand by the assertion that a bucket of rocks weighs more than a bucket of glue.

Regardless of the specific percentages involved the resin component of the surface of a quartz countertop is susceptible to scratching and can be easily scratched by a kitchen knife. The greater the percentage of the surface thats resin the more prone to scratching the surface will be.

In an installation training class given by a major quartz manufacturer they taught a specific procedure to hide a scratch.
(filling the scratch with crazy glue and then razor blade-ing off the excess.)


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RE: Caesarstone STAINING!!

It seems most engineered stone does well as countertop material in most cases. However I have seen it scratch,stain and burn on occasions.
Old Ryder makes a good point here regarding the percentages of quartz to resin.
I would think 30% would be low but I am sure there are some discrepancies.
I have heard that each slab manufactured can have different characteristics as the resins cure at different rates.
One of the reasons why it is hard to hone and polish them.
Such as the battery stain/etch on the surface. It may be possible to remove it and re polish it but the task would be no less than a crapshoot with no predictable results.
In most engineered stones scratches can be removed and the surfaces re polished. Lighter colors respond better than darker colors however.


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