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Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

Posted by bookmom41 (My Page) on
Sat, Sep 15, 12 at 17:03

We are planning on a marmoleum floor in the sheet product for our remodel. Our kitchen is long and narrowish, about 25 feet long and 12.5 feet wide. The flooring store salesperson called today to discuss seams, pointing out the linoleum rolls are roughly 6.5 feet wide. Do we run it with one seam going down slightly off-center but running the 25 feet across the length? Or I guess we could run it going across the width with several seams? We are going with butt seams, not heat welded. We also thought about using two colors of sheet, doing a border as well as a rug-type inlay under the kitchen table, but that sounds like about a million seams right now.

Would love any suggestions and comments about where to put the seams from others with Marmoleum, and would also like to hear from anyone else with ideas about this. Will cross-post this in flooring but it isn't as active over there. :) Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

I'd personally go with having the least seams possible if one color floor, but if running a few seams in the other direction would serve to 'hide' them (under cabs or island or something) I'd maybe consider that.

If a pattern or design, then that will drive the # of seams. Make SURE your installer knows what he's doing up to and including looking at samples of his work somewhere.

Check out Donnaleen's marmoleum install for an example of an excellent seaming job.

Now that my seam issue is fixed (bad heat weld replaced with butt), I love my floor and I know Donnaleen feels the same about hers.

Good luck! And oh, what colors are you thinking of using?


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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

Thank you, Deedles! As far as colors, if we just use one, I think it will be either barley or caribbean. If we do the border/rug bit, then it will probably be barley and jade. Considering the rough estimate I got today was around $4500 for just the single color sheet job, I doubt we will jack up the price further to start doing inlays.

Ugh on the seams. They really won't be hidden, and we have a peninsula, not an island. I guess the one long seam won't be a problem IF they do an excellent job with the butt. Deedles, was your marmoleum laid before your cabinetry went in? In other words, is it under your cabinets, or cut out around them?


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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

Um, ours is currently just in a small bedroom with plans to run it into the entry and kitchen when we get there.

I spoke with the floor guy that fixed the seam about the under the cab idea and he felt it was better to do it that way. I've also read (somewhere) that this material breathes and moves with temp/humidity so you only put it up to the cabs. I may not be the person to ask on this question.

Maybe start another thread with that specific question as the title. Then others that have done it in their kitchen can weigh in.


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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

Supposedly, our floor will be laid before the cabinets and will run underneath them. The flooring store owner met with DH and me, and showed us pics of a large commercial job in which they did the marmoleum, talked about how well it wears, etc., but that job used heat-welded seams. I never even thought to question if the floor should run under the cabinets... or not. One more thing to "double-check."


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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

We did ours in Caribbean last year. We have two seams across the kitchen, but that was because we were also laying it in the adjoining hallways (and the closets), bathroom and laundry room. The hallway is one piece that has the seam under the door transistions. The same with the bath and the laundry room.

I can say that no one ever notices the seam till I point it out, and everyone thinks it looks good even with the seam. If you get a good person, they should be able to butt the seams so it will be almost seamless.

From Gardenweb photos

From Gardenweb photos

From 2011-07-19


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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

Less seams is better unless (like Deedles said) there is some overriding reason to run it the other way. Our kitchen is roughly 20 by 20, so our seams run almost as long as you are talking about.

It's a wonderful material. We have VanGogh. Also love your Caribbean, Senator13.

Not sure why they want to run it under the cabinets in your case. In our case, it goes up to the edge of the pre-existing sink cabinet and under our island due to the legs.

Here is a link to my install. Just be sure you have a good installer. There are people out there who claim to know what they are doing but don't.

Here is a link that might be useful: marmoleum install


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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

Our kitchen is almost the exact dimensions of yours. We have two seams running the long way, and the cabinets are on top of the flooring. The seams were heat-welded with pattern and color-matching seam material. The company that installed it does primarily commercial installations, but there were virtually no other options in this area (Long Island, NY). It's just not a popular flooring choice here.
They did a great job, and you can see the seams, but they do not stand out in any way. We do have a fairly busy pattern, Asian Tiger, so that might make a difference.


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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

We just had armstrong linoleum last month (no sheet marmoleum available here). This may be different for the armstrong compared to marmoleum, but the marbling has a clear direction. Our seam runs with that direction, which I think helps hide it.
The installer also mentioned that like any seam, it will wear. He mentioned this because we have chairs over the seam, and he was indicating the chairs would be harder on the seam than just walking, so maybe keep in mind the areas of heaviest wear?


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RE: Which way to run Marmoleum floor seams?

Thank you for all the input, everyone! I am a bit nervous about using Marmoleum; I think I ended up choosing it as my default after ruling out nearly everything else. (tile=too hard; sheet vinyl=I'm sick of it and want something new; wood=will make the adjacent wood flooring look in even more need of refinishing, haha, and given the two entrances from garage and deck right into kitchen, we are hard on flooring; and click-type flooring=me being worried about spills and drips from my messy bearded dog.) Thanks so much to those of you who posted pictures, and it looks like the Marmoleum was installed prior to, and runs under, the cabinetry for those folks getting new cabinets. It does sound like the seam will end up running lengthwise and that way, we will just have one seam rather than several. No matter where the seams end up, they will see/feel traffic so I will mention that concern to the flooring store.

Senator, how does your Caribbean color "read" to you? Is your overall impression a warm tannish, do you really notice the blue/gray? Thanks!


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